I have a relative who is 90 and a protestant. How do I evangelize her

One person in my family says she is close to dying soon so is there any tips on evangelizing a 90 year old person. Also, is there anyway one can speed of the RCIA process for individuals this old?

I don’t know.
I don’t know.

Pray the Divine Mercy chaplet for her when she is dying so Jesus will stand between her and Justice.

Do you actually spend time with this relative? You can’t evangelize someone you don’t know.

Do you pray for her?

What is her current status – does she belong to another religious community or none at all? Has she expressed an interest in becoming Catholic? Is she interested in religion in general, spirituality, prayer, faith, the afterlife? Is she open, or likely to be open, to your talking with her?

The answer to your first question is: You don’t.

Nothing in your post suggests that this individual has ever expressed interest in Catholicism. What you did post suggests that you are looking to ‘take advantage’ of a weak time (dying) to try and get ‘your way’ with a person who apparently in their 90 years on this earth, never expressed interest in it.

This just comes across more as you are looking for an ‘easy win’ than you are interested in the actual state of this person’s soul. Otherwise, why weren’t you evangelizing to this person years ago? They weren’t interested? Couldn’t get them to listen to you? Figure now they don’t have the option of shutting you down?

In answer to your second question, I really wouldn’t know. But if the individual in question isn’t interested, I highly doubt any priest would be willing to press the issue.

Now you are correct this individual has not expressed much interest in Catholicism. However many of your points are very off. For one, I am not looking for a “easy win” or am I trying to take advantage of her. I have great love for this woman and want her to find the truth, but I want her to do so in a way that I’m not forcing it down her throat and making her. That would be awful. Now to answer your other question I was not catholic all my life and once I did not get very involved until not that long ago. To be frank, she did listen to me when I answered a question she had asked. Now I wouldn’t have a problem if she tried to convert me.

Maybe I should’ve been a bit clearer. This person is not on her a death bed or anything but is simply an elderly woman.

I’d rather not give away to much information about this woman but I’m confident she would be open to talk to me. Also I do pray for her a bit but I do need to do more.

My suggestion:

  1. Read Matthew 25:35; do those things for her, for the Glory of God; the elderly always need our help, and for many elderly, the are prisoners of their frailties and loneliness. So take a wide reading of Matthew 25:35, not just a literal reading.

  2. Pray for her

  3. Put your trust in God’s mercy.

The one “must not do”: absolutely under no circumstances, proselytize her.

I think this means convert. Why exactly?

Pope Francis recently raised eyebrows by saying, in an interview, that “proselytism is solemn nonsense, it makes no sense.” Read more at catholic.com/blog/jimmy-akin/pope-francis-on-%E2%80%9Cproselytism%E2%80%9D

The word “proselytize” has the connotation of badgering someone into accepting what you want them to, especially by using emotional tricks or false logic that sounds good.

Basically, focus on prayer, your relationship with her, being a good witness through your actions, and making sure that any conversations you do have on religious issues are honest and truth seeking. (And keep in mind that these conversations do not have to be constant - and in fact generally just annoy people and are counter productive if they are.)

Which is to say, do what you would do with anyone else.

OP, The Holy Spirit can partner with people. But be aware, that you are the junior partner. :wink:
Pray for her, and care for her gently.
She’s lived a long life, thanks be to God.
If she asks to speak to a minister or priest summon one for her.

I mean this in a truly curious manner, but what is it that is so important to you to have her Catholic? The Catechism states:

CCC 1257 **The Lord himself affirms that Baptism is necessary for salvation.**60 He also commands his disciples to proclaim the Gospel to all nations and to baptize them.61 Baptism is necessary for salvation for those to whom the Gospel has been proclaimed and who have had the possibility of asking for this sacrament.62 The Church does not know of any means other than Baptism that assures entry into eternal beatitude; this is why she takes care not to neglect the mission she has received from the Lord to see that all who can be baptized are “reborn of water and the Spirit.” God has bound salvation to the sacrament of Baptism, but he himself is not bound by his sacraments.

