I wish the Greek Orthodox would reunite with us

I love Greek Orthodox people in general and their kindness and devotion, plus the beauty of their… liturgies? I wish they would come to our church and us go to theirs and be one big happy family again.
Mormons and Jehovah’s Witnesses I love too. Good people. Lutherans, I don’t know much about but what example I’ve seen is excellent and very conservative. The rest of them, no comment lest I sin.
Just a note to open arms to the few groups who are devout though we disagree on doctrine.

I am an orthodox from lebanon (middle east), in middle east we only have 2 types of christianity, catholic and orthodox, we dont have protestants and the 38 000 type of churches. we have jehova’s witnesses but we don’t consider them christians.
But Orthodox and catholic in middle east go to each other’s churches without even thinking.
I think it’s cause the persecution in there we just want to pray. I am an orthodox but i only been to orthodox church 1 time when i got baptised, never again. Here in america i am going to catholic church every sunday.

Sadly, it may require persecution to bring everybody together again.

While I would hope that never happens, if it did, then as in our Revolution, it would be understood that we must “hang together or be hanged separately.”

ICXC NIKA.

Why would we? We don’t believe the same things.

I was in Lebanon a couple years ago. Really is a beautiful country. I do remember there being a few protestant churches in Beirut. I attended a large Reformed Baptist church one Sunday evening.while over there which was an interesting experience. All the women wore head coverings which was a bit unusual.

Such as?

I have the greatest faith that the true churches of East and Western Christianity will find the maturity to unite as we must against a growing threat. We must accept each others wonderful history and rich liturgies. There are seemingly unpassable barriers however nothing stnds in the way of the will of the Holy Spirit.

What is truly sad is that many of the Orthodox for some strange reason believes we have different unrelated beliefs. If you go back to the first 7-800 years there were variations on a theme which were totally acceptable in the early Church whether east or west.

In fact the only real difference we possess is about some hierarchical structure related to the Bishop of Rome and even that is way overplayed, all be it that the Orthodox under believe what the Pope has and the majority of Catholics over believe. Everything else is acceptable and should never be a reason for separation.

If you listen to some of the Orthodox posters you would swear that their current beliefs are what the ancient Church held to, down to the nth degree, when in fact the options of beliefs they have now are in many respects different in many nuanced ways, yet the very same freedoms they allow themselves in nuance they do not allow others.

The reality is that we will eventually be as one and there will be a rejoinder, once clarification is made over the hierarchical Church structure and though it may seem a long time away, I have no doubt that within 25 years we will be together.

Amen.

Just a thought experiment, if I may: Imagine if you will that a Oneness Pentecostal and a Catholic were talking, and the Oneness Pentecostal said “I don’t know why you think that you and I have different beliefs. We both believe in Jesus.” Would you say “You’re right”? No, right? Because while you share some very basic/fundamental belief with them (e.g., there is one God), there are other basic beliefs (e.g., the divinity of Christ, traditional Triadology, etc.) that you guys do not share, in addition to many more less basic beliefs that you do not share. I believe that a Oneness Pentecostal and a Catholic are farther apart in doctrine than a Catholic and an Orthodox Christian, if we look at things only in a checklist manner (i.e., there would be more basics in common between Catholics and Orthodox, precisely because they both share some form of Trinitarian belief and believe in Christ’s divinity that the Oneness Pentecostal does not), but in that same way there are many less basic beliefs that are held by Catholics that are not held by Orthodox, even outside of the obvious differences in ecclesiology: the Filioque, the Sacred Heart and related devotions, the Immaculate Conception, Purgatory, etc. These are not matters of ecclesiology or jurisdictional principles, but they are all beliefs that the Orthodox do not embrace. I take it that’s what you mean by “different unrelated beliefs”.

Everything else is acceptable and should never be a reason for separation.

The problem is that the Orthodox do not agree with this idea. Everything else is not acceptable to them, though it may be acceptable to you.

If you listen to some of the Orthodox posters you would swear that their current beliefs are what the ancient Church held to, down to the nth degree, when in fact the options of beliefs they have now are in many respects different in many nuanced ways, yet the very same freedoms they allow themselves in nuance they do not allow others.

There is a difference between nuance within a recognized framework agreed upon within the church in question (read: internal consistency, whether or not anyone outside of the church would agree with what is taught there), and what those outside of the church would call nuance. To both communions under discussion in this thread (which I am not a part of, but I don’t doubt that you’d both agree with this point), of course their own explanations and views are nuanced and correct – though the “other side’s” are not. I don’t think it would take too much digging to find Orthodox posters challenging RCs on the Filioque (to use but one example), nor to find RC posters challenging EO posters on that communion’s limited allowance of divorce and remarriage (ditto). Both churches’ explanations of either matter are nuanced, but to those outside of each respective communion, that is not enough to make them right.

I have no doubt that within 25 years we will be together.

This is highly, highly optimistic by any stretch of the imagination, though I wish you both luck just the same.

The EO Church is the closest possible to the Catholic Church, but still there are alot of differences. We all hope for unity, but till all these issues are resolved it will not happen.

I’ve said it before, but the big thing that must happen before there is unity is we must agree on what “unity” is.

Orthodox do not want what most Catholics seem to call unity, and most Catholics do not want what Orthodox call unity. Any discussion before that is agreed on won’t go anywhere.

If you enjoy the liturgy but wish to attend a church in communion with Rome, you might try out some of the local Eastern Catholic Churches. We somehow manage to live with an Orthodox Liturgy and worldview and share communion with the Western Church.

Unfortunately but true, but sometimes people react when a tragedy occurs.

I have no doubt that within 25 years we will be together.

Get ready for some serious roughness then, because only worldwide mass persecution would bring it about in 25 years.

ICXC NIKA

what is the Orthodox understanding of unity?

Thank you so much for sharing your booklet, much appreciated.

Exactly what our constituent churches have with each other.

Communion can be looked at as a number of independent churches who all believe the same thing. No hierarch has any power over any church outside his own hierarchy.

True … Although I think I’m a lot closer to accepting that than to accepting Anglican or Lutheran ideas of unity. :cool:

To the OP: Thank you for your sentiments. I and many other Orthodox (we’re not all of the Greek variety but it’s a common mistake) ardently wish for reunion also. A lot of what separates us is just history. But what we need from Catholics is a willingness to reexamine some of the developments that took place in your church following the schism.

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