Intellectual Property Theft


#1

It’s a crime and it is stealing.

ncpc.org/topics/intellectual-property-theft

allianceagainstiptheft.co.uk/importance_of_ip_theft.html

Peace,
Ed


#2

[quote="edwest2, post:1, topic:313443"]
It's a crime and it is stealing.

Peace,
Ed

[/quote]

Tune in same time tomorrow when Captain Obvious tells us:

Rain is Wet

:eek:

and

Ice is cold

:bigyikes:

:D:D:D

Seriously, of course it is.

Unfortunately, many people treat copying and using the work of others with the same seriousness they treat taking a pencil from work :shrug:

Sarah x :)


#3

Rain is wet?

Ed :smiley:

AKA: Captain Obvious ™


#4

When you buy a tune on the Internet and download it, make sure you don’t send a copy to a friend or someone who might sell it to others.

Seriously?

I buy a DVD and I can’t loan it to a friend? All because I don’t need packaging and I live in the 21st century, no one can share anymore?

I guess rain isn’t wet after all.
Scruples for the 21st century.


#5

Amazon marketplace sells used cds for far less than new prices. Artists and publishers do not receive anything in terms of royalties for these sales. Am I stealing if I buy a used cd? Am I stealing if I copy the same cd for a friend or shoot an mp3 in an email?


#6

[quote="Timothysis, post:5, topic:313443"]
Am I stealing if I buy a used cd?

[/quote]

No. The IP holders were paid for that copy.

Am I stealing if I copy the same cd for a friend or shoot an mp3 in an email?

Yes. You made a new copy with out compensating the rightful owners.


#7

[quote="Spider42, post:6, topic:313443"]
You made a new copy with out compensating the rightful owners.

[/quote]

But you're legally allowed to in numerous ways... There's a number of completely inconsistent rules on the matter, creating some very gray areas. Both legally and ethically.


#8

[quote="Spider42, post:6, topic:313443"]
No. The IP holders were paid for that copy.


#9

[quote="Timothysis, post:8, topic:313443"]

So is it "stealing" to loan a book to someone without any compensation?

[/quote]

In some municipalities it is! Sadly, this stuff tends to be that convoluted.


#10

[quote="InigoMontoya, post:9, topic:313443"]
In some municipalities it is! Sadly, this stuff tends to be that convoluted.

[/quote]

To say the least!


#11

Copyright Law is an interesting thing. You are allowed to loan a cd to your friend.

This is taken from Music and Copyright by Marcia Keyser, which was created under a CC By 3.0 License. This is the link of the copyrighted work: cnx.org/content/m41468/1.3/

For a way to obtain information about the CC By 3.0 License, here is link. creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Q: If I purchase a CD, can I loan it to a friend?

A: Yes, the Doctrine of First Sale allows you to do what you want with a copyrighted item so long as you do not use the six rights of the copyright owner. You may even copy it, and edit out the bass line or lyrics, sell it to your neighbor, etc. You should not sell copies, or edited versions. If your friend copies a CD that you loan her, that’s her responsibility, not yours.

[/quote]


#12

If any of you guys are interested about what the six rights of a copyright owner are, here are the rights.

The information within the quote box below was taken from Copyright Basics by Marcia Keyser. This is the link that I got the information within the quote box from: cnx.org/content/m41215/1.6/. This work also used a CC By 3.0 License, and information regarding the CC By 3.0 License can be obtained from this link: creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

III. What are the rights of the copyright owner?
The copyright owner has six basic rights: to make copies, to distribute those copies; to make derivative works; to perform or display the work in public; and

to perform the work by means of a “digital audio transmission.” Any of these rights can be licensed to another person or a company such as a publisher.

Making copies refers to making any type of copy: a photocopy, a photograph, a hand-drawn copy that is indistinguishable or close to it; and computer copies of any sort. These actions count as infringement even if it can be shown that no one has viewed the work.

Distribution is placing the copyrighted work in a way that copies are available to many people. Placing the work on a public Internet site is one form of distribution. Making copies and selling them from a store, or giving them to your friends on a casual basis is another. All of these actions are forms of distribution.

Derivative works are new formats or types of works made from the original item. A novel could be rewritten as a movie; an event from a short story may become a poem or a song. A blog posting could lead to a reader creating a short story. The right to make or prevent derivative works belongs to the copyright owner.

Display or performance in public means that an artwork is made viewable to the public, or that a play, song, or movie is performed in a place the general public can access. (U.S. Copyright Office 1992) Some relatively private areas, such as a college dorm meeting room, at a church outside of services, or a business-dining hall, may seem as though they are not public, but they are. A person not known to the others may walk in at any time. (Note that some campuses define dorms as a “house” where you cannot expect a large number of strangers to congregate. On these campuses, a dorm is not public). (Univ. of Connecticut 2008)

To perform the work by means of a “digital audio transmission” generally means that the music or dramatic work is shared via the Internet or digital radio.


#13

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