If i die before confessing


#21

So in other words, you confessed, did your best, but you forgot one. You did not say you forgot one. You said you confessed it. You did not say you forgot. You need to be clear in what you write.

So you forgot it through no fault of your own. The sin is forgiven. If you die after that before your next confession, the sin remains forgiven and you are saved.

IF you remember it, the sin is STILL forgiven, but you need to mention it at your next confession. But you do NOT need to rush to confession as soon as you remember it. Just mention it at your next confession. In the meantime, you are free to receive Communion, and if you die, you are saved.

A valid absolution does not retroactively become invalid. Ever.


#22

I think we’ve gotten too legalistic in our understanding. Confession is God’s way of giving us an objective sign of our forgiveness, as the priest is Christ’s ambassador, so-to-speak. Sometimes, though, Catholics present Confession as the only or even normative way that God forgives us. To say this largely misunderstands Christian history.

Yes, Confession is a sacrament, but it developed over time, and was utilized differently in the earliest centuries. I appreciate the Eastern Christian approach more, which acknowledges Confession as a sacrament, and yet also encourages recourse to God through our own one-on-one prayer with Him. The tendency to become legalistic, I think, is due to our Western obsession with defining things: “Is this a mortal sin?!?!” and so on.


#23

Just so that no one gets the wrong idea, Confession IS the ORDINARY and NORMATIVE way mortal sins are forgiven. An act of Perfect Contrition forgives mortal sin ONLY with the intent to confess at the soonest opportunity.

Lest people think of Confession as merely a good idea. Salvation hinges on it.

I will not allow people to spout out dangerous ideas like this just so as not to sound “legalistic”. Laws are in place for a reason, and then the Church says it is the ORDINARY means of remitting mortal sin, you better pay attention.

Mortal sin is real and it sends people to hell. Don’t ever deceive yourself into thinking otherwise.

If it’s the truth, then there’s nothing “legalistic” about it.


#24

1484 ‘Individual, integral confession and absolution remain the only ordinary way for the faithful to reconcile themselves with God and the Church, unless physical or moral impossibility excuses from this kind of confession.’

Catechism of the Catholic Church

It is the only normative way God forgives mortal sins, at least.


#25

Just so that no one gets the wrong idea, Confession IS the ORDINARY and NORMATIVE way mortal sins are forgiven. An act of Perfect Contrition forgives mortal sin ONLY with the intent to confess at the soonest opportunity.

Lest people think of Confession as merely a good idea. Salvation hinges on it.

I will not allow people to spout out dangerous ideas like this just so as not to sound “legalistic”. Laws are in place for a reason, and then the Church says it is the ORDINARY means of remitting mortal sin, you better pay attention.

I disagree it’s good to frame it like this, though. Because it makes it look like God established Confession to make things harder for us.

I don’t disagree with Catholic teaching on Confession. I’m only saying, considering this thread and how others talk on CAF, that we often approach it in a legalistic manner: “YES YOU WILL GO TO HELL IF YOU DON’T MAKE IT TO CONFESSION.”

So anyway, I maintain what I said. I appreciate a less-legalistic emphasis. God calls us to forgiveness and grace all the time, whether or not we make it to Confession.

You can look at it two ways: the Sacrament of Confession makes forgiveness easier, or the Sacrament of Confession makes receiving God’s forgiveness when not going to confession harder. Both are true in different senses, but the way we approach it will affect how we consider God: is he a legalistic tyrant waiting to condemn us, or is he a merciful Father trying to forgive us in every way possible — even when don’t make it to a specific physical location with a priest?

Anyway, my response was not necessarily a reply to the OP as much as it was to how some people on here are talking about confession.


#26

That’s very good advice, barring a miracle, if one is in mortal sin and doesn’t have perfect contrition with a desire to go. I don’t see why you’re trying to undermine Catholic doctrine so people feel more ‘comfortable.’


#27

It doesn’t tell the whole story.

Many people will not understand the theological nuances, and so the Christian faith becomes one of legalism.

“Let’s see, did I commit 5 acts of _______ or 6 acts of _______. Oh dear, was that a mortal sin? Or was it not? I will go to hell unless I make it to the wooden box called the confessional.”

That’s the wrong approach.

Confession is an abundance of mercy, an objective sign of God’s promise. But to think outside of Confession God wishes to condemn us – merely because we don’t make it the the sacrament – is absurd to me.


