I was a Sinful Atheist. I feel like I sinned too much to be truly Saved.

I feel like I don’t deserve to be a Catholic in a way, since I have done very sinful things.

I feel like a hypocrite. I want to be a very religious Catholic, but my past haunts me even after Confession…It makes me sad that I have turned people away from God…It pains me.

I was the type of Atheist that said to other people to abandon their faiths.
I knew many that have abandoned their faiths, including relatives in my own family. I feel like that’s the most horrible Mortal Sin that I have committed.

I have said the most horrible things about Catholicism and other religions…I truly regret it.

I have been like this for the past 17 years of my life. I am 25 right now.
(I went through most of the Catholic Sacraments as a child including Confirmation…which I didn’t really believe in as a child)

Maybe Satan was in me through all those years. I feel doomed that I wont be cleansed enough for Heaven at the end of my mortal life.

What can I do about this?
Will Confession truly cleanse me of this? Any prayers that I should pray daily?

I really want help with this.

We are all sinners. Welcome back!

Try this site. I found the videos and information very useful.

catholicscomehome.org/

Also start attending Mass. You will get closer to God.

I will pray that you will be blessed more.

Thank you so much for that. :hug1:

The unforgivable sin is believing God cannot/will not forgive you.

 The message of mercy is that God loves us — all of us —
no matter how great our sins. He wants us to recognize that
His mercy is greater than our sins, so that we will call upon
Him with trust, receive His mercy, and let it flow through us to
others. Thus, all will come to share His joy. It is a message
we can call to mind simply by remembering ABC.
        **A** — Ask for His Mercy. God wants us to approach
Him in prayer constantly, repenting of our sins and
asking Him to pour His mercy out upon us and upon
the whole world.
        **B** — Be merciful. God wants us to receive His mercy
and let it flow through us to others. He wants us to
extend love and forgiveness to others just as He does
to us.
        **C** — Completely trust in Jesus. God wants us to know
that the graces of His mercy are dependent upon our
trust. The more we trust in Jesus, the more we will
receive.

Divine Mercy

This was from the homily by Pope Francis for Divine Mercy Sunday, 2013:

"…I am always struck when I reread the parable of the merciful Father; it impresses me because it always gives me great hope. Think of that younger son who was in the Father’s house, who was loved; and yet he wants his part of the inheritance; he goes off, spends everything, hits rock bottom, where he could not be more distant from the Father, yet when he is at his lowest, he misses the warmth of the Father’s house and he goes back. And the Father? Had he forgotten the son? No, never. He is there, he sees the son from afar, he was waiting for him every hour of every day, the son was always in his father’s heart, even though he had left him, even though he had squandered his whole inheritance, his freedom. The Father, with patience, love, hope and mercy, had never for a second stopped thinking about him, and as soon as he sees him still far off, he runs out to meet him and embraces him with tenderness, the tenderness of God, without a word of reproach: he has returned! And that is the joy of the Father. In that embrace for his son is all this joy: he has returned! God is always waiting for us, he never grows tired. Jesus shows us this merciful patience of God so that we can regain confidence, hope – always! A great German theologian, Romano Guardini, said that God responds to our weakness by his patience, and this is the reason for our confidence, our hope (cf. Glaubenserkenntnis, Würzburg, 1949, p. 28). It is like a dialogue between our weakness and the patience of God, it is a dialogue that, if we do it, will grant us hope.

