Innocent after 20 years on death row


#1

Great idea to help a cause right here on this board! Please read on!

Think for a minute about everything that you did from 1977-1997. Now,
erase it all. ThatÕs 20 years gone Ð BOOM Ð just like that. IÕm only
21, so that would be a LIFETIME.

I saw a play that really moved me called ÒThe ExoneratedÓ. In short,
the play tells the TRUE stories of people who spent years on death row
before being found innocent and set free.

The play ran for years, but unfortunately, isnÕt running anymore. But I
just saw Court TV is doing a film-version of the same play with some
bigtime actors/actresses i.e. Danny Glover, Susan Sarandon, etc… It
airs on Jan.27th @ 9PM, but IÕd check their site to be sure if itÕs the
same in your time zone or whatever. www.courttv.com

IÕm hoping that I could collect more peopleÕs opinions here so I can
print and mail them to my Congressman and even my Governor. Letters
from actually people are powerful! HereÕs a link to another
documentary, which gave me the idea of how to get involved!
deadlinethemovie.com/get_involved/take_action.php

So if you have thoughts on the death penalty, please share them here.
Just imagine if it was you, or your friend, or family sitting innocent
on death row. FYI One of my favorite songs has the line, ÒIf youÕre not
going to make something better, than youÕre just IN THE WAY!Ó LetÕs
all make something better right now.

Thanks so much!
Sylvia


#2

I favor the death penalty, for a limited list of crimes, and only where guilt is proven beyond any doubt at all, not just “beyond reasonable doubt.”

DaveBj


#3

[quote=DaveBj]I favor the death penalty, for a limited list of crimes, and only where guilt is proven beyond any doubt at all, not just “beyond reasonable doubt.”
[/quote]

Nothing is ever beyond all doubt for us mere mortals (Lord, what fools these mortals be!). “Beyond a reasonable doubt”, or moral certitude, is the best we can do.


#4

I’m against the death penalty. Period. Especially as it is applied here in the US, which, actually, is the only country whose justice system about which I am reasonably informed.
I am against it for anyone. There have been documented cases of people who have come to God and, of course many who have not, while on death row or in prison for long periods of time. On the chance that a person may redeem him/herself, the opportunity must be given. Do we not pray for life “from the moment of conception to the hour of natural death”? We do.
How many people have been executed that were innocent but could not afford the tests and lawyers to prove it? How many guilty people have “walked” because they could afford an expensive lawyer? I don’t know but I DO know that these things have happened. We have the ability to incarcerate for life, if need be. The death penalty, as applied, is revenge and revenge belongs to God. Romans 12:19
For an in depth look at the death penalty and how it is applied, read “Dead Man Walking” by Sister Helen PreJean. I heard her speak on the subject once and any doubts I had about whether or not execution is the answer to society’s problems were laid to rest thereafter for me.


#5

[quote=Benedictus]Nothing is ever beyond all doubt for us mere mortals (Lord, what fools these mortals be!). “Beyond a reasonable doubt”, or moral certitude, is the best we can do.
[/quote]

I beg to differ. In our world many cases are decided on the basis of evidence that is purely circumstantial. These cases can be proven “beyond reasonable doubt,” but that does not mean that they are proven beyond all doubt. Cases like these would not even have been brought to trial under the Torah; two or three eyewitnesses were required, and I would not allow the application of the death penalty in these cases, if I were king.

There are cases where the evidence goes way beyond circumstantial–Hinckley’s shooting of Reagan comes to mind. His guilt was beyond all doubt. Cases like these are the ones where I would apply the death penalty.

DaveBj


#6

[quote=catsrus]The death penalty, as applied, is revenge and revenge belongs to God. Romans 12:19

[/quote]

Me going out and killing someone because he killed my brother–that is revenge. The state’s application of the death penalty is not; actually, the state, in meting out punishments, is acting as God’s minister. Go to the next (13th) chapter of Romans and ask yourself why those government officials Paul was talking about were carrying swords, if not to carry out capital punishment.

While you’re reading the Bible, go back and read the Book of Exodus, starting with the 21st chapter. The same God who says that vengeance is his also commanded capital punishment for a number of civil and religious crimes.

DaveBj


#7

the state, in meting out punishments, is acting as God’s minister.

I’ll let it up to God to deal with His “ministers” of justice.
Until that time, I will not be the switch thrower on another human being for any reason, nor a participant in the process. I will never sit on any jury where the death penalty is on the table.
God’s dealings with the Israelites 4,000 years ago is a discussion for another thread.
Romans carrying swords 2,000 years ago may well have been for execution but what does that have to do with today? By that reasoning, carrying a gun now equates to application of death with whomsoever you may disagree on the law. ??? Did not the Romans disagree with the practices of the Christians?
And just for the record, yes, I too have been a crime victim.
In any case, I’m only stating my own beliefs and opinions on the death penalty in the US. I do urge everyone interested in the subject to read Sister PreJean’s book.


#8

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