I want to learn Latin

Hi everybody,

I am new and my husband made me join. Looking forward to talk to you all and learning from all of you. :tiphat:

I commute to work everyday and am interested in learning Latin. I was wondering if anyone out there may know of good Latin language tapes.

Thanks for your assistance

[quote=bdksrk]Hi everybody,

I am new and my husband made me join. Looking forward to talk to you all and learning from all of you. :tiphat:

I commute to work everyday and am interested in learning Latin. I was wondering if anyone out there may know of good Latin language tapes.

Thanks for your assistance
[/quote]

I found this one online for Latin Source materials. It sounds pretty good. I did not go through all their links but it’s a place to start your seach. Good Luck.

love2learn.net/languages/latin.htm

Latina Christiana: Book I by Cheryl Lowe
1998, Memoria Press, two softcover books and an audio tape, Catholic
This is a popular program among homeschoolers who are interested in introducing the study of Latin during the grammar school years. Pronunciation is Ecclesiastical (rather than Classical), meaning that the pronunciation will be the same as what you would use and hear at a Latin Tridentine Mass and for singing Gregorian chant and other traditional Church music. The program consists of a student text (which resembles a workbook, but is intended as a text), a teacher’s manual (which contains a great deal of the grammar, lesson plans, and supplemental history lessons) and an audio tape, which covers all of the student text (in a Southern accent). Students will learn endings for the first two declensions, but only do translations in the nominative case. For those of you who find the previous sentence baffling, let me just say that this is a very basic beginning in Latin and is not considered very extensive by some (such as Kolbe Academy). Lessons include introduction of familiar Latin phrases (such as Semper fidelis and Anno Domini) and work with derivatives - English words that come from Latin words in each lesson. It is difficult for me to make further judgements for two reasons: 1. I have not yet used this program extensively with my own children (we started it with my oldest, but she was a little too young) and 2. Because I have already studied Latin, it is hard for me to judge how “user-friendly” this program is. Most people I have talked to have been very pleased with this program (which is recommended for 3rd grade and up).

Available from Emmanuel Books or Catholic Heritage Curricula

For an adult, you cannot do any better than to work through John F. Collins, Primer of Ecclesiastical Latin. I studied classical Latin and Greek for three years each in college, and Collins’s book is absolutely clear, precise, and easily understandable. Buy it and work through it: you will be happy you did. ($17.95, softcover)

Good luck learning latin :thumbsup:

Where do you live? Could be a good class in your area.

Another source for Latin audio tapes is Familia Sancti Hieronymi * , especially their Course on the Living Latin Language. It is among several items in my library of schemes-to-recover-the-high-school-Latin-I-allowed-to-lapse-half-a-lifetime-ago-stupid-stupid-stupid. :banghead:

While there is no audio, if you have the wherewithal there is an excellent mailing list for collaborative Latin study, details at Aspergonem. It is decidedly not a Catholic list, but there is a group working through the Collins text, as well as one that translates bits of the Vulgate. The bread-and-butter of the list is groups working through Wheelock’s Latin (a new one of which is starting RIGHT NOW send me a private message if you want more information).

(* Also no audio, or only available at an extra cost, but I must plug the best refresher course among my schemes, a slim little volume by Peter Jones entitled Learn Latin – It is fab!)

Fortunam bonam!
tee

[quote=tee_eff_em]It is among several items in my library of schemes-to-recover-the-high-school-Latin-I-allowed-to-lapse-half-a-lifetime-ago-stupid-stupid-stupid.* :banghead:

Fortunam bonam!
tee
[/quote]

So, I’m not the only one who let their high-school Latin lapse?

One thing… learning Latin did a whole heckuva lot more good for me in my English grammar than my English 101 class.

And now I are a writer for a living! :stuck_out_tongue:

And sometimes I grab one of my two little-bitty English-Latin dictionaries that I kept.

Oh, yeh. That’s right. My high school Latin textbook had to get returned to my high school because the Latin teacher (who officially was the high school’s French teacher teaching Latin on her lunch hour) borrowed our textbooks from the neighboring school district. Our school district never had a Latin class. Until the one our high school French teacher started one up at our high school.

We didn’t start off with amo, amat, amant. No. :o

We started off with puerto, puertat, etc.

(see? I forget even that part! yikes!)
:o

Well, in the meantime you could always do a cross-check on vocabulary by reading the Bible posted at the Vatican’s Web site.

