I have a book with imprimatur, but


#1

I have a book with imprimatur one of the cardinals. In that book are many latters of one blessed person. But that person urgently asked destroy letters.
I feel confused. Can I read this book?


#2

if the book already has an imprimatur then it is ok to read even if it contains letters by a blessed that were asked to be destroyed. Obviously, the letters were not, (maybe God didn't want them to be) and now have the approval from the Church in a book for the faithful to read.


#3

[quote="EPEJO_ROZ, post:1, topic:345734"]
I have a book with imprimatur one of the cardinals. In that book are many latters of one blessed person. But that person urgently asked destroy letters.
I feel confused. Can I read this book?

[/quote]

That's a little vague. But recall that St. Thomas Aquinas had a vision in which he experienced a foretaste of the beatific vision and he never wrote another word seeing all that he wrote as so much straw before the glory of God. But that hasn't stopped the Church from extensively using his Summa Theologica for centuries. It's a brilliant work of theology. But even the most brilliant works of human hands pale in comparison to the infinite glory of God.

My guess is that this would probably be the reason that the Blessed person asked that the letters be destroyed. Not knowing who you are talking about, I cannot say for sure, though. But if the person was a religious, then the decision to destory the letters was not up to them but to their religious superior. They can certainly make a request. But the religious superior does not have to follow it simply because the person asking was holy.


#4

[quote="EPEJO_ROZ, post:1, topic:345734"]
I have a book with imprimatur one of the cardinals. In that book are many latters of one blessed person. But that person urgently asked destroy letters.
I feel confused. Can I read this book?

[/quote]

Imprimatur only means let it be printed. Often bishops or cardinals give this without even having read the book.
The more important one is Nihil Obstat which means there is nothing in the book that contradicts Church teachings on faith and morals.


#5

[quote="thistle, post:4, topic:345734"]
Imprimatur only means let it be printed. Often bishops or cardinals give this without even having read the book.
The more important one is Nihil Obstat which means there is nothing in the book that contradicts Church teachings on faith and morals.

[/quote]

Don't they usually go hand in hand? i haven't seen one with out the other.


#6

Sometimes a saint is wrong and sinners are right. If these letters are of spiritual benefit to people it may be good for them to be published even if they person who wrote them understandibly wanted them to be kept private. This was the case, I believe, with the letters of Mother Teresa (Bl. Teresa of Calcutta), which I suspect may be what you are referring to.


#7

A great many saints and holy people possess a great humility, so it is understandable that they might want their writings and correspondence destroyed. The very idea that any attention would go to them instead of Christ would be repulsive to them, when in actuality, they are often a reflection of the light of Christ, and therefore worthy of our attention. As has been mentioned, usually a bishop or religious superior makes the decision to overrule the holy person's wishes, for our greater benefit. Without knowing any more specifics, I would say feel free to read without consternation!


#8

[quote="robwar, post:5, topic:345734"]
Don't they usually go hand in hand? i haven't seen one with out the other.

[/quote]

I have often seem Imprimtaur without the Nihil Obstat.


#9

Thanks for the thoughts.. It is difficult to decide anyway:confused:..
I start to think, that this is not like sometimes maybe I say - "no, no please, no", but really think - "yes, please. I just can't say yes first without telling no..". My humility isn't perfect. But this is not about me. Maybe that persons request was without spot (blot)?..

I really want to read that book..
Maybe I have to try ask God..:shrug:


#10

What book is it? Maybe someone here has read it and can give you some feedback. Ideally, if it has an imprimatur it is trustworthy. However that is subject to human error and I imagine some lemons occasionally get through.


#11

[quote="Joe_5859, post:3, topic:345734"]
That's a little vague. But recall that St. Thomas Aquinas had a vision in which he experienced a foretaste of the beatific vision and he never wrote another word seeing all that he wrote as so much straw before the glory of God. But that hasn't stopped the Church from extensively using his Summa Theologica for centuries. It's a brilliant work of theology. But even the most brilliant works of human hands pale in comparison to the infinite glory of God.

My guess is that this would probably be the reason that the Blessed person asked that the letters be destroyed. Not knowing who you are talking about, I cannot say for sure, though. But if the person was a religious, then the decision to destory the letters was not up to them but to their religious superior. They can certainly make a request. But the religious superior does not have to follow it simply because the person asking was holy.

[/quote]

That's right. The first Pope asked that Jesus be spared from death -- look at Jesus' reply (Matthew 16:21-23) :D


#12

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