I would like to emphasize one other thing: God’s patience has to call forth in us the courage to return to him, however many mistakes and sins there may be in our life. Jesus tells Thomas to put his hand in the wounds of his hands and his feet, and in his side. We too can enter into the wounds of Jesus, we can actually touch him. This happens every time that we receive the sacraments with faith. Saint Bernard, in a fine homily, says: “Through the wounds of Jesus I can suck honey from the rock and oil from the flinty rock (cf. Deut 32:13), I can taste and see the goodness of the Lord” (On the Song of Songs, 61:4). It is there, in the wounds of Jesus, that we are truly secure; there we encounter the boundless love of his heart. Thomas understood this. Saint Bernard goes on to ask: But what can I count on? My own merits? No, “My merit is God’s mercy. I am by no means lacking merits as long as he is rich in mercy. If the mercies of the Lord are manifold, I too will abound in merits” (ibid., 5). This is important: the courage to trust in Jesus’ mercy, to trust in his patience, to seek refuge always in the wounds of his love. Saint Bernard even states: “So what if my conscience gnaws at me for my many sins? ‘Where sin has abounded, there grace has abounded all the more’ (Rom 5:20)” (ibid.). Maybe someone among us here is thinking: my sin is so great, I am as far from God as the younger son in the parable, my unbelief is like that of Thomas; I don’t have the courage to go back, to believe that God can welcome me and that he is waiting for me, of all people. But God is indeed waiting for you; he asks of you only the courage to go to him. How many times in my pastoral ministry have I heard it said: “Father, I have many sins”; and I have always pleaded: “Don’t be afraid, go to him, he is waiting for you, he will take care of everything”. We hear many offers from the world around us; but let us take up God’s offer instead: his is a caress of love. For God, we are not numbers, we are important, indeed we are the most important thing to him; even if we are sinners, we are what is closest to his heart.

Adam, after his sin, experiences shame, he feels naked, he senses the weight of what he has done; and yet God does not abandon him: if that moment of sin marks the beginning of his exile from God, there is already a promise of return, a possibility of return. God immediately asks: “Adam, where are you?” He seeks him out. Jesus took on our nakedness, he took upon himself the shame of Adam, the nakedness of his sin, in order to wash away our sin: by his wounds we have been healed. Remember what Saint Paul says: "What shall I boast of, if not my weakness, my poverty? Precisely in feeling my sinfulness, in looking at my sins, I can see and encounter God’s mercy, his love, and go to him to receive forgiveness.

In my own life, I have so often seen God’s merciful countenance, his patience; I have also seen so many people find the courage to enter the wounds of Jesus by saying to him: Lord, I am here, accept my poverty, hide my sin in your wounds, wash it away with your blood. And I have always seen that God did just this – he accepted them, consoled them, cleansed them, loved them.

Dear brothers and sisters, let us be enveloped by the mercy of God; let us trust in his patience, which always gives us more time. Let us find the courage to return to his house, to dwell in his loving wounds, allowing ourselves be loved by him and to encounter his mercy in the sacraments. We will feel his wonderful tenderness, we will feel his embrace, and we too will become more capable of mercy, patience, forgiveness and love."

w2.vatican.va/content/francesco/en/homilies/2013/documents/papa-francesco_20130407_omelia-possesso-cattedra-laterano.html

I am grateful to him who has strengthened me, Christ Jesus our Lord, because he considered me trustworthy in appointing me to the ministry. I was once a blasphemer and a persecutor and an arrogant man, but I have been mercifully treated because I acted out of ignorance in my unbelief. Indeed, the grace of our Lord has been abundant, along with the faith and love that are in Christ Jesus. This saying is trustworthy and deserves full acceptance: Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners. Of these I am the foremost. But for that reason I was mercifully treated, so that in me, as the foremost, Christ Jesus might display all his patience as an example for those who would come to believe in him for everlasting life. To the king of ages, incorruptible, invisible, the only God, honor and glory forever and ever. Amen. 1 Tim 1:12-17

From the blog “True Confessions of a Prodigal Daughter”
catholicprodigaldaughter.blogspot.com/2009/08/frfriday-father-felix-leseur-unlikely.html

Last year, Angela M. (Where Angels Blog) introduced me to Servant of God, Elisabeth Leseur. I had no idea who she was at the time, but I quickly became entranced by her story.

Elisabeth was a devout Catholic. She married a Catholic man, Felix Leseur, whom she discovered shortly before they married that he was no longer a practicing Catholic. Felix became a doctor, and eventually, an anti-clerical, atheist. Although he assured Elisabeth that he would not interfere with her faith, he ended up belittling it, even going so far as to try to destroy it.

Elisabeth was undaunted. She dutifully read a book he gave her, his intention being to draw her away from her faith. He was shocked to learn that she only found a lack of substance in the book and became even more devoted to Christianity. Their home soon had two libraries - his was full of book about atheism and hers was filled with the lives of the saints and the Catholic Church.

