I Was Beat Up by a Bunch of Baptisits

Like the others, pray for the conversion of these obviously close minded, ignorant people. Do the best you can to point out the FACT that the Catholic church is the one true church instituted by Jesus Christ and that her church was once part of it. There comes a point after that in which you must simply “Shake the dust from your shoes” and move on.

Situations like this are always difficult for me. I’ve come to recognize that some people are meant to be apologists and some are meant to be catechists. When I try to be an apologist I end up doing more harm than good, so I concentrate more on trying to catechize Catholics in their faith. There certainly is quite a need for that today.

[quote=carol marie]When is this Aunt’s birthday? I think a perfect gift mailed to her home would be a basic Catholic apologetic type book. Maybe Rome Sweet Home or Born Fundamentalist Born Again Catholic. Enclose a note offering to answer any questions she has after reading it. Tell her that you are praying that she will come to the full knowledge of the truth regarding the Christ’s Church. Then sign it -

All our love,

Best to fight back with kindness. If it doesn’t change them, it will sure drive them nuts!
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I am the only Catholic in a family of Evengelicals. The book idea worked for my parents, but it was “pearls before swine” for my siblings.

Dasher,
Be strong and start reading the CCC:
christusrex.org/www1/CDHN/ccc.html

and get involved with your church and Catholic Ministries.

I’ve learned a LOT from reading Karl Keating’s “Catholicism and Fundamentalism.” Defending the beliefs of the Catholic Church can grow frustrating because many of the one-liner objections offered by anti-Catholics often take so long to explain. Not only that, but because the Church appeals so often to extra-Biblical sources, there’s no common ground with people who believe in the Bible only.

What a strange position I’m in… defending the Catholic Church against the misconceptions of fellow Baptists… :slight_smile:

Dan

[quote=Dasher]I am a cradle Catholic. I just returned to the West from a trip to Tennessee where I went with my wife and in-laws to visit their family. On several occassions I overheard my wife’s aunt (a Baptisit) criticize the Catholic Church. First she said that all the ritual, ie., communion, bells, candles, (her words) etc were “a bunch of garbage.” Then the discussion turned to the recent death of John Paul II (who has been my personal hero for over 20 years) and the succession of Benedict XVI and that all of the ceremony that was associated with it was a clear indication that the Pope and not Christ was the head of the Catholic Church and that the Pope had replaced Christ… I’m not an apologist, but I do have a very good knowledge of Catholicism. As I tried (calmly) to explain the role of the Pope as the successor of Peter for the Catholic Church on earth, I was bombarded with demands to explain why, then we pray to the Pope? I explained that Catholics do NOT pray to the Pope. I explained that we pray FOR the Pope, but the conversation went nowhere. I was then asked why we (Catholics) leave Christ on the Cross in our churches and several jokes were made about it. I was very mad. I feel like I was just ran over and made a fool of by people who refused to listen and felt they knew more about the “true” Catholic Church than I did. I felt like an outcast. I felt belittled and I was super angry! As a sign of my devotion to my faith, I wore my crucifix outside my shirt for the rest of the trip. I never knew there were so many misconceptions and closed minded people out there. They said that they would “pray for me” because Catholicism was like “a cult.” I simply said, “I will pray for you too!” This was a week ago and I’m still so FRUSTRATED by it!!! What is there to do???
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I’m very sorry that you had this experience. All you can do is explain your faith as best as you are able gently and with love.
If they mock you, pray for them and go on your way.

They persecuted Jesus too!

Peace

[quote=dhgray]I am the only Catholic in a family of Evengelicals. The book idea worked for my parents, but it was “pearls before swine” for my siblings.
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I’m inclined to believe that evangelistic efforts are more likely to be lost people who act like this. One-to-one, personal, relational evangelism often works better in these situations.

As an aside, there’s something that’s always confused me about the Catholic Church. I’ve been a Protestant Christian for about 8 years or so, and I’ve never had a flesh-and-blood Catholic (and there are 1.5 million of them in this Archdiocese) defend the teachings of the Church with nearly as much clarity as has been done on these forums. In fact, I’ve been evangelizing them about what their church teaches, and many of them have some really strange misconceptions about their own faith.

Travel advice:

If you go fishing, invite two Baptists. That way they won’t drink your beer.

Alan

P.S. Actual story – me, beer, and a Baptist:

Several years ago I was not completely aware of other cultures when I exercised my Pauline privileges. In short, I lacked multicultural sensitivity.

It seems like coworkers always pick spring time, Lent, to start wanting to go out together for lunch on Fridays. Pizza Hut had a buffet and they kept a pretty good assortment of non-meat pizzas for me and a few other Catholics (plus some vegans) there.

A Baptist (slightly cynical of Catholics) who was known to drink when not with other Baptists sat down by me with his pizza, fully meat-laden. His eyes grew large as he said, “you can’t eat meat but you can drink a beer?”

