I have a question about birth control!


#1

I'm wondering if it is all right for birth control to be used to regulate periods?

My mom told me it was against the catholic religion to take them. I understand fully that contraceptives are used to prevent pregnancies, and that's something God does not want. However, I'm abstinent. I will stay abstinent until marriage. I'm not in a relationship, or in any situation that I'd use birth control to prevent pregnancy. I just want to use it because my menstruation cycle is horribly irregular. Is there any reason that I shouldn't use it? There's really no need for me to have a menstruation cycle if I'm not planning on having children before the age of 23. Help? :)


#2

Morally there is nothing wrong with using a "medicine" to heal, even though its unintended side effect is sterlizing.

However, you should know fully how bad the birth control pill is for you. It is not making you healthy, it is masking the symptoms. It is a carcinogen. go to an NFP-only doctor who will find out what is making you irregular and actually heal the problem rather than cover it up.

you can find them at www.omsoul.com


#3

Taking birth control to treat a legitimate medical condition is acceptable. What I think you'll find debate regarding is whether an irregular cycle is something that needs treatment. Why do you want to treat it? Unless you have serious bleeding issues that need treatment, I'm not sure what the need would be.


#4

I’ll consider going to a NFP thing. Not sure where I can find one, but I’ll talk to my mom about it.
It’s really just irregular periods and extreme cramping that I want to get rid of. I know I can take pain killers for the cramping, but most of the time it’s really severe and unprescribed stuff doesn’t work for me.
Thanks though :slight_smile:


#5

Combined hormonal contraceptives (like the pill) are a class 1 carcinogen as outlined by the WHO.

For the sake of your long-term health, find another treatment. Not to mention, using a birth control pill to regular periods is like putting a bandaid on a broken leg. It just covers the problem; it doesn't actually TREAT the problem.

No, though, it's not immoral to take a medication to treat your problems, even if it is also used as a contraceptive. As long as you are not using it as a contraceptive.


#6

[quote="ryanethelion, post:4, topic:235812"]
I'll consider going to a NFP thing. Not sure where I can find one, but I'll talk to my mom about it.
It's really just irregular periods and extreme cramping that I want to get rid of. I know I can take pain killers for the cramping, but most of the time it's really severe and unprescribed stuff doesn't work for me.
Thanks though :)

[/quote]

Start with One More Soul's prolife doctor directory.


#7

As others have noted/implied, if the main purpose is medicinal, then it is acceptable by the Catholic Church. My first wife had been on them (long before I knew her and long before she ever had sex), simply because her periods were so bad she would faint from blood loss.

When it comes to medical advice, that is a matter between you and your doctor. I personally recommend a doctor familiar with both western and alternative treatments (note: by “alternative” I mean doctors that are familiar the relationship between body and environment). Western doctors are good with drugs, but they generally treat symptoms. Alternative doctors effect cures. A doctor with knowledge of both will have all bases covered.


#8

I have irregular cycles.

My sister had irregular cycles plus very painful periods and endometriosis…her periods hurt so bad that she was prone to throwing up.

My sis was on the pill for a short period of time to help her function (it was getting in the way of her job) but she was also unmarried and sexually inactive. She’s no longer on it because apparently running was like a magic cure fer her and she’s like clockwork now…naturally.

I never took the pill.

For the sake of your long-term health, find another treatment. Not to mention, using a birth control pill to regular periods is like putting a bandaid on a broken leg. It just covers the problem; it doesn’t actually TREAT the problem.

No, though, it’s not immoral to take a medication to treat your problems, even if it is also used as a contraceptive. As long as you are not using it as a contraceptive.

This was basically why. I knew I had something (which turned out to be PCOS)…and the pill was not going to help me get to the root of the matter or cure it.

Also I found out through NFP that I occasionally have annovulatory cycles. If I have a “period” without the cramps it means I never ovulated and this is just breakthrough bleeding. Pill-induced cycles suddenly seemed phony and undesirable. I’d never know if I was truly getting “better” or not.


#9

before considering the use of birth control as a medicine… consider the future risks of using birth control. The idea of BC is to regulate hormones and make your body seem as if it’s pregnant, thus sheathing the egg. The only problem with that is, your body isn’t supposed to feel like it’s pregnant. There is an extremely close relationship between breast cancer and the pill because it hormonally imbalances your system, and an imbalanced system means cellular dysfunction, and cellular dysfunction means cancer. Also, if you ever do plan to have children, using the pill sometimes decreases your chances to conceive. Anyways, just something to think about!

Peace and God bless!


#10

You should do some research about how proper nutrition may help your painful periods.

Vitamin E supplements may help make them less painful (without giving you cancer- like the pill could do.) Eating foods rich with Vitamin A may help make the bleeding lighter.


#11

[quote="ryanethelion, post:1, topic:235812"]
...I understand fully that contraceptives are used to prevent pregnancies, and that's something God does not want. ...

[/quote]

Something I noticed you said after re-reading your original post------ God sometimes DOES want to prevent pregnancies. The Church opposes artificial forms of birth control not simply because they prevent pregnancy but because they create an artificial barrier between husband and wife thus making the wife to become a sexual object. Rather than respecting a woman's fertility- it treats it like a disease that needs to be cured.

