Info on Diocesan Life and priesthood

 So, recently, after a childhood of fleeing Christ’s call due to anxiety and sprititual immaturity, I have, after a lenghty and long driven life of prayer, decided long ago to answer His call and become a servant of His Mercy at the Altar. I am drawn to the priesthood like a moth to the flame, though this flame does not ruin me, it in fact, burns me with ardour. I want nothing more in my life than to hear confessions, offer His Sacrifice at the Altar and serve others in a ministry until my death. I would like, if possible, other seminarians and experienced and new priests to offer me advice as I obtain a bachelors degree in Theology and hopefully, become accepted at my local seminary when my time comes to apply. 
 What must I need to know about this life I do desire? What would be expected of me to my (Christ willing, by his will) future parishioners? 
 On a side note, I find myself drawn to the old ways of clerical dress, being a young man, it is not typically found of my generation to wear the cassock or desire to represent the Office of Christ as it once was. Would I, a normal parish priest, be able to wear a roman cassock, fascia, Pellegrina, and birreta? (Outside the Divine Liturgy, I know. Nothing but the alb, cinture, stole and chasuble may be worn when celebrating the mysteries.) Always thought the shoulder cape was so cool. Made me think priests were superheroes when I was a baby. 
 Any advice or prayers, thoughts would be wonderfully appreciated.

~Pax Christi

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easier to read

So, recently, after a childhood of fleeing Christ’s call due to anxiety and sprititual immaturity, I have, after a lenghty and long driven life of prayer, decided long ago to answer His call and become a servant of His Mercy at the Altar. I am drawn to the priesthood like a moth to the flame, though this flame does not ruin me, it in fact, burns me with ardour. I want nothing more in my life than to hear confessions, offer His Sacrifice at the Altar and serve others in a ministry until my death. I would like, if possible, other seminarians and experienced and new priests to offer me advice as I obtain a bachelors degree in Theology and hopefully, become accepted at my local seminary when my time comes to apply.
What must I need to know about this life I do desire? What would be expected of me to my (Christ willing, by his will) future parishioners?
On a side note, I find myself drawn to the old ways of clerical dress, being a young man, it is not typically found of my generation to wear the cassock or desire to represent the Office of Christ as it once was. Would I, a normal parish priest, be able to wear a roman cassock, fascia, Pellegrina, and birreta? (Outside the Divine Liturgy, I know. Nothing but the alb, cinture, stole and chasuble may be worn when celebrating the mysteries.) Always thought the shoulder cape was so cool. Made me think priests were superheroes when I was a baby.
Any advice or prayers, thoughts would be wonderfully appreciated.

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Contact the Vocations Director at your Diocese or at the Order you are interested in.

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Read “To Save a Thousand Souls” by Fr. Brett Brannen.

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I know a young priest who loves his cassock, however, he is very prudent on when he wears it. Diocesan functions find him in a clerical suit. At a monastery or at home, however, he is in the cassock. I think this is probably what most diocesan priests who do wear a cassock from time to time do, and I know several younger diocesan priests that behave similarly.

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Cassocks are a very good evangelization!

image

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I don’t recall ever reading a more eloquent description of discerning a vocation. That was beautiful. I’m not a priest or a seminarian, though I did discern a vocation at one point in my college years (ultimately didn’t go to seminary).

I would mildly caution you that the priesthood is about far, far more than what you wear as a priest. I know you know that, just put it in proper perspective.

Your best bet might be to contact the Priestly Fraternity of St Peter:

https://www.fssp.org/en/

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I just copied and pasted this for the OP @Cuddles57

Its much easier to read then in that little box.

I pray for his vocation. It is a beautiful testimony

If God is calling you as a Priest and you answer His call willingly and lovingly with a heart ready to give selfless service for life there is no greater thing in this world. To be the Spiritual Shepherd and Father to all you meet is a tremendous blessing and much will be required of you. May our Lord grant you every Grace needed to do His will. Yes read “To Save A Thousand Souls” and talk to the vocations Director at your Diocese.

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Thank you for your advice. I will take it to heart and pray further as I continue in my academic years.
~Pax Christi

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Parishioners want to have a Priest:
who is there to serve God, His Church and His people with heart, mind and soul 24-7 / 365. It’s not a job, it’s a calling, a vocation, a giving of one’s self without looking for anything in return. It’s being a Spiritual Shepherd, Father, teacher and living example in the footsteps of Jesus.

Parishioners want a Priest who will not sugar coat anything but preach & teach the truth but even more so live it.

They want a Priest who prays.

They want a Priest who doesn’t talk down to them (because they are very much more educated than most of us) but one who helps them understand the Faith in ways they can get and grasp.

Parishioners want a Priest who admits he’s a sinner like all of us and that he must work on his Spirituality constantly as we must do.

Parishioners want a Priest who emphasizes frequent Confession (no matter what the sin), weekly (and weekday if possible) Mass and receiving Holy Communion. Also that he is frequently available for Confession.

A Priest who encourages, provides and does Holy Hours of Adoration.

A Priest who encourages families (especially those with little “noisy” children) to come to Mass together and doesn’t make those parents feel like their child is a disturbance or a negative by being at Mass.

A Priest who even though he is very busy does home visits, nursing home and hospital visits on a regular frequent basis(weekly if possible).

A Priest who doesn’t expect the Sacristans, Readers, Ushers, Altar servers, etc. to read his mind. That when he is assigned somewhere right away he has separate meetings with each of these groups and explains what he expects and why and even gives printed hand outs with the steps/explanations so there is no confusion.

A Priest that makes all parishioners feel welcome and treats all parishioners the same.

A Priest who shows JOY, happiness, thankfulness in being a Priest and encourages Priestly and Religious vocations of other young men and women.

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You hit the nail on the head, CajunJoy65. All of this is what I desire to do. Even the mere thought of half of these things fills me with a happiness I have never felt.

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Please let us know when you begin in the Seminary. I have a special Holy Spirit inspired call to pray specifically for Catholic Clergy, Seminarians, Religious Brothers & Sisters DAILY. I would love to add your name to my list of those here that I pray for. God bless you and just remember answering His call to be Catholic Priest means HE must increase you must decrease. Hey good solid counsel from your Diocesan Vocations Director, a good trusted Spiritual Director, Priests. and of course Our Lord in daily , if possible, Adoration.
As a Priest it will be All About Him not you, just like how it is supposed to be in marriage for each of the spouses. Prayers going out for you.

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Thank you for the advice, and I will post again of my journey in my vocation. Hopefully one day, I will offer the Most Holy Sacrifice at the Altar.

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I’ll send you a stipend when you do and have you say one for me and my family

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Why the FSSP?

OP, I recommend you to get a spiritual director, preferably a trusted priest.

Because they are fully in union with, and fully in obedience to, the Holy Father, and they seek to preserve the traditional Latin rites of the Church. It is in such an environment that traditional clerical dress and vestments, such as the OP mentions, are most prevalent, and they have an ardor for the salvation of souls and the reverent celebration of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass.

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Already have. My parish priest has been a family friend for my entire life. The director at my local seminary is advising me as well.

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Well, yes. I don’t think a cassock or a cape are good factors for discerning an order though.

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I am aware, fully aware that the clothes are the least important in discernment. Just always thought it was beautiful on a priest and it symbolized the faith.

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