"I'm just a dirty Proddy.."


#1

NB for those hot familiar with the term, this is an Irishism, term of abuse, meaning Protestant) This was said to me by a fine young woman as she checked my purchases at the supermarket. I wear a large crucifix etc and this was in Southern Ireland . She was in her 20s. And I was utterly shocked that this kind of thing was still happening in our schools. A while later when I moved to the west coast island, the kind man who helped so much with the house suddenly declared, “I am only a Prod” . A while later, an old man sat close to me on the wee ferry and started telling me to leave the island! Where to go and how to get there! I did not retaliate…Told hm that God brought me here … then he said. " Well, there are a few Anglicans around" and realisation dawned, I simply turned to him and said, " I am Catholic but there are many fine Anglicans and I count many as my dear friends. "
I am seldom online now and reading one of the many sad threads challenging one faith against another brought this to mind.
It reminded me also of the day I was talkng with an elderly couple in the ruins of one of the monastic houses I love. It emerged they are one RC one Church of Ireland. The lady said, " we are so few now and if we do not work together, we will lose everything.“
That is my thought now too. And always it has been my way to say.,” If you believe in the Lord Jesus Christ and strive to live His ways, you are my brother/ sister in Christ Someone else said to me this week that they are not ones for religion;go to mass sometimes, but believe in helping people. etc.
Oddly I have come to a tiny Irish island with a very rare history of intermarriage and happy co existence. The online census for 1911 lists religion and in some families, wife is RC, husband Church of Ireland, children some one, some the other. And they ad their neighbours thrived. What has done more damage in recent years has been the rebuttal by a new priest of the resolution adn agreement reached by the bishops not too long ago … I by the way cannot attend mass etc as my immune system is down and I am now a dedicated Solitary. vowed to this life. We need to make peace. (NB rarely online now so will not see replies, but please, peace)


#2

Adding to this as cannot access the edit. The two Bishops came here and led a joint service and 8 sanctioning that; we have a lovely church C of Ireland and it thrived .New priest, new bishops and mass is now here in the former school.

No one is happy with it and we are so few here now on this island,

I was in Raphoe when there was the huge effort to reconcile neighbours. They did not try ti impose any common faith but to get community relations working.


#3

The girl in fhe first example sounds like she is being tongue in cheek. What island is this we are talking about in any case. I doubt any but the most ignorant would really care if someone else was Anglican or Catholic. What also is this agreement that was reached, you don’t tell us what it was in your initial post.


#4

No she was not; She was hurting. Interesting response from you as always though. The interdenom hostility is alive and thriving sadly and I will have no part in it but will love all in Jesus.


#5

I would need to understand the context of her remark and whether there was previous interaction between your where she told you something about herself that led to her revealing this sort of detail about herself. Raphoe is near the border in Donegal and I suppose some of the hostility there spilled over.


#6

I don’t like to see people not getting along. If something haywire happened 500 years ago, the people today aren’t responsible for that. Most of them are just following the tradition they were born and raised into. I’m pretty sure my husband stays Presbyterian not because he has this huge attachment to the religion but because he has a huge attachment to his parents and especially his grandmother who he was close to as a child, who were all Presbyterians and his grandma very devout.

I took my father-in-law’s KJV Bible to the holy hour service last night and read some of it during Adoration and prayed for the deceased people listed on the Family page that go back 3 generations. The priest doing the Friday night Mass based his whole homily on a story a Protestant preacher told him, he knows the preacher through prison ministry. We’re not all that far apart I don’t think.


#7

Depending on the person or denomination, no, we aren’t. But sometimes being just a little bit off makes all the difference in the world.


#8

Or rather people make it make a difference by placing a huge stress on it. Certainly with regards to Ireland for say say a Muslim, Hindu or someone outside the Christian tradition we’d all just be Christians and trying to explain the whole Protestant vs. Catholic mess to a guy from Pakistan once threw that into sharp relief as he found it very hard to wrap his head around it. It also illustrated how silly some of it is as well when you tried looking at it through his eyes for a moment. .


