'I was just waiting for an OK from God': Buffalo woman sues to stop presidential election


#1

Buffalo News:

’I was just waiting for an OK from God’: Buffalo woman sues to stop presidential election

Louise K. Nolley of Buffalo is trying to stop the presidential election from happening on Tuesday.In a lawsuit she filed this week in federal court in Buffalo, Nolley contends that neither Donald Trump nor Hillary Clinton is suitably qualified for the office. She requests the election be postponed until such time as more worthy candidates can be drafted to run.
“Neither of the candidates running for the Presidential seat shows that they can handle the position,” her lawsuit states, adding that “the character of both candidates falls far below” the standards needed.
Nolley said she is hopeful that President Obama can be persuaded to remain in office, possibly for a third full term which, of course, would be a violation of the 22nd Amendment to the Constitution that limits presidents to only two terms.
While this may sound like a frivolous lawsuit, Nolley assured us that it isn’t.

“I’ve been writing on it and thinking about it and praying. I was just waiting for an OK from God,” Nolley said in a brief phone interview.
She got that OK sometime in the past week and filed the lawsuit on Tuesday.
Nolley, at 62, has a personal reason for trying to stop the election. She is a recovering heroin addict with a lengthy arrest and prison record. As a result, she said she has not been able to vote for president her entire adult life, until now.
“This is the first time I’ll ever get a chance to vote, and I just wanted it to mean something for me and other people who really need a leader,” said Nolley, who developed skills as a paralegal while incarcerated.
“So I really want to make a difference and do something different.”
If her lawsuit fails, Nolley vowed to not vote for either presidential candidate and just vote on the down ballot races.


#2

How much more twisted can this election get??

I doubt she has standing and the case should be dismissed.

ICXC NIKA


#3

I can’t imagine things getting more twisted than this, but then again you never know. I agree the case should be dismissed.


#4

:rotfl::rotfl:


#5

Ok, her 15 minutes are up now; can we PLEASE get this election over with? :banghead:


#6

There is a lot of essential reading to read.

Read the Federalist Papers. They are adverts that the Founding Fathers placed in the newspapers to explain why the Constitution was a good thing.

They talked/wrote at length how/why the system of elections was established.

Direct election of the House of Representatives.

Senate selected by the State Legislatures. Decentralizes power. [But the 17th Amendment takes power away from the states.][Arguably, we should repeal the 17th Amendment.]

President [chief administrator] selected by the electors to protect the rights of small states.

By the way, the President is supposed to be an almost worthless job. Congress MAKES THE LAWS. Congress has jurisdiction over the Federal Courts. Congress declares war and funds the military. The President MERELY carries out the laws issued by Congress.

The arguments and points they wrote about back then are still valid today.

We have had strange elections before.

Read up on a guy named Aaron Burr … He was a war hero. He lost a leg in combat and at West Point there is a monument to that leg. Became vice president of the United States. Charged with treason. Killed Alexander Hamilton who was a financial genius and maybe a savior of the United States finances.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aaron_Burr

Read “None Dare Call It Treason” by John A. Stormer.

But not just this strange in our lifetimes.*


#7

How does changing who elects senators take power away from the states. The state of New York chooses its senators whether it they are chosen by the legislature or the people. Given the type of people who serve in state legislatures, there is no reason to suppose that they make better decisions that the people.


#8

On one level this seems to beg for a rerun of the “Your brain on drugs” public service television ads. No one is so special that the rules have to be changed for you, even if a lot of heroin has convinced you otherwise.

On another level, there a lot of completely sober people who feel that neither candidate is qualified for their vote. Deciding how to vote in this election should be preceded by a lot of prayer and clear thinking.


#9

The legislature(s) form a debating society. They understand the various issues that impact various parts of the state.

Big cities versus rural farming, for example.

Cities versus mining.

The issues are different.

Rural Pennsylvania, where I have friends, was impoverished. Then the farmers discovered how to “mine” for natural gas. [Pennsylvania has ALWAYS been an oil state.]

Now, rural Pennsylvania is doing relatively well.