In 1912, at the age of 46, Elisabeth was diagnosed with breast cancer. During a conversation with Dr. Leseur about death, she said, “I am absolutely certain that when you return to God, you will not stop on the way because you never do things by halves… You will some day become a priest.” To this he responded: “Elizabeth, you know my sentiments. I’ve sworn hatred of God, I shall live in the hatred and I shall die in it.”

After she died in 1914, Dr. Leseur discovered a note written to him in her papers. It said: “In 1905, I asked almighty God to send me sufficient sufferings to purchase your soul. On the day that I die, the price will have been paid. Greater love than this no woman has than she who lay down her life for her husband.”

Dr. Leseur intended to visit Lourdes with the intention of writing a book to discredit it. But after he was there, he became deeply convicted by the sacrifices his wife had made on his behalf, and it led to contemplating what Jesus Christ had done for him. Not too long after, Dr. Leseur’s resistance to God crumbled. In 1919, he became a Dominican novice and in 1923, at the age of 62, he was ordained. He became an inspiration to Archbishop Fulton Sheen, who frequently referenced the redemptive story of the Leseur’s as an example of how marriage can sanctify a spouse.

Fr. Felix Leseur spent 27 years traveling and preaching about his wife’s spiritual writings. What an amazing testimony of sacrificial love and grace; and how astounding to know that such a man eventually became a spiritual director for an Archbishop. God bless Fr. Leseur!

You’re in very excellent company. St. Paul persecuted Christians and sent some of them, such as St. Stephen, to their deaths. St. Ignatius of Loyola was a “blood knight” warrior who lived for battle. Saint Nicholas was stripped of his see for a time after punching Arius in the face – during an ecumenical council. Saint Mary of Egypt was a prostitute who “slept her way” to the Holy Land. St. Francis of Assisi was a playboy, wannabe soldier and stole from his father. St. Thomas Becket was a carouser and notorious “party buddy” of King Henry II.

St. Augustine, whose feast day we celebrate today, wrote an entire book, The Confessions on his sinful life, detailing everything from stealing pears to having multiple mistresses and even apostasy from the faith.

St. Peter, our first Pope, denied Christ three times and fled for his own life rather than stand by Him during His passion and crucifixion.

They were sinners. They are also saints. A saint is not a person who’s sinless from birth – exactly two people on this fallen earth fit that description: Jesus and the Blessed Virgin Mary. A saint is someone who realizes his or her sinfulness and turns to a better path. Saints are sinners who have gotten up again and repented. It’s hard to see through the stained glass and hagiography (not helped by “helpful” redactors later on who wanted to burnish the saint’s reputation) the real people, their struggles, their faults, their failings.

So it is with you. No person is too fallen for God. If Christ could forgive St. Peter, why can’t he forgive you? You still have a shot at being St. Returner. :thumbsup:

:frowning:

:frowning:

http://s17.postimg.org/d1tz8vwe7/Prodigal_Son.jpg

Jesus to St. Faustina -

"…when you go to confession, to this fountain of My mercy, the Blood and Water which came forth from My Heart always flows down upon your soul and ennobles it. Every time you go to confession, immerse yourself entirely in My mercy, with great trust, so that I may pour the bounty of My grace upon your soul. When you approach the confessional, know this, that I myself am waiting there for you. I am only hidden by the priest, but I myself act in your soul. Here the misery of the soul meets the God of mercy. Souls draw graces solely with the vessel of trust. If their trust is great, there is no limit to My generosity. The torrents of grace inundate humble souls." (Diary, 1603).

"Tell souls where they are to look for solace; that is, in the Tribunal of Mercy. There the greatest miracles take place (and) are incessantly repeated. To avail oneself of this miracle, it is not necessary to go on a great pilgrimage or to carry out some external ceremony; it suffices to come with faith to the feet of My representative (The Church, Confession) and to reveal to him one’s misery and the miracle of Divine Mercy will be fully demonstrated. Were a soul like a decaying corpse so that from a human standpoint, there would be no (hope of) restoration and everything would already be lost, it is not so with God. The miracle of Divine Mercy restores that soul in full." (1448)

"Tell sinful souls not to be afraid to approach Me; speak to them of My great mercy" (Diary, 1396).

