In God We Don't Trust: Action needed

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Atheists sue to stop ‘In God We Trust’ engraving in nation’s capitol

Anti-Christian bigotry, like that which took prayer out of schools, is behind an effort to remove National Motto and Pledge of Allegiance

July 15, 2009

According to the Associated Press, the nation’s largest group of atheists and agnostics filed a lawsuit seeking to block an architect from engraving our national motto “In God We Trust,” and the Pledge of Allegiance at the Capitol Visitor Center (CVC) in Washington.

Freedom From Religion Foundation’s (FFRF) lawsuit claims the taxpayer-funded engravings would be an unconstitutional endorsement of religion.

The House and Senate passed identical resolutions this month directing the Architect of the Capitol to engrave “In God We Trust” and the Pledge in prominent places at the entrance, where 3 million tourists visit the CVC each year.

“In God We Trust” has been the national motto since 1956 and has appeared on U.S. currency since 1957. This is another attempt by the radical left to ban God from the public square. The foundation is also challenging the constitutionality of the National Day of Prayer.

Take Action!
Sign our Petition to Congress expressing your support for the engravings and encourage them to stand fast against anti-Christian bigotry. Don’t let the atheists and agnostics censor our nation’s rich Judeo-Christian heritage.

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While I would prefer to see the engravings go forward I do not feel strongly enough about this to sign a petition. The other side does have a valid argument as well.

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