In what order did each church appear?


#1

Ok, I know the Catholic Church is first but…does anyone have a reference or direction to lead me in on this. I am unsure of where the Baptists, Presbyterians, E Free, etc, fall in as far as a time line is concerned… Anyone have any input to add?

Thanks in advance!


#2

Another poster recently gave this resource.

whostartedyourchurch.com/

It should answer your questions.


#3

[quote=MariaG]Another poster recently gave this resource.

whostartedyourchurch.com/

It should answer your questions.
[/quote]

Two bad points on this website:

  1. Makes assumption that Catholic Church was established by Christ. A disclaimer is needed since Non-Catholics do not perceive it that way.

  2. Some Protestant denominational information is too generalized.


#4

[quote=CatherineofA]Two bad points on this website:

  1. Makes assumption that Catholic Church was established by Christ. A disclaimer is needed since Non-Catholics do not perceive it that way.
    [/quote]

Then who did found it? And we can see Christ obviously didn’t found all those other ones. Do those other churches dispute who their founder is?


#5

[quote=CatherineofA]Two bad points on this website:

  1. Makes assumption that Catholic Church was established by Christ. A disclaimer is needed since Non-Catholics do not perceive it that way.

  2. Some Protestant denominational information is too generalized.
    [/quote]

I agree that the Protestant information is somewhat generalized, but how do you list all of them? No disclaimer is ever needed for the truth, regardless of the viewer’s perception.


#6

[quote=Genesis315]Then who did found it? And we can see Christ obviously didn’t found all those other ones. Do those other churches dispute who their founder is?
[/quote]

I think you missed the point of my statement. To present the facts on founders without a bias, a disclaimer would have to be posted that differing views are held about the founding of the Catholic Church. The same would hold true for a Protestant website that made claims without a disclaimer about differing views. If the Catholic Church had an undisputed claim to the roots of Christianity, Protestant seminaries would not be presenting an alternate historical view. They do, because I have heard seminary graduates say so. The next chance I get, I will be asking them about the details. The history aspect to Christianity is becoming very interesting to me.


#7

[quote=geezerbob]I agree that the Protestant information is somewhat generalized, but how do you list all of them? No disclaimer is ever needed for the truth, regardless of the viewer’s perception.
[/quote]

That is the truth as you see it. However, it may not necessarily be the historical view held by historians at large or even other Christian faiths. That is what I am looking into now with personal study. As far as the Protestant information, information can be presented as it relates to the roots of denominations while stating that the descendants of the founders may or may not share some same viewpoints. It might also be mentioned that the differing viewpoints are not a difference so much in doctrine but on non Biblical matters such as hierarchy, church functions, etc.


#8

[quote=CatherineofA]That is the truth as you see it. However, it may not necessarily be the historical view held by historians at large or even other Christian faiths. That is what I am looking into now with personal study. As far as the Protestant information, information can be presented as it relates to the roots of denominations while stating that the descendants of the founders may or may not share some same viewpoints. It might also be mentioned that the differing viewpoints are not a difference so much in doctrine but on non Biblical matters such as hierarchy, church functions, etc.
[/quote]

I must disagree…differences are absolutely about doctrine, core doctrines.


#9

[quote=Catholic Tom]I must disagree…differences are absolutely about doctrine, core doctrines.
[/quote]

I am not talking about doctrine. I am talking about the generally accepted point of view about early Christianity in the historian community. Not just Catholic historians or the Catholic Church’s view of its history. I am talking about documented evidence and how that evidence or lack of evidence is viewed by the community of historians at large.


#10

well since Christ appointed Peter his head apostle to lead his flock and Peter died in Rome, then appointed Linus, also in the Bible, to be his successor, and so forth, the apostolic succession from Peter can be seen only in the Catholic Church. No protestant church can claim this apostolic authority. No Protestant Church can say their original leaders were present at Pentacost with Christ. How do we know Christ appointed his apostles, led by Peter, to be his Holy Catholic Church, because there was no Bible to distribute. Had Christ not wanted the heirarchical structure of the Church authority to be there he would have explicitely stated so, but he said otherwise on many different occasions. No other historical founding date is given for the Catholic Church except for that given during Pentacost.


#11

[quote=CatherineofA]I think you missed the point of my statement. To present the facts on founders without a bias, a disclaimer would have to be posted that differing views are held about the founding of the Catholic Church. The same would hold true for a Protestant website that made claims without a disclaimer about differing views. If the Catholic Church had an undisputed claim to the roots of Christianity, Protestant seminaries would not be presenting an alternate historical view. They do, because I have heard seminary graduates say so. The next chance I get, I will be asking them about the details. The history aspect to Christianity is becoming very interesting to me.
[/quote]

And just how would you dispute it…no other form of Christianity has been around since 33 ad…

Protestants have only been around for 500 years…


#12

[quote=TheGarg]And just how would you dispute it…no other form of Christianity has been around since 33 ad…

[/quote]

We must remember that there are some Churches which are a little older than Rome… for example, there is the Church of Jerusalem where Saint James the Brother of the Lord was the first Bishop, and there is the Church of Antioch where Saint Peter was the founder of its See and where he lived before he travelled to Rome. These Churches still exist today, standing in a great stream of tradition flowing from the time of the holy Apostles.