"I never reject a contrite heart." (Diary, 1485).

I hope this has helped. God Bless You.

Thank you for reading
Josh

I was a private devotional Satanist for a while and I wanted to join a cult. The only reason I didn’t is because I didn’t know how. I influenced my best friend to worship Satan as well. (She stopped when I stopped thankfully.) I didn’t deserve to be forgiven any more than you–rather even less so, but that didn’t stop God from forgiving me anyway. Jesus would have suffered and died the way He did if only to save a single person–including you. Confession is indeed all you need to be cleansed of sin. There is one other obligation related to your sin though and that is that you pray for the people you led to Atheism. I would pray like mad for my friend if she was still worshiping Satan.

What these guys said ^.

“Do not abandon yourselves to despair. We are the Easter people and hallelujah is our song.”
“I plead with you! Never, ever give up on hope, never doubt, never tire, and never become discouraged. Be not afraid.”
“If He asks much of you, it is because He knows you can give much.”

  • St Pope John Paul II

You haven’t sinned too much to be forgiven–no way.
Of course you are forgiven.
You can go to heaven.
You are not doomed at all!
Of course you can be Catholic of ya wanna be!

.

Welcome returner!

The above posters have offered much good advice. I second it all. God bless you!

Welcome back. Sincerely!

What you are experiencing right now is a ‘feeling’ and forgiveness is a decision. One to be made every day, several times a day if necessary.

It is a warped sense of pride that causes us to feel despair because we judge ourselves by our standards and ideals…not God’s.

With the grace that comes with living an authentically catholic life, the ‘feeling’ will subside!

Promise.

Praying to the Holy Spirit to give you guidance, direction, strength, fortitude & wisdom in your time of need.

I have read every post that everyone has made and I understand now. My eyes have been opened and I can see. I love being Catholic.

I truly thank all of you, everyone is so wonderful here. May God bless you all.

I will pray for everyone whom I led in the wrong direction in my life. I will do everything to help them.

I will pray, read more scripture, and go to Mass tomorrow.

It is people like you that make the best converts. We all came here with a truckful of sinful baggage! The biggest detractors make the best case for being Catholic to others who have walked the very same path you have! I am glad you are here! Welcome!

I was also going to tell you that a good friend for you would be Saint Paul, like PatPayne said… Also you have other great responses that should give you encouragement and hope. Once we finally realize that we have sinned against the good God, it is normal to wonder how He can love us after all we have done. We cry and we pray, pray, pray. Don’t give up, because all you have to do is desire to love God and He will accept you. Then, go and sin no more. Get to confession. You are forgiven. Love God first place in your life and love your neighbor as yourself… Welcome and may God bless you with strength, faith, peace, hope and love…

Returner;12294396]I feel like I don’t deserve to be a Catholic in a way, since I have done very sinful things.

I feel like a hypocrite. I want to be a very religious Catholic, but my past haunts me even after Confession…It makes me sad that I have turned people away from God…It pains me.

I was the type of Atheist that said to other people to abandon their faiths.
I knew many that have abandoned their faiths, including relatives in my own family. I feel like that’s the most horrible Mortal Sin that I have committed.

I have said the most horrible things about Catholicism and other religions…I truly regret it.

I have been like this for the past 17 years of my life. I am 25 right now.
(I went through most of the Catholic Sacraments as a child including Confirmation…which I didn’t really believe in as a child)

Maybe Satan was in me through all those years. I feel doomed that I wont be cleansed enough for Heaven at the end of my mortal life.

What can I do about this?
Will Confession truly cleanse me of this? Any prayers that I should pray daily?

I really want help with this.

EVERY SIN AND EVERY SINNER CAN BE FORGIVEN WITH A GOOD CATHOLIC CONFESSION!

I suggest you speak to a priest by appointment.

READ 1 John 1: 8-10
I John 5: 16-17
John 20: 19-23

Forgiveness begins with forgiving OURSELVES!:slight_smile:

Don’t allow Satan to abuse you! PRAY MUCH! Especially the Rosary and the Divine Chaplet of Mercy

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