#9

I would guess this is how it happened: There was no previous interaction. The cashier noticed that Rosebud77 was wearing a large crucifix, figured that she is Catholic, and it stirred up old prejudices. Perhaps her remark meant “You Catholics think I’m just a dirty Proddy.”


#10

Can’t really see a cashier saying that in the context of a customer buying items unless the cashier wants to get herself in deep trouble. If a cashier made that remark to me I’d respond that I was just there to buy shopping and also they should be aware other Christians besides Catholics wear crucifixes at times. I’d got that far and leave politely. I might also point out that this is not what I think of Protestants but that given she was at work and I was just shopping it would probably not be a great moment for an in depth conversation on the matter. With some individuals I’d probably just ask for my change and politely say thank you, leave and not use that store again. Coming out with comments on people’s religion like that in such an environment would be pretty odd, even with regular customers.


#11

In many communities, such behaviour would not be acceptable.

Rosebud77 explains:


#12

I don’t understand why they called you a “proddy”. You said you are a Catholic. Because of the crucifix?


#13

Rosebud does not need to explain my own country to me. Interdenominational hostility does exist in Ireland, but it varies very much in tone and how much it occurs and the forms it takes from place to place. Remarks about people thinking you are a dirty Proddy because you look down on them from a Catholic viewpoint would be considered odd indeed in most places in Ireland and would not be acceptable interaction in a customer service role. She hasn’t told us where this was taking place or provided any back story to it. If the young ladly did say this I’d want to know why? A host of reasons suggest themselves as to why she might have said it, but we are provided with very little information regarding the exchange. It would be unacceptable language to use to a customer in any case and would be grounds to lodge a serious complaint.


#14

I apologize for misunderstanding you.

Yes.

and Rosebud77 seems ready to forgive the wrong and bear it patiently.


#15

I have no idea about this really but maybe it was just anti-Catholicism in the sense that traditionally Catholics and Protestants had such a tribal divide. Anger at the crucifix as an intolerant symbol of ugly old times. Basically she was saying, ‘lay off’ ‘don’t stir the pot’ ‘that is all behind us’. Meaning she was probably more of an atheist secular type, Church of Ireland background. (even exCatholic??) But I defer to those on the thread who know more about the social, political atmosphere. My point is that Ireland is pretty anti Catholic these days - not from a “proddy” perspective, either.


#16

Older women wear crucifixes all the time in Ireland and lots of women from other cultures who have moved there do. Seeing a customer with visible crucifix would be quite common. I’d commend someone for bearing such an insult but do think if a cashier was behaving like that someone would eventually take it up as matter to complain about. The crucifix is also used by Anglicans at times in their Churches as well you should note. :


#17

Maybe in Irelend…not for America.

The Cashier wanted to either relate or defend herself so she wouldn’t be attacked. My friend wears a Franciscan Tao. The Trader Joe’s hippy thought it was a Tao as related to Confusious and was like “Woah you’re so cool for wearing a Tao” then went into some speal.

She corrected him that it was a Franciscan Tao and he refused to speak because “Catholics are so backwards”


#18

That would be considered a serious breach of manners and grounds for a disciplinary process to start here in the UK or in Ireland if you said that to a customer. Mentioning a customer’s faith like that would be considered a serious breach of good taste in most places. The guy going on about Catholics been backward you mention could possibly do with finding the word irony in the dictionary I suspect.


#19

Agreed, anti-Catholicism, anti-Christianity, is at an all time high in the US. It is down to one on one combat. I am still shocked by it. I pay quite a price for declaring myself a Christian in the public square from time to time. Still a vast majority of people are totally cool. But there are militants.

It is equally opportunity too: doesn’t matter if you are a Baptist, Catholic, Orthodox, Lutheran, etc. And on the list goes.


#20

Good to know. Seems like perhaps the OP’s interaction has far more to the story than we’ve heard. It’d be a slightly unusual but feisable example in the US


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