Ideas for ‘reverse flotillas’ gain steam

Student Union chairman Boaz Torporovsky, who has been leading the reverse flotilla charge, told The Jerusalem Post on Monday, “Hundreds of people have volunteered for the flotilla, and many more are contacting us all the time for ways they can help.
“Our plan is to deliver much-needed humanitarian assistance to the Kurds of Turkey, who by the way outnumber Israelis and Palestinians combined,” he said…

Another sea-bound venture is being organized in an effort to draw attention to Turkey’s own controversial policies – this time to Cyprus, to “call for an end to the Turkish occupation” of the island’s northern half – and is being organized by Meretz activist Pinchas Har-Zahav, and his son Haim, who has also signed on for the voyage…

Har-Zahav added that the ship’s passengers were not looking for a violent confrontation and if told to turn back, they would.

“But we feel that it’s important for us to show and remind the world that Turkey is not a righteous country, but a near-rogue state, and that we, the Israeli people, are not suckers.”
jpost.com/Israel/Article.aspx?id=177789

Wow!

While I do consider them very talented relative to the region they're in, the Turks can be a dangerous, even a vicious people. One almost wishes them to take over the Middle East again. Then the likes of Hamas would find out what oppression truly looks like.

These people involved in the reverse flotilla surely must be aware that they're not dealing with Israelis at the end of the treks. They are extraordinarily brave.

Sailing a flotilla to *Kurdistan *could prove tricky.

[quote="Ridgerunner, post:2, topic:201226"]
Wow!

While I do consider them very talented relative to the region they're in, the Turks can be a dangerous, even a vicious people. One almost wishes them to take over the Middle East again. Then the likes of Hamas would find out what oppression truly looks like.

These people involved in the reverse flotilla surely must be aware that they're not dealing with Israelis at the end of the treks. They are extraordinarily brave.

[/quote]

They would have the Kurds of Iraq to back them up.:)

Turks have much to fear from a liberated Iraq and a semi-independent Kurdish region in Iraq. They were not happy at all about that prospect during the Second Gulf War. Freeing the Kurds exposed the underbelly of Turkey in a way that they just did not want.

Police states as a rule can be very effective at destroying the like of Hamas and the various brotherhoods. It is not that the Islamist hate the despotic regimes ruling Syria and Egypt and places like that any less than they hate the Jews. But as Kadeveri points out, states like Turkey, with strong military and police presences, have no problem with killing 35,000 'freedom fighters'. As a general rule, the Muslim street does not even react against this kind of thing either, even if it were a hundred thousand freedom fighters being choked by mustard gas. As long as the power is being wielded by Muslim against Muslim, it is better to chase with the hounds than run with the foxes after all. Power becomes its own justification according to the dominant worldview.

Likewise Saddam Hussein had no problem with terrorists either. Raping and torturing the wives of the suspect in front of him, and snipping off the fingers of the freedom fighters' babies and children and exposing his ears to their screams, does have a very chilling effect on the willingness of even the most devout Islamist to engage.

Not to say that Israelis are not tough on their own captures, but there are just some things that Israelis cannot do, even if they were morally capable of doing such things as a nation—which they are not!!

. The option of blowing up the house of the suicide terrorist's family is about as far as they could go in that direction, and even then the world howls.

But yeah, there are ways of dealing with terrorists very effectively, if a regime is so inclined.

Of course there can be blow-back for Israeli activists supporting 'freedom fighters' too. Today's freedom fighters have a way of turning into tomorrow Hamas' and Talibans and El Qadas.

Such are the idiosyncrasies of dealing with a culture where human rights are a political ploy rather than a value and a deeply held conviction.

[quote="Kadaveri, post:3, topic:201226"]
Sailing a flotilla to *Kurdistan *could prove tricky.

[/quote]

Yep, sort of like sailing from San Francisco to Salt Lake City. You just can't get there by ship.

If the students were actually serious, they would be organizing a truck caravan.

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