Immediately I knew this was a satanic test and of course I had to drink this beer in front of him to fulfill prophecy. But how to tell him that I’m drinking it to evangelize Catholicism to him. Somehow the words found me to say, “yeah, that rocks, doesn’t it? You mean you don’t get to drink beer? What religion is that again?”

He said, “Southern Baptist.” Then he smiled and that was the end of the discussion.

From that day on I never heard him say another negative word about Catholicism…

[quote=djrakowski]I’m inclined to believe that evangelistic efforts are more likely to be lost people who act like this. One-to-one, personal, relational evangelism often works better in these situations.

As an aside, there’s something that’s always confused me about the Catholic Church. I’ve been a Protestant Christian for about 8 years or so, and I’ve never had a flesh-and-blood Catholic (and there are 1.5 million of them in this Archdiocese) defend the teachings of the Church with nearly as much clarity as has been done on these forums. In fact, I’ve been evangelizing them about what their church teaches, and many of them have some really strange misconceptions about their own faith.
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Yes, you are right. For so long, Catholics, in general, have just been complacent with their faith. That’s the reason we’ve lost so many of our family and friends to other Churches. I think we are seeing a re-awakening of the faithful. I see it in my diocese in Beaumont, TX. that is echoing the faith and knowledge shown on these forums. What I feel is that the laiety are initiating this rennaissance from within, rather than waiting for the priests and bishops to do it for us.

God Bless!

NotWorthy

On these forums, I jump all over the place as I try to see things from different sides. I guess everybody thinks I have no consistency but usually that is what I seek in vain.

Outside these forums, when somebody says something anti-Catholic, it’s easy to defend the Church. Since I don’t know that much theology, sometimes I get them to open their baggage a bit so I can help them unload it. A lot of times what they despise about the Catholic Church they really wish they had the freedom to believe and stay whatever they are. Either that or they don’t know how to defend their ambivalance about Catholic beliefs around their own peers. Let them; if the Holy Spirit draws them further so much the better! :slight_smile:

Sometimes these people have to hear the truth in such a way they can “save face” around their own brothers, or else you are applying an obvious wedge. We must be cunning, and plant a subliminal wedge so we won’t raise shield by appearing “pushy.”

One reason people trust secular doctors more than priests because they think the doctors wish to fix their patients and send them on their way, not recruit them for weekly-or-better commitment. Baptists share this same weakness with us, plus they all know what their ministers preach is based on what a congregation will pay them to say. If enough people pressure the pastor, they will either vote him out or change his tune. They would love to have the peace of knowing that in our house certain things are the same all over the globe and over time.

[edit]this is the hard-to-get strategy. Be confident and not wanting about our own Catholicism; if there’s a problem bring it to this forum or someone who can help within the Church preferably. Otherwise don’t let them see us sweat. Take what they say with a pleasant curiosity and always pretend not to completely understand it. Stay indifferent and computer-ish toward what they say and you will not reveal your underlying frustration quite as badly.

Alan

[quote=NotWorthy]Yes, you are right. For so long, Catholics, in general, have just been complacent with their faith. That’s the reason we’ve lost so many of our family and friends to other Churches. I think we are seeing a re-awakening of the faithful. I see it in my diocese in Beaumont, TX. that is echoing the faith and knowledge shown on these forums. What I feel is that the laiety are initiating this rennaissance from within, rather than waiting for the priests and bishops to do it for us.

God Bless!

NotWorthy
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Dear NotWorthy,

Maybe this is too great a goal, but I think this forum is a great place to see how much impact we can make with so many heterodox minds all (even the cynics) striving to discover Truth and find peace in their own ways. If we can lower our arguments to a dull roar, it will be like part of the mind in the Body of Christ taking a tranquilizer to control schizophrenic conflicting beliefs. Once we quiet the emotional ourbursts, hurt, resentment, confusion-turned-fear-turned-anxiety, and whatever communications problems we have then we will be making progress toward meaningful unity talks.

Gosh, if all of us are going to devote our valuable time to posting here, and all of us for the glory of God, what would show it best for us to show we can “just all get along” despite our differences in beliefs. We don’t softpedal the importance of those differences, but also learn how to share them without getting emotions all flared up. Would you listen more to a religion teacher who snapped any time you asked a question he found difficult to field, or one who listened and treated you like a human being and that you obviously asked for a good reason other than to ruin her day or defame her credentials?

Alan

I am a former Baptist myself. You must forgive those who are woefully ignorant of our faith. Most Protestants who strike out at Catholicism don’t know what they are talking about anyway. The best thing to do with belligerent people is to quit talking to them. They only want to argue and put you down.

                           If someone is **civil**, then that is the person to calmly discuss your beliefs with. Listen carefully to what they are actually saying and think before you answer. Answer them with simple answers and try not to get to "theological". My pet phrase when talking with a person with differing views is, "I understand what you're saying, BUT......., This way you are acknowledging the person you are talking with.

