Institution narrative liturgy


#1

Hello,
I am very interested in a moment when priest takes the chalice/hostia and raising it a little above the altar.

Is there the official source (like GIRM) for detailed intituion narrative description how much priest have to raise chalice/hostia?

Maybe non official or show me the way, because I have no idea where to search. GIRM is too abstract.

Sorry for my bad english:blush:, I am seminary student from Lithuania.


#2

Ok I am not sure which elevation you mean but here are the rubrics for both the major and minor elevations.
Major
As he comes to the actual words of consecration, the priest bows over the altar, leaning his forearms on it and, looking at the host, he slowly and reverently, in a low voice, pronounces Our Lord’s own words. Thus - acting in the person of Christ - he changes the substance of the host into the Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of our Saviour.

HOC EST ENIM CORPUS MEUM

Immediately after the words Hoc est enim Corpus Meum, he stands erect, then genuflects on his right knee, still holding the Host with both hands over the altar. He stands immediately and, looking at the Host, slowiy raises It straight up before him over the corporal, so It may be adored by the people. This practice was instituted by the Irish Bishops in 1219 at Pope Honorius III’s direction.

Looking all the time at the Host, the priest replaces It reverently on the corporal and genuflects again, his hands on the corporal. The bell is rung three times as the priest genuflects, shows the Body of Christ to the people, and genuflects again.

From this point until the ablution after Communion out of reverence for any fragments of the Body of Christ which might adhere to his fingers the priest holds together the thumb and forefinger of each hand and doesn’t separate them, even to turn the pages of the Missal. He also places his hands on the corporal - rather than outside it - during any genuflection, until his fingers have been purified after Communion.

Rising from the second genuflection, the priest removes the pall from the chalice and lays it on the Epistle side. As always, he steadies the foot of the chalice with his left hand. He may rub his fingers and thumbs over the chalice to allow any fragments of the consecrated Host to fall into the wine.

Standing erect, he takes the chalice by the stem in both hands, and, saying Simili modo postquam cænátum est, he lifts it a little and replaces it on the corporal, still holding it. The priest bows at the words grátias agens and, at the word bene + dixit, he makes the Sign of the Cross over the chalice with his right hand, his finger and thumb still together.

Holding the stem with his right hand and the foot of the chalice with the left, he says tledftque discipufis suis, dicens: Accipite, et bibite ex eo omnes. He bends over the altar, leaning his forearms on it, and lifts the chalice a little, with the free fingers of his left hand under the base.

In the same low, attentive voice, he pronounces the words of consecration of the precious Blood. As he says the words in remissiónem peccatórum, he stands upright.

P. Simili modo postquam cænátum …

Replacing the chalice on the altar, he lays his hands on the corporal and genuflects.

Standing, he takes the chalice in both hands, the stem between the second and third fingers of his right hand, the left supporting the base, and lifts it slowly over the corporal so the people may worship the Blood of Christ.

Putting it back on the corporal, he covers it with the pall and genuflects again.

Minor
Taking the Host with the right thumb and forefinger and the stem of the chalice with the left hand, the priest makes the Sign of the Cross three times with the Host over the bowl of the chalice as he says Per ip + sum, et cum ip + so, et in ip + so, then he makes the Sign of the Cross twice more over the corporal between himself and the chalice as he says Deo Patri + omnipoténti, in unitáte Spiritus + Sancti.

Lifting the chalice slightly, with the right fingers resting on the rim and the Host held upright, the priest says omnis honor, et glória. Until the 13th century, this was the only elevation of the chalice.

P. Per ip + sum, et cum ip + so, et in ip + so, …

The priest puts the chalice back on the corporal, the Host in front of it, rubs the fingers of both hands over the chalice and replaces the pall, before placing his hands on the corporal and genuflecting. With his hands still on the corporal, the priest stands erect and concludes the Canon aloud with the words:


#3

[quote="Churchservant, post:1, topic:300575"]
Hello,
I am very interested in a moment when priest takes the chalice/hostia and raising it a little above the altar.

Is there the official source (like GIRM) for detailed intituion narrative description how much priest have to raise chalice/hostia?

Maybe non official or show me the way, because I have no idea where to search. GIRM is too abstract.

Sorry for my bad english:blush:, I am seminary student from Lithuania.

[/quote]

The detailed instructions are included in the Roman Missal in the rubrics of each Eucharistic Prayer.

I don't have the new Missal at my disposal but in the 1975 Missal, all it said for both the bread and the chalice at consecration was 'raising it a little above the altar'. In other words, they only had to pick it up. After each consecration the rubric said 'he shows the consecrated host/chalice to the people' and at the Doxology it said 'He takes the chalice and the paten with the host and, lifting them up, sings or says:"

Don't know how accurately that translates the Latin rubrics.


#4

Note that, when the priest was facing in the same direction as the people, the elevation necessarily would have to be more pronounced – because the priest had to raise the host and chalice above his head in order for people to be able to see them. When the priest faces the people, the elevation can be much less dramatic in order to allow people to see the consecrated species…


#5

Yes, I understand you. :slight_smile: But where can I find it written - source ?


#6

The present missal says that during each consecration he holds the bread or chalice “slightly raised above the altar,” and then “shows [it] to the people.” This is a good translation of the Latin in both cases (parum elevatum super altare; ostendit populo). Afterwards, the pries takes the chalice and paten and says the doxology “raising both” (utumque elevans).

As to the OP, no, I do not believe there is any more “detailed” description of how high this should be – e.g., 15 centimeters, shoulder height, or something.


#7

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