I hate to complain but I am so depressed and upset with how things are going


#1

Things are so messed up right now in my Church. New priests. Liturgical changes/abuses. Big changes. People arguing. People leaving. Old liberals coming back because they see an opening. Parish school is changing. I am Catholic as they come but this is seriously depressing me. All that I knew and loved about my Church is leaving. I am going to Mass somewhere else and have been for a while. I’m thinking about moving my kids out of the school if something doesn’t change. It is KILLING me to watch this happen. I’m sorry that I am just complaining, but I’m sure this isn’t the first time this has happened to anyone. If you have any words of advice , please, I need them. :frowning:


#2

Prayer and patience :wink:


#3

My dear friend
The pope knows about these problems and is putting in place measures to fix them. Following is some articles from Zenit news service which you can subscribe to if you like here

[FONT=Helvetica]ZENIT[/FONT]

The World Seen From Rome

ZE09090501 - 2009-09-05

The Wrong Question

Article: Why Go Back?
Ms. Poole objects to the direction which the Holy Father is leading the Church regarding the liturgy. She equates fidelity to the liturgical tradition and the desire of the Pope to restore a sense of the sacred as "going back."
The Missal of Pius V, known now as the Extraordinary Form, never was and still is not the possession of the elite. Is Ms. Poole unfamiliar with the various Saints (i.e. Vianney, Bosco, etc.) who taught the poor to love the Mass and to see it as it truly is: The Sacrifice of Christ made present in space and time for the benefit of all humanity?
The Pope has made the case that a rupture took place after the council in the liturgical life of the Church. This was not the intention of the Council but the result of powerful dissenters who sought to corrupt the Roman Rite.
Benedict is rightly calling upon all Catholics to reclaim what is rightfully theirs: a profoundly beautiful liturgical tradition crowned with the jewel of sacred music worthy of God.
“Why go back?” is not the right question. More correctly should we ask: "What happened that so many people were duped into accepting the liturgical chaos which was hoisted upon us?"
Ms. Poole, our churches in the West are empty, our confessional lines are short and the indifference of so many baptized wounds the Heart of Christ.
Lets admit that we took the wrong path, no matter how well intentioned, which led us to the present mess.
Let us also admit that the Pope is the voice of Christ in the Church and that where he is leading us is where Christ wishes us to go.
Father Peter J. DiMaria
Stella Maris Church, Philadelphia

[FONT=Helvetica]ZENIT[/FONT]

The World Seen From Rome

ZE09090606 - 2009-09-06

Pontiff Calls for Christian Social Action

Underlines Need to Address "Educational Emergency"
VITERBO, Italy, SEPT. 6, 2009 (Zenit.org).- Benedict XVI is underlining the importance of Christian charitable works and social action, especially in the field of education and catechesis.
The Pope affirmed this today in his homily at a Mass he celebrated in the Faul Valley in Viterbo, where he spent the day.
He underlined the priority of “education in the faith,” understood as "life in Christ."
The Pontiff affirmed that “catechists and all educators are called to commit themselves,” as well as schools from primary age to the universities.
He pointed to the example of saints such as St. Rosa Venerini and St. Lucia Filippini, stating, "One could still happily draw from these spiritual sources to confront, with lucidity and coherence, the current inescapable and pressing ‘educational emergency,’ a great challenge for every Christian community and for society as a whole …]."
Along with education, the Holy Father emphasized the importance of "the testimony of the faith."
The Church’s initiatives and charitable works are “signs of faith in and love of God, who is Love,” he affirmed.
Benedict XVI continued: "This is where voluntary service flourishes and must always increase, whether at the personal level or the organized level. In charity this voluntary service has its propulsive and educative organism."
Charity in prayer
Among these charitable works, he mentioned the consecrated persons in cloistered monasteries, who are “a visible reminder of the primacy of God in our existence” and who "show us that prayer is the first form of charity."
The Pope made particular mention of one of Viterbo’s citizens, Bles sed Domenico Bàrberi, "the Passionist priest who, in 1845, welcomed John Henry Newman – who later became a cardinal – into the Catholic Church."
The Pontiff urged his listeners to give "attention to the signs of God."
He added: "Listening to his word and discerning his signs must be the work of every Christian community.
"The most immediate of God’s signs is certainly care for one’s neighbor …]."
The Holy Father stated, "Faithful laypeople, young people, families, do not be afraid to live and bear witness to the faith in the various spheres of society, in the multiple situations of human existence!"
He continued: "The seasons succeed each other, social contexts change, but the vocation of Christians to live the Gospel in solidarity with the human family does not change or go out of fashion with the passing of time.
“This is social commitment; this is the service proper to polit ical action; this is integral human development.”


On ZENIT’s Web page:
Full text: zenit.org/article-26787?l=english

Hope you are encouraged by the work our wonderful Pope is doing right now to fix these and many problems.

God bless you dear friend:thumbsup::slight_smile:

John


#4

I am in the same boat as the OP. As for the encouraging news of what the Pope is doing, I’m grateful. However, I’ve read about such hopeful things from time to time but it does not change anything going on in my parish.:shrug:
I, too, go to another church when I can and I always feel more inspired even though they are weekday masses. The homilies are great every time. I too am sorry to complain, but it’s breaking my heart to see such a beautiful church as my parish being whittled down to a low common denomitator. I feel the homilies question people’s intelligence and assume we are all spiritual sluggards.:frowning: There are some masses at my parish I have to avoid because they are IMHO borderline Protestant, which is okay if you’re a Protestant but I long for the beauty of my Catholicism. I returned to the church three years ago, so inspired. I joined choir which I am now considering leaving. I’m tired of the “sesame street” songs, not being in the choir loft but placed on the altar. I’m tired of so many homilies emphasing people getting married as if it were the only thing single people should do and then they wonder why there is a lack of vocations.:shrug: When I watch Papal masses or other masses on EWTN, it’s a case of “eat your heart out”. So now, for my spiritual survival, I go to another church that inspires me when I can, I go to my parish for the mandatory weekend mass and I watch EWTN. I’m concerned about the days when I don’t have the time to go to the other church. One’s parish church should be sufficient, especially if one goes to mass a few times a week or so, shouldn’t it?:confused:


#5

I’ve done much the same thing. The liturgy is being reformed though. And it will be a big improvement I’m sure. The pope is recognising the mess catholic schools are in from a spiritual perspective by the looks of things. In the meantime travelling may be needed.

God bless you dear friend:thumbsup::slight_smile:

John


#6

After our longtime pastor passed away a few years ago, and the new pastor took over, there was a very turbulent period of transition and adjustment in the parish. Some people left and some embraced the changes; if the politics there are disturbing you so much, you should think about moving to another parish. It is the same Church after all.


#7

I know that is an option…and it’s not just the politics by the way. There are liturgical abuses as well. And also, I’m just saying that I shouldn’t have to. To the earlier post, I know that the Holy Father is doing what he can but I guarantee you he has no clue about my parish or that it even exists for that matter…he’s a busy man! I say that knowing what you meant, but man, why does it take so long!!! I know it took a long time to get messed up but it kills me to have to watch things fall apart like this. :frowning: It doesn’t feel like home anymore…


#8

I really feel for you. Numerous places that I lived I’ve had to put up with pablum/abuses so much that I’d almost dread going to church on Sunday. I’ve even longed for my old Episcopalian church because there was more reverence there. I don’t know what to say other than :console: Be glad you have the other parish to go to and that you have EWTN. I can’t get it now and really miss it. The parishes that my wallet can afford gas to are even worse (my current parish does have positive things, such as Perpetual Adoration - that is more than many people have available to them.)


#9

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