#13

Yes, but I think one must also remember that if St. Peter had stayed in Antioch, we would have been the Antioch Catholic Church instead of the Roman Catholic Church. It’s not about where the Catholic Church was founded but by when and whom.


#14

Jesus did not establish his church when he spoke to Peter. In Matthew 16:18, he said “I will build my church.” That event was to come.

Jesus explains in John 16:7 “But I tell you the truth: It is for your good that I am going away. Unless I go away, the Counselor will not come to you; but if I go, I will send him to you.”

At the end of Luke, we see Jesus preparing his disciples: 24:29 "I am going to send you what my Father has promised; but stay in the city until you have been clothed with power from on high.”

The promise is fulfilled, and the church is established, in Acts 2:

1When the day of Pentecost came, they were all together in one place. 2Suddenly a sound like the blowing of a violent wind came from heaven and filled the whole house where they were sitting. 3They saw what seemed to be tongues of fire that separated and came to rest on each of them. 4All of them were filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in other tongues as the Spirit enabled them.

This still would have been 29 AD (Jesus was 33 years old, but actually was born in 4 BC).


#15

#16

Jesus did not establish his church when he spoke to Peter. In Matthew 16:18, he said “I will build my church.” That event was to come.

Jesus explains in John 16:7 “But I tell you the truth: It is for your good that I am going away. Unless I go away, the Counselor will not come to you; but if I go, I will send him to you.”

At the end of Luke, we see Jesus preparing his disciples: 24:29 "I am going to send you what my Father has promised; but stay in the city until you have been clothed with power from on high.”

The promise is fulfilled, and the church is established, in Acts 2:

1When the day of Pentecost came, they were all together in one place. 2Suddenly a sound like the blowing of a violent wind came from heaven and filled the whole house where they were sitting. 3They saw what seemed to be tongues of fire that separated and came to rest on each of them. 4All of them were filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in other tongues as the Spirit enabled them.

This still would have been 29 AD (Jesus was 33 years old, but actually was born in 4 BC).

An He did build It on Peter as He promised. And so It still stands to this day as Christ said It would. The gates of hell have not prevailed against It. It is the One and only Church established by Christ Himself, The Holy Roman Catholic Church.


#17

Try this site:

scborromeo.org/truth/figure1.pdf


#18

[quote=SL20]Try this site:

scborromeo.org/truth/figure1.pdf
[/quote]

Excellent post! :thumbsup: I’m going to have to bookmark/get a copy of that one. It’s nice to be able to use a one-page diagram to show the schisms and heresies.

SG257


#19

[quote=BOANERGES21]Ok, I know the Catholic Church is first but…does anyone have a reference or direction to lead me in on this. I am unsure of where the Baptists, Presbyterians, E Free, etc, fall in as far as a time line is concerned… Anyone have any input to add?

Thanks in advance!
[/quote]

Do you have any idea when your faith was founded and by whom? You may find this enlightening:

If you are a member of the Jewish faith, your religion was founded by about 4,000 years ago.

If you are Roman Catholic, Jesus Christ founded your Church in the year A.D. 30.

If you are Eastern Orthodox, your sect separated from Roman Catholicism around the year 1054.

If you are Lutheran, your religion was founded by Martin Luther, an ex-monk in the Catholic Church, in 1517.

If you belong to the Church of England (Anglican), your religion was founded by King Henry VIII in the year 1534 because the pope would not grant him a divorce with the right to remarry.

If you are a Presbyterian, your religion was founded when John Knox brought the teachings of John Calvin to Scotland in the Year 1560.

If you are Unitarian, your group developed in Europe in the 1500s.

If you are a Congregationalist, your religion branched off Puritanism in the early 1600s in England.

If you are a Baptist, you owe the tenets of your religion to John Smyth, who launched it in Amsterdam in 1607.

If you are a Methodist, your religion was founded by John and Charles Wesley in England in 1744.

If you are an Episcopalian, your religion came from England to the American colonies. It formed a separate religion founded by Samuel Seabury in 1789.

If you are a Mormon (Latter-day Saints), Joseph Smith started your church in Palmyra, N.Y. in 1830.

If you worship with the Salvation Army, your sect began with William Booth in London in 1865.

If you are a Christian Scientist, you look to 1879 as the year your religion was founded by Mary Baker Eddy.

If you are a Jehovah’s Witness, your religion was founded by Charles Taze Russell in Pennsylvania in the 1870s.

If you are Pentecostal, your religion was started in the United States in 1901.


#20

[quote=CatherineofA] To present the facts on founders without a bias, a disclaimer would have to be posted that differing views are held about the founding of the Catholic Church.
[/quote]

Not really, the TRUTH is inherently unbiased.

God Bless.


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