Here’s the online version Bible in Latin:

Nova Vulgata - Bibliorum Sacrorum Editio

vatican.va/archive/bible/nova_vulgata/documents/nova-vulgata_index_lt.html

John 3:16

16 Sic enim dilexit Deus mundum, ut Filium suum unigenitum daret, ut omnis, qui credit in eum, non pereat, sed habeat vitam aeternam.

vatican.va/archive/bible/nova_vulgata/documents/nova-vulgata_nt_evang-ioannem_lt.html

P.S. If it gets too mind-bending, you can always just reference these sites:

Common Latin terms: :o
depthome.brooklyn.cuny.edu/classics/englatin.htm

English-Latin dictionary listings: :clapping:
arts.cuhk.edu.hk/Lexis/Latin/

And the quintissential Handy Latin Phrases site: :stuck_out_tongue: :rolleyes:
bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/alabaster/A218882

My favorite Latin quote is this one:

*Canis meus id comedit * – My dog ate it!

Latin’s not so hard.

Latin:
Vah! Denuone latine loquebar? Me ineptum. Interdum modo elabitur.

**English: **
Oh! Was I speaking Latin again? Silly me. Sometimes it just sort of slips out.
:stuck_out_tongue:

[quote=Veronica Anne]Well, in the meantime you could always do a cross-check on vocabulary by reading the Bible posted at the Vatican’s Web site.

Here’s the online version Bible in Latin:

Nova Vulgata - Bibliorum Sacrorum Editio

vatican.va/archive/bible/nova_vulgata/documents/nova-vulgata_index_lt.html

John 3:16

16 Sic enim dilexit Deus mundum, ut Filium suum unigenitum daret, ut omnis, qui credit in eum, non pereat, sed habeat vitam aeternam.

vatican.va/archive/bible/nova_vulgata/documents/nova-vulgata_nt_evang-ioannem_lt.html

[/quote]

That was the advice of one of my old Latin teachers*: “Get yourself a Vulgate and read the Gospel of John because (a) You already know the story and (b) John repeats himself an awful lot – you usually get two or three chances to figure out what he’s saying.” :stuck_out_tongue:

(* He is a polyglot and swears he uses this method whenever he tackles a new language)

Learning a new language is hard (believe me I know! I’m only 17 and I’m studying Japanese, Spanish, and American Sign Language) I’m not Catholic, and I do not speak Latin, however, a good rule of thumb is to immerse yourself into the language…hope that helped!

Peace,

Poprox “God chooses those who are weak to confound those who are mighty”

It’s a little hard to immerse when it is a dead language. :eek:

I took 3 years in high school and while I understand a lot of it, I can’t translate from English to Latin very well. Too many rules.

I can say my prayers in Latin and that is good for me. :thumbsup:

I do intend on learning Latin. Here is a highly recommended source that looks really good. blitz.goldrush.com/chcweb/shopcart/html/Lc1.htm

[quote=copland]I do intend on learning Latin. Here is a highly recommended source that looks really good. blitz.goldrush.com/chcweb/shopcart/html/Lc1.htm
[/quote]

Wow! Been AGES since I’ve seen or used any flash cards! “They” still have em, then!?

Veronica Anne,

Ohh, let me tell you! Flash cards were my saving grace when learning Greek! Sometimes the old tricks work better then anything!

Flash cards for art history were the best thing.

I wouldn’t recomend the Latina Christiana for adult study.

Henle would be a good choice, but it isn’t on tape.

Honestly though I would say that study of Latin would be difficult without reading and writing it.

-D

[quote=darcee]Honestly though I would say that study of Latin would be difficult without reading and writing it.

[/quote]

And yet, somehow, Roman infants managed to do it. :wink:

(How come there’s never a Roman infant around when you need one? :stuck_out_tongue: )

But in seriousness, your point is well taken. I used to have a cool vocabulary word – which is escaping me at the moment :banghead: – from an author who wrote about Latin that it is not a dead language but a [cool-vocabulary-word] language, meaning that it is not spoken by anyone who cannot also read and write it.

Hehehe. Check this out! 105live.vaticanradio.org/en_latin.html Vatican Radio has an English/Latin program hosted by the Pope’s own Latinist who has dubbed himself “The Latin Lover.” Hehehehehehehehehe :rotfl:

[quote=tee_eff_em]But in seriousness, your point is well taken. I used to have a cool vocabulary word – which is escaping me at the moment :banghead: – from an author who wrote about Latin that it is not a dead language but a [cool-vocabulary-word] language, meaning that it is not spoken by anyone who cannot also read and write it.
[/quote]

Woo-hoo! When I was at the library today, I remembered to dig up the reference. From the essay “Latin and the Social Fabric”, collected in *The Barbarian Within * by Walter J Ong, SJ (emphasis of cool vocabulary word mine):

Latin became first a chirographic language and later, to some extent, a typographic language. That is to say, it became a language in which all oral expression was (at least theoretically) controlled by written expression, and later, to some extent, by typographic expression. … What was distinctive of Latin was not that it was “dead” but that there was no one who could speak it who could not also write it.

tee

It’s a touch pricey for my blood, but Steubenville offered an intensive latin course this summer. If we had the money and the time off, my husband and I both would have done it.

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