Idaho School Teachers Dress as Mexican Stereotypes, Border Wall


#164

That would punish their students too, which is unacceptable.


#165

Depends on how they treat children.


#166

Their culture was most certainly being ridiculed with fake mustaches, sombreros, and serapes. That it occurred at a faculty party and got shared on social media doesn’t make it any more acceptable.

It might help some people to be at the receiving end of cultural mockery. I’ve traveled a fair amount and experienced insulting but highly ignorant stereotypes of the U.S. and Americans. Humbling doesn’t begin to describe it.

It will inevitably come from a lot of people, all over the world, including here. But school teachers in a professional setting should know better than to mock the culture of many of their own students.


#167

He was not a foreordained thing. When he started there were about 10 Republican candidates, sorry but people had many real alternative options and yet the voted for him in the Primaries. His behavior, personal life, name calling, racial comments, and pettiness would have disqualified him not an election before. No there are a good many people that wanted this.


#168

Only partly true.
The other candidates started dropping out during that primary season (states all have different primary election dates). So the people towards the end didn’t actually have other options.


#169

And to be fair, the people who voted for other candidates before the dropping out can’t be blamed for their preferred candidate dropping out.

But by all means have fun promoting the false narrative of mean and phobic Trump voters :smirk:


#170

You do understand this was a team building activity to portray stereotypes and to talk about the effects of stereotyping, it wasn’t a team building activity to stereotype. There is a big difference and as someone from a very progressive state, this happens all the time in progressive states (NY/MA) in schools and colleges, these type of team building activities are not uncommon. Not sure where you come from?


#171

Fine the school district if you have such a problem with it. The teachers were simply just participating in a team building activity that they were given. Also, you do understand that the activity was to portray stereotypes and to talk about the negative effects of stereotyping, it’s wasn’t an activity to stereotype or done with the intention to stereotype - there’s a big difference. These type of team building activities are not uncommon.


#172

It’s pretty easy to see. This was a team building activity to portray stereotypes and to talk about the negative effects of stereotypes, it wasn’t done intentionally or as a joke to stereotype, or because the teachers were insensitive or “racist” or pro-wall.

How did you expect all involved to approach a team building activity where they had to represent a country and portray a stereotype of people from that Country? Do you have a better idea?

The school obviously thought it was OK, since they came up with the team building activity. Again, these type of team building activities are common among teachers who through these activities build sensitivity to how kids may react to other kids. I don’t think anyone expected someone posting a simple picture would generate so MUCH false information, and media attention.

Again, they weren’t intentionally stereotyping, they were asked to portray a stereotype that people have of other people from different countries and talk about the negative effects of stereotyping. You may want to learn the facts before judging.


#173

I voted for Ted Cruz initially, held my nose when I voted for Trump but I’m very happy with the results of his administration. I don’t think he’s a role model, or an example of how people should behave or live, but his policies have been fantastic. I’ve never had a better year for my business than this current year. I was able to give all my employees raises and lower the cost of their healthcare, which never happened before.


#174

Link, please?


#175

If this is the case, that changes almost everything (except perhaps the wisdom of such an activity). Is that what the administration said was the purpose of the exercise?


#176

And that’s the problem. Most team building exercises don’t involve deliberately stereotyping people.

First, where are you getting that that was the intent?

Second, if that was the intent, that makes it worse. It’s one thing to stereotype from ignorance. It’s another to know that what you’re doing is wrong and still do it.

Yes, pick a better team building activity or a better topic. At my workplace, we did superheroes.

Who at the school did?

You just said that it was a team building exercise designed to stereotype.

Apparently not. If anything, the backstory, which by now isn’t even consistent, is only making things worse.


#177

It wasn’t deliberate - that’s were you are mistaken. The teachers didn’t just do this because they “felt” like it. The activity was not to deliberately stereotype people but to pick a country and then to portray stereotypes that currently do exists for people of those countries.

It was posted on Facebook from a teacher that was part of the activity. I totally disagree. It doesn’t make it worse because the the intent was to talk about the negative effects of stereotyping and to learn about sensitivity to how kids may feel from stereotyping. It makes the activity much more important.

You don’t think talking about stereotypes for people from foreign countries and how it may affect those children in a school environment isn’t important? I think most school head associations would disagree here.

That’s not what I said. Go back and read what I said and try to comprehend it a bit better.

What’s not consistent from your point of view. It’s not worse at all.


#178

What a terribly misguided idea for a costume contest. Depicting “Stereotypes” begs for inappropriate depictions- how could it not.

I don’t get the idea at all.


#179

I actually didn’t know that, none of the news stories I saw reported that. Typical! Well, I change my view then. They did what they were told to do and it’s almost like they were set up.


#180

They did a good job, too. I am a conservative and was disgusted, at least at the caricaturing of Latinos part of it.


#181

They weren’t quite quick enough to realize that the best course would have been to dress up as a caricature of themselves, or a caricature of how people from other nations might see them or even how people from other states stereotype people from Idaho. It would let them express what it is about the depiction that they’d feel was unfair or uncharitable.

If this was an exercise among teachers and administrators meant to be an in-house activity that needed explanation, the real failure in judgment was making this failure in judgment so public or in giving publicity that was sure to be spread without the explanation for the images.


#182

Where I come from, we have activities that demonstrate the harmful effects of stereotyping. They do not involve dressing up in demeaning outfits and taking pictures for social media.


#183

I can easily tell you how I would handle it. I would have said, “This is demeaning and I don’t want to participate in it. I think there are much more effective ways to learn about the effects of stereotyping without actually participating in it. We don’t teach our students the desired behavior by having them practice the undesired behavior.”


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