Immoderate laughter is sinful


#1

according to the Catechism. Has anyone confessed this sin? Did Jesus laugh?


#2

:rotfl: This is wrong.


#3

my next confession:

10 Swear words, 2 Belly laughs, a few lies, the usual and

er farting


#4

see, I keep telling you guys the humor police are patrolling these forums but you won’t believe me. may we see the citation please in CCC


#5

[quote=puzzleannie]see, I keep telling you guys the humor police are patrolling these forums but you won’t believe me. may we see the citation please in CCC
[/quote]

It a passage from St. Thomas Aquinas’ Summa Theologica, that’s quoted in CCC 1856.


#6

For the record, the citation is:

**"****1856 **Mortal sin, by attacking the vital principle within us - that is, charity - necessitates a new initiative of God’s mercy and a conversion of heart which is normally accomplished within the setting of the sacrament of reconciliation:

When the will sets itself upon something that is of its nature incompatible with the charity that orients man toward his ultimate end, then the sin is mortal by its very object . . . whether it contradicts the love of God, such as blasphemy or perjury, or the love of neighbor, such as homicide or adultery. . . . But when the sinner’s will is set upon something that of its nature involves a disorder, but is not opposed to the love of God and neighbor, such as thoughtless chatter or immoderate laughter and the like, such sins are venial." (Emphasis added)The important thing to remember is that the reference is to immoderate laughter. Even things which are good, if indulged immoderately, are problematic.
Hope that helps.


#7

If anyone wants to read the relevant section of *Summa Theologica in it’s entirety, it can be found at:

newadvent.org/summa/208802.htm*


#8

Can you give an example of immoderate laughter?


#9

[quote=Mary1973]Can you give an example of immoderate laughter?
[/quote]

during the third debate…candidates were making light-hearted remarks about their families… the person asking the questions laughed


#10

[quote=MrS]during the third debate…candidates were making light-hearted remarks about their families… the person asking the questions laughed
[/quote]

Did I miss something…again!:confused: I love to laugh…:rolleyes:
Do I need to confess this?:wink:
Annunciata:D


#11

[quote=Annunciata]Did I miss something…again!:confused: I love to laugh…:rolleyes:
Do I need to confess this?:wink:
Annunciata:D
[/quote]

Is your laughter left, right, or moderate?http://forums.catholic.com/images/icons/icon10.gif

Mr S

(the man asking the questions was the “moderator”)


#12

[quote=Annunciata]Did I miss something…again!:confused: I love to laugh…:rolleyes:
Do I need to confess this?:wink:
Annunciata:D
[/quote]

Might the distinction be between “laughing at someone” v. “laughing with someone?”


#13

[quote=MrS]Is your laughter left, right, or moderate?http://forums.catholic.com/images/icons/icon10.gif

(the man asking the questions was the “moderator”)
[/quote]

:rotfl: dah!


#14

im·mod·er·ate (http://cache.lexico.com/dictionary/graphics/AHD4/GIF/ibreve.gif-mhttp://cache.lexico.com/dictionary/graphics/AHD4/GIF/obreve.gifdhttp://cache.lexico.com/dictionary/graphics/AHD4/GIF/prime.gifhttp://cache.lexico.com/dictionary/graphics/AHD4/GIF/schwa.gifr-http://cache.lexico.com/dictionary/graphics/AHD4/GIF/ibreve.gift)
adj. Exceeding normal or appropriate bounds; extreme: immoderate spending; immoderate laughter. See Synonyms at excessive.

I think the sinful context is laughing at someone else’s expense,or mocking. Seems reasonable to me.


#15

If you look up “laugh” in Scripture, nearly all the instances are of people laughing in disbelief of God (like Sarah) or laughing at someone in scorn.

The Benedictine Rule lists 12 degrees of humility, of which the 10th and 11th are:

The tenth grade of humility is that he [the monk] be not ready, and easily inclined, to laugh… . . The eleventh grade of humility is that a monk, when he speaks, speak slowly and without laughter, humbly with gravity, using few and reasonable words;

I will never make it. I love to laugh!


#16

I’ll let youse all in on a little secret. For centuries monks have been getting around St. Benedict’s injunction by raising poker-faced understatement and the gentle art of damning with faint praise to a style of humor all its own. Said in the right tone of voice and with a properly pious & unctious moue, a seemingly harmless observation like, “He’s one of the Brethren” immediately and without further elaboration translates to "He’s a venal, despicable, opportunistic, apple-polishing toady."As my Trappist novice master was so fond of saying, “Keep the Rule (wink) and the Rule will keep you.”


#17

So now laughing is considered “evil”? What’s next?

Just when I think I’ve heard it all…


#18

Actually I’m told that if you laugh long and hard enough you can actually suffocate and die…

Would that qualify as “immoderate?”

But seriously-- we can all agree that some laughter is immoderate, even if social rules about it have changed a bit since Thomas’s time. Should we laugh in church? At a funeral? Just before your opponent makes his tee shot?

I would guess that for St. Thomas, laughter was “immoderate” in a lot more cases than it is for us. But if I understand rightly, to be a Christian is to believe that anything done immoderately is, by definition, a sin.


#19

How does this square with the verse in Proverbs (again, I don’t have time to look it up) that says, Ä merry heart doeth good like a medicine."?

DaveBj


#20

im·mod·er·ate
adj. Exceeding normal or appropriate bounds; extreme: immoderate spending; immoderate laughter. See Synonyms at excessive.
[Middle English, from Latin immoder[img]http://cache.lexico.com/dictionary/graphics/AHD4/GIF/amacr.giftus : in-, not; see **in-**1 + moderhttp://cache.lexico.com/dictionary/graphics/AHD4/GIF/amacr.giftus, past participle of moderhttp://cache.lexico.com/dictionary/graphics/AHD4/GIF/amacr.gifrhttp://cache.lexico.com/dictionary/graphics/AHD4/GIF/imacr.gif, to moderate; see med- in Indo-European Roots.] im·modhttp://cache.lexico.com/dictionary/graphics/AHD4/GIF/prime.gifer·ate·ly adv.
im·modhttp://cache.lexico.com/dictionary/graphics/AHD4/GIF/prime.gifer·ate·ness or im·modhttp://cache.lexico.com/dictionary/graphics/AHD4/GIF/lprime.gifer·ahttp://cache.lexico.com/dictionary/graphics/AHD4/GIF/prime.giftion n.

Source: The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition
Copyright © 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

immoderate

\Immod"erate, a. [L. immoderatus; pref. im- not + moderatus moderate. See [url=“http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=moderate”]Moderate.] Not moderate; exceeding just or usual and suitable bounds; excessive; extravagant; unreasonable; as, immoderate demands; immoderate grief; immoderate laughter.

So every scope by the immoderate use Turns to restraint. --Shak.

Syn: Excessive; exorbitant; unreasonable; extravagant; intemperate; inordinate.

Source: Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, © 1996, 1998 MICRA, Inc.

immoderate

adj : not within reasonable limits; “immoderate laughter”; “immoderate spending” [ant: [url=“http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=moderate”]moderate]

Source: WordNet ® 2.0, © 2003 Princeton University
Source: The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition
Copyright © 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

I got this from www.dictionary.com

As we can see, immoderate, defined, has to do with excessivity. (Is that a word or did I make it up?).

Have you all ever seen the movie “Cape Fear”? I mean the fairly recent remake. Remember where that guy…the bad guy…can’t remember his name…was in the movie theatre? He was laughing loudly disturbing the other movie goers. In general he was obnoxious.

So just substitute “obnoxious” for “immoderate” and you’ll have it!


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