I'm doing RCIA


#1

I'm rather excited. I'm going to an informal RCIA class tonight. The formal one starts soon but it conflicts with my own church's service and also I'm having a baby at the end of the year. I'll be glad to finally do this and learn more.

My daughter and I went in to their chapel today and gave some money to light a candle at the front. I need to read what the proper protocol is. We knelt for a while and meditated. What a beautiful sanctuary! There were statues. I swear the one of Mary almost looked like it was breathing. I don't know why, but I found those statues comforting. I was raised by Southern Baptists and you just do not do what Catholics do... pray to Mary, have statues... It's all considered idolatry by their standards. I totally get it, though. For me, it's aethetics and it's so beautiful and peaceful. I feel... I don't know... I feel really moved and connected being in there. I felt at home.

Okay. Don't laugh at me! I'm serious though. I just felt so good there. I was burned by Christianity and just going into a church for a long time made me feel physically ill. I feel comfortable going into Catholic/Episcopalian churches. I just felt so warm and loved. It's crazy, I know. I wasn't expecting it and thought I would share.

I do need to read up on proper protocol when going into a chapel to pray and to light those candles!

Thanks for "listening!"

Cara:)


#2

[quote="ScareBear, post:1, topic:250958"]
I'm rather excited. I'm going to an informal RCIA class tonight. The formal one starts soon but it conflicts with my own church's service and also I'm having a baby at the end of the year. I'll be glad to finally do this and learn more.

My daughter and I went in to their chapel today and gave some money to light a candle at the front. I need to read what the proper protocol is. We knelt for a while and meditated. What a beautiful sanctuary! There were statues. I swear the one of Mary almost looked like it was breathing. I don't know why, but I found those statues comforting. I was raised by Southern Baptists and you just do not do what Catholics do... pray to Mary, have statues... It's all considered idolatry by their standards. I totally get it, though. For me, it's aethetics and it's so beautiful and peaceful. I feel... I don't know... I feel really moved and connected being in there. I felt at home.

Okay. Don't laugh at me! I'm serious though. I just felt so good there. I was burned by Christianity and just going into a church for a long time made me feel physically ill. I feel comfortable going into Catholic/Episcopalian churches. I just felt so warm and loved. It's crazy, I know. I wasn't expecting it and thought I would share.

I do need to read up on proper protocol when going into a chapel to pray and to light those candles!

Thanks for "listening!"

Cara:)

[/quote]

Thanks for sharing. God bless you on your journey.


#3

[quote="ScareBear, post:1, topic:250958"]
I'm rather excited. I'm going to an informal RCIA class tonight. The formal one starts soon but it conflicts with my own church's service and also I'm having a baby at the end of the year. I'll be glad to finally do this and learn more.

My daughter and I went in to their chapel today and gave some money to light a candle at the front. I need to read what the proper protocol is. We knelt for a while and meditated. What a beautiful sanctuary! There were statues. I swear the one of Mary almost looked like it was breathing. I don't know why, but I found those statues comforting. I was raised by Southern Baptists and you just do not do what Catholics do... pray to Mary, have statues... It's all considered idolatry by their standards. I totally get it, though. For me, it's aethetics and it's so beautiful and peaceful. I feel... I don't know... I feel really moved and connected being in there. I felt at home.

Okay. Don't laugh at me! I'm serious though. I just felt so good there. I was burned by Christianity and just going into a church for a long time made me feel physically ill. I feel comfortable going into Catholic/Episcopalian churches. I just felt so warm and loved. It's crazy, I know. I wasn't expecting it and thought I would share.

I do need to read up on proper protocol when going into a chapel to pray and to light those candles!

Thanks for "listening!"

Cara:)

[/quote]

We could be twins.. I too was so burned by the christianity. I am so glad God called me to the Catholic Church. When I walked back in after decades.. it was 'Holy' to me. I never felt that way anywhere else.

Congratulations and God bless you!


#4

Welcome Home! There is no real protocol on lighting candles, what you and your daughter did was just fine; some people light candles and then pray to Mary or one of the saints for a particular favor. I hope you can work out your schedule and continue attending RCIA, it will be more than worth it!


#5

[quote="ScareBear, post:1, topic:250958"]
I'm rather excited. I'm going to an informal RCIA class tonight. The formal one starts soon but it conflicts with my own church's service and also I'm having a baby at the end of the year. I'll be glad to finally do this and learn more.

[/quote]

So make it happen!

I'm not a cradle catholic and I never went through RCIA (this baffles some people, actually). My parents were divorced, and my mom, who had primary custody, at the time would have refused to take me to RCIA. She didn't really like the Catholic Church and as a result I was "too young to choose to be catholic".

