If I believed in a heresy when I was baptized is my baptism valid


#1

If I believed in a heresy when I was baptized is my baptism valid :shrug: like reincarnation or different weird stuff like that


#2

Yes.


#3

My danger is becoming Stoic, which I find myself attracted to.


#4

Since most of us were Baptized as infants with no knowledge of anything, yet fallen in our Adamic nature, I would be slow to say the Baptism is void. The question is whether Christ is alive in your heart… if you wish then be re-baptized to,make sure…


#5

I had similar concerns at one time. I was told by my pastor that I had nothing to do with my baptism being valid. Three things are needed for baptism to occur: there is water, the priest intends to do what the Church intends, and the priest says, “I baptize you in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit.” Don’t be like me, my friend, and fall into scrupulosity. What matters is that you NOW understand those beliefs are false. If you continued to hold these beliefs after baptism and it bothers you, go ahead and confess it, but don’t let the devil steal your peace of mind. I think your parish priest will also allay your fears about your baptism.


#6

NO! This is incorrect information. I teach the pre-baptism classes at my parish and I am very much aware of what the Church teaches in this matter. We are baptized only once in our lives (and I confess one baptism for the forgiveness of sinsNicene Creed) and that baptism is not contingent on our state of mind. The sacrament when performed with proper matter and form is valid for all who receive it. Baptism removes all sin, original and personal, and so any previous sins would have been remitted through this sacrament. Baptism is regenerative and restores our sanctifying grace that Adam and Eve had before the fall.

If you continue to adhere to heretical thoughts and/or teachings then you can take that up with your confessor in the Sacrament of Reconciliation. But, just to be sure, you do NOT need to be baptized again since a spiritual birth (like a physical birth) happens only once. So, embrace the graces of the sacrament and find your peace in the sacramental life of the Church. God bless you…teachccd


#7

I am assuming the same goes for Confirmaition? I was confirmed immediately after my baptism.


#8

How can that be? Since When I was confirmed I wanted to be re-baptised and they refused saying my baptism ( in the Presbyterian church) was valid. As you know these are the guts that came up with Bread and “Grape juice” is only a symbol. Big heresy.


#9

For a baptism to be valid what is needed is form (correct baptismal formula), matter (water) and intent (intention to be baptized).


#10

When I read all of this regarding things that are unknowable…yet worth arguing about I think of the parable of the wheat and the tares. Paul spoke of one baptism…

It is all about if Christ lives in your heart. If He does not then ten baptisms are meaningless.


#11

I don’t understand your question.

He asked if his baptism is valid. The answer to that question is yes.


#12

Yes. Confirmation is the completion of your baptism and also leaves an indelible character on your soul. So it is received only once.


#13

It must be realized that there are Christians (by baptism) and disciples (those who follow Christ). The sacrament is always efficacious regardless of the persons state of mind. In other words, baptism will still initiate one into the Body of Christ, sanctify one with the gifts of the Holy Spirit, remove original and personal sin, make the person an adopted son or daughter of God and leave an indelible mark on the soul. This all happens because of the Sacrament and not because of one’s disposition. Now, after baptism if one were to reject Christ (and I wouldn’t imagine why one would be baptized if he rejected Christ at the time) and then have a conversion of heart they can avail themselves to the sacrament of reconciliation.

I get your point but there is ALWAYS only one baptism and it is a regeneration of the soul regardless of any outward circumstances. The graces received in baptism will also aid in one’s contrition should they fall from grace (actual grace).


#14

sorry. quoted the wrong person


#15

If i am correct you are saying that being baptized takes the place or may take the
place of being born again…it is like saying that performing the rituals makes you a believer. Wasn’t that one of the main complaints of Christ toward the Pharisees? There must be relationship for there to be regeneration…


#16

In the Gospel of John 3:5 Jesus tells Nicodemus (a Pharisee) that unless one is born again of water and spirit they cannot enter the kingdom of heaven. Jesus also commissions the disciples in Matthew 28:19 to make disciples of all nations baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit. This is not an empty ritual but a command of Christ. So, yes, being baptized is being born again in water and spirit. ALL of the early Church Fathers agreed that this passage (John 3:5) referred to baptism.

The regeneration of the soul in baptism takes place regardless of the disposition of the one being baptized. It can be rejected, however, but the character of the sacrament remains. If we look at the Eucharist, for example, we can see that a person in the state of mortal sin can receive the sacrament. Does the Real Presence increase the sanctifying grace received at baptism in this person’s soul? No, because that person rejected God and is not repentant. However, is Jesus still fully present in the sacrament? Absolutely.

A Sacrament is an encounter with Christ. The Catholic Church (as well as some Protestant denominations) baptize infants. The baby is too young to have established a relationship with Christ so this is an extension of the parent’s faith in the hopes that the child will continue. But, if the child renders his or her own decision for Christ when they reach the age of reason he or she is not baptized again. Paul makes if very clear in Ephesians chapter 4 that there is only one baptism.

Perhaps you should refer to the Catechism of the Catholic Church for the proper and official Church teachings concerning baptism. We do not adhere to empty rituals as some would like to think but rather we follow the commands of Christ. Jesus Christ was baptized Himself not because He needed to be but to give us an example of what it is that we must do. I pray that you research the Sacrament of Baptism so that you can present it to others in the light that the Church teaches. I see that you are Catholic and so it would only be fair to yourself to receive and present the truth regarding Catholic teachings. God bless you…teachccd :slight_smile:


closed #17

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