God made you a woman and gave you the gift of fertility. And even though God is not asking you to use that gift right now at this time in your life- you should respect, cherish, and guard it. And even though your "gift" is irregular right now, taking BC pills won't "cure" you or even "regulate" you. They will actually put your body in a frozen state rather than a true "cycle."

Track your cycle, record your symptoms, learn about what is really going on in the body God gave you, and made to do the most amazing thing in the world- give life!


#12

[quote="Stella_Matutina, post:10, topic:235812"]
You should do some research about how proper nutrition may help your painful periods.

Vitamin E supplements may help make them less painful (without giving you cancer- like the pill could do.) Eating foods rich with Vitamin A may help make the bleeding lighter.

[/quote]

Agreed. Check out the book "Fertility, Cycles, and Nutrition" by Marilyn Shannon.

The pill just masks the symptoms; it won't cure the underlying problem. It's a quick easy fix which is why most doctors hand it out like candy despite its risks (my SIL nearly died due to blood clots caused by the Pill).

If you can, find an NFP doctor in your area so he can find out what's causing your painful cycles and treat the actual issue instead of just the symptoms. If you have potential infertility issues (such as Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome), it's good to know that now instead of when you are already married and have been trying to have a baby for months on end.


#13

thanks everyone :)
i'll be sure to research all of that. you've all helped a ton :)


#14

[quote="ryanethelion, post:1, topic:235812"]
I'm wondering if it is all right for birth control to be used to regulate periods?

My mom told me it was against the catholic religion to take them. I understand fully that contraceptives are used to prevent pregnancies, and that's something God does not want. However, I'm abstinent. I will stay abstinent until marriage. I'm not in a relationship, or in any situation that I'd use birth control to prevent pregnancy. I just want to use it because my menstruation cycle is horribly irregular. Is there any reason that I shouldn't use it? There's really no need for me to have a menstruation cycle if I'm not planning on having children before the age of 23. Help? :)

[/quote]

I was in your situation as a teenager. I had a different type of physical pain though, which was before my period. I was on the pill for a while (4 years or so) to help it. I was not married (obviously) and not having sex anyway, so it was just a medication to me.

However, knowing what I now know about the pill, about fertility, etc. I wish I had not been on it. After I went off it in college because it stopped seeming like it was actually helping, my body took months to get back into its regular cycle. Months.

I do not recommend going on the pill.

Try reading up on nfp. I recommend that because it will educate you a great deal about how your body works. Not every woman always has cycles of the same length, and contrary to popular belief, that is not automatically a bad thing. I understand it can be very annoying to be unsure about when to expect your period, but if you learn about nfp and chart your cycles, that will become easier. (basically if you know when ovulation has happened, your period will generally always come the same number of days after that. It's the pre-ovulation phase of the cycle where variation in length can happen. If your period is "late," in reality it's your ovulation that was late, and the period came "on time" relative to the ovulation.)

I'm reading Taking Charge of Your Fertility by Toni Weschler. I got an old edition really cheap on amazon. (You just need to bear in mind that she is not a Catholic writer, and suggests barriers sometimes.) It is very informative about reproductive health in general. And she does address supposed "irregular" cycles. Even if you're not intending to reproduce yet, you still really should understand your body. I wish i learned all this as a teenager. I appreciate my body a lot more now that I know it has a system that is more than just bleeding every certain number of days.

Good luck, I hope you don't decide to go on the pill. It's not the solution the medical industry makes it out to be. They seem to treat it like taking apsirin or something... but I digress. Best of luck.


#15

I’m in agreement with everyone else who is suggesting that you learn more about your body and start charting, before resorting to the pill.

I wish I had done this. I took it for a couple of years to help with cycle related issues, and I wish I never had. I tried several different kinds, but with each one was nauseous, tired all the time, and got more migraines than I started out with. When I decided to stop taking them, my body went haywire. It has not been the same since, and I haven’t taken them for over two years. I don’t know what it did, but now I get sick a lot more than I used to and generally don’t feel well. I’ve had a lot of expensive tests, and been to a lot of doctors, and no one can figure out what is wrong with me.

I think in extreme cases, it can be helpful. But I would caution you to only use it as an absolute last resort, and find a doctor who is interested in working with you instead of just putting you on the pill. Learn about your cycle- as others here suggested, if you can figure out when you ovulate, when your period will arrive isn’t much of a mystery anymore. And had I known what I was getting myself into, I would have put up with the cramping because my attempt to ease the pain with the pill resulted in far worse consequences.


#16

I’ll second everyone’s advice to look into the root cause of your irregular cycles before going on the pill-- better to fix what’s wrong, if possible, rather than just treat the symptoms.

I did want to respond to this, however:

Combined hormonal contraceptives (like the pill) are a class 1 carcinogen as outlined by the WHO.

Yes, hormonal contraceptives are classified as class I carcinogens by the WHO. So are alcohol and some types of salted fish; there is also a note in the WHO monograph (monographs.iarc.fr/ENG/Classification/ClassificationsAlphaOrder.pdf) that oral contraceptives also offer a protective effect against other types of cancer (endometrial, ovarian). Absolutely, we should be cautious about putting these chemicals in our bodies, especially if we don’t have to- but I don’t think the risk is truly akin to tobacco or radiation exposure.


#17

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