#28

Its deeply disturbing to see someone with ‘catholic’ in their username reduce this great sacrament to an irrelevant ‘wooden box.’ Deeply disturbing.


#29

I don’t see how that’s disturbing, considering I’ve been emphatic that I accept Catholic teaching on Confession.

I went to Confession last week.

I find legalism and restricting God’s mercy to be disturbing. That’s all I’m saying.


#30

And your opinion is dangerous because it gives the impression that Confession is not necessary. It IS, and because it is the ORDINARY way of remitting mortal sin, you CANNOT be saved if you have the opportunity and refuse to take it. This is the Catholic teaching, and I don’t care how the discipline was back in the first century. If there is no obstacle to you going to confession, it is NOT optional for the forgiveness of mortal sin. It is not there to make the forgiveness of mortal sin EASIER. It is there to make the forgiveness of mortal sin POSSIBLE. Because of his mercy, he can and will make forgiveness available when Confession is impossible. But he will not excuse you if you refuse it when the Confessional is right there.

This is not about legalism. This is about what God has established BY DIVINE DECREE, that not even the Church has power to change it. He is not doing it because he is a tyrant. He did this because HE KNOWS WE NEED IT. His house, his rules. This is not the Church being difficult. This is because God wants to ASSURE us of his forgiveness.

I am responding because I will not have you endanger souls with your wrong opinions.


#31

And your opinion is dangerous because it gives the impression that Confession is not necessary.

Confession is necessary for someone who is truly sorry for their mortal sins but does not have perfect contrition.

Happy now?

You can call back the inquisition.

And while you’re at it, please go back and read what I’ve said and see if it ACTUALLY contradicts Catholic teaching.


#32

Great, I went two weeks ago. That doesn’t change the fact you’re insinuating that God will normatively forgive mortal sins in other ways than the sacrament of reconciliation, which is not Church teaching.


#33

Oh but He will.

The Eucharist, private prayer, liturgical prayer, acts of charity and love… all of these are opportunities of grace and forgiveness.

Ever hear of perfect contrition?

**This response was initially given when the prior response read: “That doesn’t change the fact you’re insinuating that God will normatively forgive sins.” But now that the author of the post went in and changed it to “MORTAL sins,” then my reply to the post does not apply. Mortal sins cannot be forgiven without perfect contrition or, for those who are aware, intent to go to confession – whether imperfect or perfect contrition.


#34

NO! Confession is necessary even if we have perfect contrition. In fact, mortal sins are only forgiven if we determine to go, even if we exhibit perfect contririon. This is quite rare, by the way.


#35

Sure, take communion as an alternative to confession. What could possibly go wrong…


#36

Absolutely not. Perfect contrition remits mortal sin only with the intent to confess at the soonest possible opportunity. There is no forgiveness of mortal sin without it. And even then, you are not free to receive Communion until absolution is received. Again, Confession is the ORDINARY way of receiving forgiveness for mortal sin. That does not make it optional.

Oh gosh yes, it contradicts big time. INP has given the Catechism citation as to why you are wrong.


#37

NO! Confession is necessary even if we have perfect contrition.

If one knows they need to go to confession.

SEE, it has to do with definitions. Please define necessary.

The person who dies with perfect contrition before physically walking into the confession box IS FORGIVEN.

So is the Protestant who doesn’t know better.

So is King David when he prays:

Have mercy on me, O God, according to thy great mercy. And according to the multitude of thy tender mercies blot out my iniquity. Wash me yet more from my iniquity, and cleanse me from my sin. For I know my iniquity, and my sin is always before me.To thee only have I sinned, and have done evil before thee: that thou mayst be justified in thy words and mayst overcome when thou art judged.

To say otherwise would mean that God established Confession to bind his mercy up and make things harder on us. That is RIDICULOUS.


#38

It forgives sins — venial sins. Please look up the Catechism.

You had previously said Confession was the normal way God forgives us. False. This is true of mortal sins.


#39

This is getting laughable. You are deliberately obfuscating Church teaching to get across your agenda. It has been made clear to you, multiple times, that perfect contrition only remits mortal sin with intent to confess as soon as possible. God established confesion as the only ordinary way to remit sins. You look it up in the Catechism.


#40

Here, you don’t even have to:

1452 When it arises from a love by which God is loved above all else, contrition is called “perfect” (contrition of charity). Such contrition remits venial sins; it also obtains forgiveness of mortal sins if it includes the firm resolution to have recourse to sacramental confession as soon as possible.


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