I-Geners are much more likely to experience mental health issues than their millennial siblings


#1

After two or more hours a day of time on-line, suicide risk factors rose significantly. The second data set cited by Twenge correlated more time on social media with greater unhappiness, the reverse was not found; the degree of unhappiness didn’t lead to more social media use, although less use in one study did correlate with less unhappiness.As Twenge concludes, even if time online doesn’t directly harm mental health, it may still adversely affect it in indirect ways, like reducing face to face connection, an important aspect of happiness, and increasing isolation, a key risk factor for suicide.

According to the study that is cited in this article, about half of all teens in the US described themselves as being online “constantly”.

Does anyone have any feedback? Especially some of the young people here. What’s your experience been like with internet access and social media? How is it effecting you?


#2

I’m a millennial but I feel just about everyone up to the baby boomers generation are spending about the same time online. The exception are those who work outdoors or in jobs that demand constant attention like farmers and construction workers but it would seem they make up for it after work.
Based on my anecdote, I would guess older people are less susceptible to mental health problems despite probably the same usage amount is because their brains are more fixed and less malleable. For my generation, we weren’t immersed in the social media age for as long as I-Geners during our formative years so that might explain the findings. So I’m jarred by the sight of toddlers playing with tablets and smartphones.
For those who didn’t see this earlier, curbing usage isn’t going to be easy as Rod Dreher summarizes here:

I am a total axe-grinder about the way parents — even Christian parents who are otherwise vigilant about their kids’ engagement with pop culture — roll over for technology, and hand their children over to it.

In my family, we are pretty strict with our kids regarding technology, but it’s a constant struggle, especially with FOMO — fear of missing out. The thing is, they really are missing out, because most of their friends do most of their socializing (“socializing”) online. But for us parents, what is the alternative? Turn our kids over to this monster?


It would be interesting to look at older and younger millennials to see if such a similar trend exists within my generation.


#3

And they can face even worse mental health issues if parents don’t want to be serious:

What more do you need to know, Mom and Dad. Get rid of the smartphone, now. If you cannot be persuaded to consider the emotional and spiritual health of your daughter, think of it this way: Twenty years from now, when your daughter has her college degree, and is getting ahead in her profession, how will you and she feel when some disgusting pedophile humiliates her by broadcasting a film of her sexually degrading herself when she was a teenager — or younger? What kind of blackmail opportunities are you giving these monsters because you are too cowardly to say “no” to your daughter (or son) when they demand this technology that they are too young to use responsibly?


#4

I agree that it is not just the young people online. I’m a Gen X and we are too. It’s not good for any of us.


#5

Millennial here; got rid of all social media eight years ago and never looked back.


#6

This topic was automatically closed 14 days after the last reply. New replies are no longer allowed.


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.