CCC 1271 Baptism constitutes the foundation of communion among all Christians, including those who are not yet in full communion with the Catholic Church: "For men who believe in Christ and have been properly baptized are put in some, though imperfect, communion with the Catholic Church. Justified by faith in Baptism, [they] are incorporated into Christ; they therefore have a right to be called Christians, and with good reason are accepted as brothers by the children of the Catholic Church."81 "Baptism therefore constitutes the sacramental bond of unity existing among all who through it are reborn."82

If she is baptized, she is already connected to Christ.

Where is she in her faith journey? Meet her where she is, so to speak, and walk with her.

Does she pray? If so, ask if she would pray with you. Is she interested in the Bible? If so, you could read with her or talk about your own reading or the Scripture readings you heard at Mass. Is she lonely? If so, spend time regularly with her, either at her home or taking her out.

Catholics believe that Catholicism contains the fullness of revelation and the sacraments in a way that Protestant faiths do not (Orthodoxy containing valid sacraments, and being very close to us in the faith, but still not containing the fullness of it). Becoming Catholic then gives access to more truth about God, and more sacraments, which bestow more graces - which are all good in and of themselves, but also can help a person towards salvation.

Basically, we recognize that there is much good in the other Christian faiths, particularly baptism, but we do not believe these faiths to contain the fullness of truth (obviously, or we’d convert).

So a Catholic should think that becoming Catholic is important - perhaps not strictly necessary for salvation, but nevertheless a very good and helpful thing.

Please don’t…

=SuperDarkMan12;12922870]One person in my family says she is close to dying soon so is there any tips on evangelizing a 90 year old person. Also, is there anyway one can speed of the RCIA process for individuals this old?

First dear friend, know that it MAY NOT be “essential”:[not saying NOT good]

From Our Catholic Catechism:

**846 **How are we to understand this affirmation, often repeated by the Church Fathers? Re-formulated positively, it means that all salvation comes from Christ the Head through the Church which is his Body:

Basing itself on Scripture and Tradition, the Council teaches that the Church, a pilgrim now on earth, is necessary for salvation: the one Christ is the mediator and the way of salvation; he is present to us in his body which is the Church. He himself explicitly asserted the necessity of faith and Baptism, and thereby affirmed at the same time the necessity of the Church which men enter through Baptism as through a door***. Hence they could not be saved who, knowing that the Catholic Church was founded as necessary by God through Christ, would refuse either to enter it or to remain in it.***

847 This affirmation is not aimed at those who, through no fault of their own, do not know Christ and his Church:

Those who, through no fault of their own, do not know the Gospel of Christ or his Church, but who nevertheless seek God with a sincere heart, and, moved by grace, try in their actions to do his will as they know it through the dictates of their conscience - those too may achieve eternal salvation

1267 Baptism makes us members of the Body of Christ: “Therefore . . . we are members one of another.” Baptism incorporates us into the Church. From the baptismal fonts is born the one People of God of the New Covenant, which transcends all the natural or human limits of nations, cultures, races, and sexes: “For by one Spirit we were all baptized into one body.”

1271 Baptism constitutes the foundation of communion among all Christians, including those who are not yet in full communion with the Catholic Church: “For men who believe in Christ and have been properly baptized are put in some, though imperfect, communion with the Catholic Church. Justified by faith in Baptism, [they] are incorporated into Christ; they therefore have a right to be called Christians, and with good reason are accepted as brothers by the children of the Catholic Church.” “Baptism therefore constitutes the sacramental bond of unity existing among all who through it are reborn.”

So MY advise is for you to contact your priest and discuss this with him.

As for your RCIA Question: the priest has GREAT latitude as to the necessity and extent of absolutely needed instruction.

PRAY much for them!

God Bless,

Patrick

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