If you were meeting with the Pope next week, what question(s) would you pose to him?


#1

Since the Pope is coming to America in six days I thought I would ask this question:
If you had a private audience with him, what theological or apologetic questions would you ask him?


#2

First I would probably ask him to sign one of my bibles. Then I’ll go on about how his life is, and such. Asking for “basic” info on the faith too. I’m only 15.


#3

I would have two questions:

  1. Since the “Good News,” the Gospel, can be summed up in three words: “He is Risen” (without these three little words, we would be putting all our faith in a dead rabbi), and since the first person commissioned to speak those words was Mary Magdalen, how is it that a woman is not allowed to preach or even to read the Gospel at Mass?

  2. Why is consecration not a Sacrament? I think of someone like Mother Teresa… how very many years she served God, yet her consecration into religious life was not a Sacrament… all the nuns throughout the ages who have lived decades in the cloister… Why? I base my question on Matthew 19:1-12 which I believe is the scriptural basis for consecration to be a Sacrament.

I would love to hear a Pope’s answer to these two questions.


*“Dear God, do You know the greatest grief one of Your creatures can bear? It is the thought that she can never love You enough…” *- St. Gemma Galgani


#4

I’d ask him if he would be in favor of the Latin Nova Vulgata version of the bible being translated into the English Language.

I’d like to ask him that question in front of all the bishops of the USCCB.


#5

I would ask him for his blessing and request he pray for me when he goes home to the heavenly kingdom.


#6

What are your hours like? :smiley:

How can we American Catholics be better Christians?


#7

probably ask him what’s on his Ipod at the moment.


#8

Nothing.

I have two ears and one mouth and I would be using them in that proportion.

Peace,
DCD


#9

I’d ask him to sit down with my evangelical family for a debate on matters of the faith. :smiley:

I’d probably ask him to pray for my family and for myself.


#10

#11

As I live in NY and am within 30 min of Yankee stadium, if I had the glorious fortune and blessing to meet the Pope, my question would be simple in nature…“Is it wrong to pray to have physical pain eased, or should it be embraced as suffering that God wishes to have experienced?”


#12

Even Jesus pleaded for the Father to prevent His passion and death, yet He also asked for the Father’s will to be done.


#13

I would ask him what he sees as the fundamental theological challenge of our time is and how the Church can rise to it.


#14

I would say to him that I believe all matters of Faith are extremely simple, does something hurt God or Man/woman, if so it is an evil, if not then it is good/neutral.
That being the case, Why no women priests?
A very simple arguement for this…
If women were ordained, there would be more Priests celebrating the Mass (obviously)
The more Masses that are said the greater the spreading of the Word of God to the people and wider availability for the faithful to recieve Communion.
If Masses and the availability of Holy Communion is restricted for any reason, then it is an Evil. Hence, non-ordination of women is an evil.
We are currently restricting Masses…


#15

something along the lines of, why is the music at mass so bad and uninspiring – and what can we the laity do to help improve the situation?


#16

If Jesus had not die on the croos, he would go on spreading the message with great miracles, if God made big signs all the time splitting oceans everybody could convert, if most saints had children, there would be more catholic people, if we made a big advertisment campaign on Tv, more people would come to the faith.
That is not the way of God.He always works small.


#17

He does not always work small, The Universe for one…
But anywho, He charged US to spread the Good News. We should be doing all we can to spread it!

There is a desert of a world out there that is crying out for the living water of Christ.

There is no Good reason NOT to ordain women. St Peter was told that whatever he considers bound on earth will be bound in Heaven…
Likewise, whatever Peter’s successor binds on earth…
If the Pope decides to allow the ordination of women… he has already been given the authority to do so.

No one can argue against what Ive said - restricting Masses and the availabily of the Eucharist is an Evil!!
Even if only one woman ever became a priest, and she only said one Mass… that is a priceless good presented to the world by God!


#18

I’d ask two questions:

  1. Why aren’t every bishop and every priest commanded to pray the rosary in front of an abortion clinic at least once a year? Let them set up a schedule and bring their flocks with them, so there is always a group kneeling and praying at every abortion clinic.

  2. Why are our Catholic schools being closed down? We should be expanding them, establishing schools in the poorest districts, to give the children of the poor a quality education. That would be true social justice.


#19

As a Lutheran, I would thank him for all he has done for Christianity, and for his work thus far for Ecumenism. I would then ask him to continue his work and prayers for unity.

Jon


#20

i don’t think it is commanded that anyone has to say the rosary.

that, my friend, is a great question. why is it that (at least where i have lived… and experienced… i’ll get back to that) most catholic schools are in nicer areas and only people with some money (notice i didn’t say rich because i know MANY who sacrifice so their kids can go there) can go there.

my questions would all be along the lines of how to move towards unity within Christianity and what is possible for the catholic church to do? (meaning, what are some of the things that are merely practice… not doctrine… that could be changed that would help towards unity and why isn’t the church doing those things?) i would also ask what can protestants do as well. that question would take a longer answer because of the differing theologies among protestants.

anyway, my story really quickly. i actually was raised catholic, baptized, received first confession, first communion, and confirmation. my parents have always had little money (due mainly to my father’s alcoholism and lack of responsibility and my mother’s lack of education forcing her to do a job where she doesn’t make much money). i attended a catholic elementary school for 1st and 2nd grade. i loved it. every tuesday father scanlon (one of the parish priests) would come to our classroom and teach about the bible and the faith. he would ask questions from the last week and i swear i was an embodiment of horschack from welcome back kotter. i loved remembering those things and answering the questions and asking ones of my own. father scanlon was extremely kind to me in the classroom and out. apparently, my mother paid for 1st grade but couldn’t pay all of my 2nd grade. the pastor “forgave” the debt of my 2nd grade year but would not allow me to continue to go there because of lack of money. thankfully, the public school was the top public school system in the state and i got a great education. but i withdrew from the church and my faith until it picked up again when i was exposed to some great people who were protestant. not one of them ever said anything against the catholic church. i did attend CCD and that was okay. my mom took us to mass every sunday. but i did not have that fire that i did when i was young. i remember saying to my mom when i was 7 that i wanted to be a priest someday. that desire was gone. i wonder what might be different if the school had been able to let me continue to attend.

but, all that said, i have strong convictions theologically and God renewed my desire to do ministry (which i have done for the past 14 years). i have gotten to study under some great men and women and love our God. i do wish though that i could have stayed at that school… even still today.


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