                           I have a heavy road to travel as you do. My son is a still a die hard Baptist and confronts me at every chance. I love him very much and he loves me. But we discuss our religions in a respectful manner. That is the key. If both parties do not respect the other, then it is a total waste of your time and theirs. A convinced mind will remain convinced, unless one is willing to at least listen.

As a Tennessean, I can totally relate to what you are saying. Our great state has the least amount of Catholics, percentage wise in the entire nation. It is very hard to be a Catholic here.

I’m a convert from the Church of Christ, just like Lisa4Catholics. They and Baptists really beleive that they have cornered the market on the “true” church. You just have to let it roll off your back and always be prepared debate with charity. On another note, I heard this joke the other day and wanted to share it with the board:

[font=‘Kristen ITC’]FOUR RELIGIOUS TRUTHS[/font]


[font=‘Kristen ITC’]1.*** ******Muslims do not recognize Jews as God’s chosen people. ***[/font]


[font=‘Kristen ITC’]2.*** ******Jews do not recognize Jesus as the Messiah. ***[/font]


[font=‘Kristen ITC’]3.*** ******Protestants do not recognize the Pope as the leader of the Christian World.***[/font]


[font=‘Kristen ITC’]4.*** ******Baptists do not recognize each other at liquor stores or casinos.***[/font]

:smiley:

ouch.

:rotfl:

[quote=Dasher]I was bombarded with demands to explain why, then we pray to the Pope? I explained that Catholics do NOT pray to the Pope. I explained that we pray FOR the Pope,
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Unlike Catholics at least; they don’t know what the word “pray” means…

According to Merriam-Webster it means:

Main Entry: pray
Pronunciation: 'prA
Function: verb
Etymology: Middle English, from Old French *preier, *from Latin *precari, *from *prec-, prex *request, prayer; akin to Old High German *frAgEn *to ask, Sanskrit *prcchati *he asks
transitive tenses
1 : ENTREAT, IMPLORE – often used as a function word in introducing a question, request, or plea <pray be careful>
2 : to get or bring by praying
intransitive tenses
1 : to make a request in a humble manner
2 : to address God or a god with adoration, confession, supplication, or thanksgiving

Here’s the irony: According to the first definition they were praying to you by “introducing a question”.

I’m sorry you were put through that (I’ve been there too) but, they may not realize that words have meanings beyond one definition; buy them dictionaries and say a prayer for them.

[quote=Genesis315]Plus, it was His suffering and Death which redeemed us. The Resurrection is the fruits.
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Can someone explain to me what ‘The Resurrection is the fruits’ means in more concrete terms. I get told a lot by my baptist friend that Catholics can’t get past a ‘bloody Jesus on the cross’ and would like to be able expand on what Genesis315 said above.

[quote=Elzee]Can someone explain to me what ‘The Resurrection is the fruits’ means in more concrete terms. I get told a lot by my baptist friend that Catholics can’t get past a ‘bloody Jesus on the cross’ and would like to be able expand on what Genesis315 said above.
[/quote]

Well (and if I have it wrong I’m sorry and I ask somebody to correct me) the idea is that just as Jesus’ death and sacrifice allows us all to have eternal life, it also allowed Jesus himself to have it. This gets very confusing, but basically, because of the sacrifice Christ made on the cross, even he himself was able to be raised.

That part I may have wrong. This part I don’t:

Pentecost and the Holy Spirit were the fruits because it was Christ’s sacrifice that brought the Holy Spirit to us so that we could have it.

[quote=Malachi4U]Yep, it sure sounds like they are Baptists. Don’t feel bad, many of them are taught to hate Catholics and lied to about what Catholic Faith is. W
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On the bright side, many are not like this, but only misinformed. Since I have been here at CAF, it amazes me how many, like myself, are Baptist converts.

Dasher,
Ask them why they use grape juice instead of wine for Communion.
I find they hate the topic of alcohol a lot, almost paranoid. I like to show them the passages that make it clear alcoholic drink is in the Bible and its not a sin. And while your at it take out a beer and note the look on their face, im not kidding they look at you as if your doing something evil.

[quote=Elzee]Can someone explain to me what ‘The Resurrection is the fruits’ means in more concrete terms. I get told a lot by my baptist friend that Catholics can’t get past a ‘bloody Jesus on the cross’ and would like to be able expand on what Genesis315 said above.
[/quote]

Lazerlike said it well.

The Crucifixion is the price that was paid for our sins. As a result of that price the Resurrection (including our own resurrection eventually) is made possible.

We “can’t get by a bloody Jesus on the Cross” because it is the most powerful image of God’s love for us. The greatest act of love is self-sacrifice, and that’s just what Jesus did.

Dasher, the good news is that you get to see these folks again, and you can be prepared better for it when it happens. Don’t let this experience go to waste, but rather think about it, and study your faith so next time you can be ready with an answer.

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