‘I got deported from Mexico!’ Country expels hundreds of U.S. citizens every year


#1

‘I got deported from Mexico!’ Country expels hundreds of U.S. citizens every year

Mexico City – Patrick Kowalski was 26 when he got bored of his job in the U.S. and took a trip to Mexico on a tourist visa in search of adrenaline and ready for anything.

He wanted to live like a Mexican, he said, and get to know the historic and cultural sites that everybody around him seemed to be talking about.

He ended up settling in Acapulco, where he said he lived his dream life of little work and plenty of booze and marijuana — until he was accused of robbing a woman. The accuser went to authorities, who asked him for his passport. That’s when it emerged that his tourist permit to stay in Mexico had expired.

“I found myself in the prosecutor’s office in Acapulco, where they called immigration to deport me,” Kowalski told Fox News Latino a year after the incident, in a telephone interview from Miami, where he now lives.

“I never imagined that an American could be expelled from Mexico,” he added.

Not only can U.S. citizens get deported from Mexico, they do.

Deported Americans accounted for more than 2,000 cases in 2015, an average of five cases per day or more. In 2014, 1,243 Americans were deported from Mexico, according to figures provided by the Mexican migration policy unit.

As of October of this year, 2,079 American citizens had been deported — the majority of them through Baja California, with other border states like Tamaulipas and Sonora also seeing frequent cases.

Americans account for about 10 percent of undocumented people who Mexico deports – the total number is 127,149. A large majority of people expelled from Mexico are from Central America, which saw almost 120,000 people deported from Mexico, most of them returned to Guatemala and Honduras.

latino.foxnews.com/latino/news/2015/12/18/got-deported-from-mexico-country-expels-hundreds-us-citizens-every-year/


#2

“I never imagined that an American could be expelled from Mexico,” he added.

So the person in that article just assumed that Americans can ignore another country’s immigration laws? He was in Mexico on an expired tourist visa that he was violating by working. Being an American doesn’t give you license to ignore another country’s laws.


#3

Agreed.

Swap nationalities here and one will find rhetoric similar to many open borders advocates, which I assume is the OP’s intent in pointing out.


#4

Actually Mexico.has very tough mmigration laws. They deport not only a.lot of.Americans but a lot of Guatemalans and Nicaraguans. And they tackle heavily employers so if you work there without a permitt (unlike the US) most likely you will get deported.


#5

I just found the story interesting and curious; a bit like the “human interest” types of stories we read here because many of us have been to Mexico and yes, in the day, I would be very careful of upsetting the apple cart so to speak and in those days, it was probably a lot more safer. I was by myself in Mexico City in the '90s, with my airplane ticket back, enough cab fare to get to the airport from the hotel, my luggage and nothing else, no credit cards, I just hung on to my cc all morning, the rest of the group left to Zihuatenejo, the beach but I wanted to see more of the Capital City. So if things had somehow gone wrong, I’m not sure how I could have made it back very easily. Pretty far away in the world’s largest city or at least, one of them.


#6

Or does it? Suppose Mr. Marijuana, booze, and no job DID actually rob the woman?

Then … ALL he gets is deported? To … where? Marijuana is now legal in Colorado (which is, however, not as warm and nice as Acapulco).

IMO it is far worse to be incarcerated in Mexico than deported from it (presumably to the U.S.). Even during “the Obama Years”! :eek:

Compare this stoner’s story to that of the U.S. Marine Andrew Tahmooresi, who made a wrong turn at the Mexican border with (legal) guns in his car, tried to get turned around to go home and the Mexican police took the opportunity to imprison him for months … under horrible conditions.

cnn.com/2014/05/30/us/mexico-us-marine-detained/


#7

Truly an old story:

[quote]
[size=]So here we are in the Tijuana Jail
Ain’t got no friends to go our bail
So here we’ll stay 'cause we can’t pay
Just send our mail to the Tijuana Jail

[/quote]

[/size]
metrolyrics.com/the-tijuana-jail-lyrics-kingston-trio.html

http://i1.ytimg.com/vi/udZLAMMPkcU/hqdefault.jpg

youtube.com/watch?v=udZLAMMPkcU

In seriousness, Mexican Jails, most of them at least, are probably notoriously, holding my speech, very bad and sure, I’m sure a lot of Americans and other foreigners can get tossed in one and it may well be difficult to find an easy remedy to get out.


#8

Oh, boy. So to “live like a Mexican” means getting high, drunk, and hardly working? :confused:

Nice. If I actually gave a flip about what bums like him think I might be offended, being part Mexican myself and all.


#9

I’m not part Mexican, so I have no cause to be offended, but nonetheless I find it offensive. :slight_smile:

I also find it embarrassing that Americans go abroad to be stupid. It’s like kids–would you rather they threw tantrums in the grocery store or in your own home? In the same way, I’d rather Americans stayed home to be stupid.

Of course you could be deported from Mexico. Or Canada. I’m not 100% sure whether you can be deported from Puerto Rico (because of the unusual relationship between PR and the US), but I’m darn sure you can be deported from anywhere else. I’ve never personally heard anyone say anything so stupid (as “I didn’t know I could be deported from a country I was in illegally”), but of course it doesn’t come up very often in conversation.

–Jen


#10

Puerto Rico is a US territory, so I’m pretty sure that Americans do not get kicked out from there.

But I imagine that quite a few of ours do get kicked out of Canada, but it is kept on the qt.

In this case, I concur that the young man was fortunate that his visa had expired, else he’d see the rough side of the Mexican judicial system.

Just as with those few who drive into MX with firearms, our citizens need to remember that the Constitution ends at the Rio Grande!

ICXC NIKA


#11

If you have a history that includes a drunk driving arrest I think Canada won’t let you in the country for something like 10 years.


#12

Bravo for them, they don’t need our drunks.

ICXC NIKA


#13

I remember the song. I even remember short hair being “in”!

Before Mike Trout even. :smiley:


#14

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