So Dad talked to a priest. I studied on my own. I read quite a bit from books that the parish loaned to me. At the end of it, I sat down with the priest and we talked about the faith of the Church. The priest verified that my faith conformed to the truth that the church teaches and certified that I was ready to be confirmed (and have my other "first" sacraments as well).

The RCIA program generally IS great, but it's certainly not an OBSTACLE to becoming catholic. Talk to your local priest about what you can do to study and (hopefully) join the Body of the Church if you feel so called!

I swear the one of Mary almost looked like it was breathing. I don't know why, but I found those statues comforting (side note: I like what Pat Madrid says about statues being like having pictures of loved ones or people we admire around... we are and should be comforted by them!). I was raised by Southern Baptists and you just do not do what Catholics do... pray to Mary, have statues... It's all considered idolatry by their standards. I totally get it, though. For me, it's aethetics and it's so beautiful and peaceful. I feel... I don't know... I feel really moved and connected being in there. I felt at home.

Okay. Don't laugh at me! I'm serious though. I just felt so good there. I was burned by Christianity and just going into a church for a long time made me feel physically ill. I feel comfortable going into Catholic/Episcopalian churches. I just felt so warm and loved. It's crazy, I know. I wasn't expecting it and thought I would share.

I'm not laughing at you! I'm celebrating that another child has come home! Maranatha Alleluah! :extrahappy:

Welcome home!

I do need to read up on proper protocol when going into a chapel to pray and to light those candles!

Walk up, put in the suggested donation (or whatever donation you can afford/are called to give). Light candle. Pray!

Generally one would pray for the intercession of whatever saint they lit a candle in front of, though this is by no means REQUIRED.

Thanks for "listening!"

Cara:)

Thanks for sharing and may God bless you abundantly! Pax et Caritas Christi tecum!


#6

[quote="Stjudeprayforus, post:3, topic:250958"]
I too was so burned by the christianity. I am so glad God called me to the Catholic Church. When I walked back in after decades.. it was 'Holy' to me. I never felt that way anywhere else.

Congratulations and God bless you!

[/quote]

Strange thought: do you think you would have ever offered Catholicism a fair chance if some personal evil had not been rendered against you?

If so, I'd say that's a great example of God taking evil and using it for the greater good! Thank God for the crosses we bear which bring us closer to Him (and even though I'm a little late in your case, welcome home!)


#7

Don't worry about lighting those candles! There is no preparation needed.

There should be a holy water font (container) at the entrance to the chapel. Dip your fingers in the holy water and then make the Sign of the Cross, touching first your forehead, your mid-torso (just above your belly button), left shoulder, right shoulder, as you say "in the name of the Father (forehead), and of the Son (mid-torso), and of the Holy (left) Spirit (right), Amen." This little ceremony traces a cross on your person and recalls and renews your Baptism. It is sometimes referred to as "blessing yourself."

The white wax of the candle represents Christ's body, the wick His soul, and the flame His divinity. You may light the candle and offer it for any intention -- to express your love of God, in petition for your own health and well being, for your daughter, in thanksgiving, for any person, place, or thing -- your prayer endures as long as the candle burns, even if you have to leave before then.

Some people like to join the thumb, index and middle fingers as they make the Sign of the Cross. This stands for the Trinity -- Father, Son, and Spirit. The two remaining fingers folded inward touching the palm of your hand signify the hypostatic union, the two natures of Chirst, His humanity and divinity.

Bring a small bottle (an empty water bottle works) and take some holy water home with you. A supply will be near the entrance to the Church or chapel. Bless yourself when you awake and when you retire and any other time you feel the need.

These are God's little kisses, sweet reminders. Catholicism is running over with beautiful, holy reminders.

I LOVE THIS CHURCH!

Jim Dandy


#8

[quote="Jim_Dandy, post:7, topic:250958"]
Some people like to join the thumb, index and middle fingers as they make the Sign of the Cross. This stands for the Trinity -- Father, Son, and Spirit. The two remaining fingers folded inward touching the palm of your hand signify the hypostatic union, the two natures of Chirst, His humanity and divinity.

[/quote]

Another traditional way of doing the sign of the cross: I make a cross with my thumb and index finger, the three others tucked symbolizing the trinity and the cross symbolizing the price paid for the grace in Baptism given to us. Then immediately after making the sign of the cross, I kiss the cross (made with my fingers) and bring it to my heart.

I can't say for sure where or how old this practice is, but there are several (very ancient) parishoners in my home town who used to make the sign of the cross this way...


#9

What a beautiful story to hear. Thank you so much for sharing your experience with us. I too went throught RCI and was received into the church this past Easter, that was the most beautiful mass I ever attended with my daughter which forever changed my life. What you experienced gave me goose bumps. All I can say is Welcome Home....


#10

Thank all of you!!!! I had a great time last night. :D

Cara:grouphug:


#11

Blessings!!!!!! My wife will be starting within the next Month...:):):)


#12

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