But the issues that affect rural Pennsylvania are DIFFERENT from those that affect … Philadelphia … for example.

If the state legislature picks the U.S. senators from Pennsylvania, then they can find someone who is not beholden to the cities. AND, if their U.S. senator starts to fail, then they can replace him (or her). Pennsylvania just fired their Attorney General.

West Virginia with direct election of their [former, now deceased] Senator … Robert Byrd … is impoverished. If they could have voted him out and picked someone more oriented toward economic development might be able to do better. But instead with popular vote, he was able to stay in office for many decades and did not have to explain away his failure to represent his state.


#10

This gave me a good chuckle! :stuck_out_tongue:


#11

[quote=Monte
]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aaron_Burr
[/quote]

Read “None Dare Call It Treason” by John A. Stormer.

But not just this strange in our lifetimes.

I think the leg memorial is actually to commemorate Benedict Arnold’s wound at the battle of Saratoga.

Aaron Burr didn’t lose a leg in the Revolution as far as a couple quick Google searches say, but he did suffer heat stroke at the Battle of Monmouth. And he did shoot Alexander Hamilton.


#12

The only “leg memorial” I know of was for a very “colorful” character of the Civil War, General Dan Sickles. Among his accomplishments, he was the first person in the US to be acquitted of murder on the grounds of temporary insanity. He happened to be a Congressman from New York at the time. He lost his leg at Gettysburg and eventually was awarded the Medal of Honor.

Who would think that a Democrat serving in Congress could be out of his mind?:rolleyes:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Sickles


#13

That’s fascinating. I do so like learning about colorful historical characters.

The statue I was thinking of is actually a boot.
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boot_Monument

I always found it interesting that the erectors of the monument chose not to put Arnold’s name on it. He also has a plaque at Westpoint that only has his rank and date of birth.


#14

Benedict Arnold’s boot memorial statue:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boot_Monument

with photograph.

The memorial was donated by John Watts de Peyster, a former Major General for the New York State Militia during the American Civil War who wrote several military histories about the Battle of Saratoga.

The dedication on the back reads:

"Erected 1887 By

JOHN WATTS de PEYSTER
Brev: Maj: Gen: S.N.Y.
2nd V. Pres’t Saratoga Mon’t ***'t’n:
In memory of
the “most brilliant soldier” of the
Continental Army
who was desperately wounded
on this spot the sally port of
BORGOYNES GREAT WESTERN REDOUBT
7th October, 1777
winning for his countrymen
the decisive battle of the
American Revolution
and for himself the rank of

Major General."

Arnold’s perceived offenses[edit]

Arnold suffered what he considered a series of slights and insults by the Continental Congress several years after Saratoga, as the Revolutionary War continued. He also opposed treaties that brought French military assistance to the Americans.

The wounded Arnold began negotiations with British agents that culminated in his changing sides in September 1780. As part of these negotiations, Arnold attempted unsuccessfully to hand his American command over to the British, the key fortification of West Point.

This attempt failed because of the capture of Major John André, and Arnold escaped to the British lines, was given the rank of a British brigadier general, and the British exchequer paid him £6,000.

An apocryphal story that has circulated in various versions states:

When Benedict Arnold was leading the forces of the King against his former compatriots in Virginia, among his prisoners was a certain plucky and witty officer, who, in answer to Arnold’s question, “What will the Americans do with me if they catch me?” replied, “They will cut off the leg which was wounded when you were fighting so gloriously for the cause of liberty, and bury it with the honors of war, and hang the rest of your body on a gibbet.”[1]
Benedict Arnold is not mentioned by name on the Boot Monument; the monument thus serves as a form of damnatio memoriae.

Someday perhaps the Clintons will be just a bad memory.


#15

I was just a little kid when my parents took me on a tour. The statue of the boot has been a life long memory.


#16

Good thing Arnold wasn’t tried for his treason. He didn’t have a leg to stand on.


#17

Treason doth never prosper…

Still have my copy from 1964. I rarely dispose of a book.


#18

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.