Interesting 1975 GIRM


#1

Found the 1975 (second edition of the Roman Missal of Pope Paul VI) General Instruction of the Roman Missal (GIRM) online and found some interesting things.

  1. He then takes the paten or a ciborium and goes to the communicants. If communion is given only under the form of bread, he raises the eucharistic bread slightly and shows it to each one, saying: “The body of Christ.” The communicants reply: “Amen” and, holding the communion plate under their chin, receive the sacrament.

  2. If there is no deacon, other priest, or acolyte:

a. The priest receives the Lord’s body and blood as usual, making sure enough remains in the chalice for the other communicants. He wipes the outside of the chalice with the purificator.

b. The priest then stations himself conveniently for communion and distributes the body of Christ in the usual way to all who are receiving under both kinds. The communicants approach, make the proper reverence, and stand in front of the priest. After receiving the body of Christ, they step back a little.

c. After all have received, the celebrant places the ciborium on the altar and takes the chalice with the purificator.** All those receiving from the chalice come forward again** and stand in front of the priest. He says: “The blood of Christ,” the communicant answers: Amen, and the priest presents the chalice with purificator. The communicants hold the purificator under their mouth with one hand, taking care that none of the precious blood is spilled, drink a little from the chalice, and then return to their place. The priest wipes the outside of the chalice with the purificator.

d. After the communion from the chalice, the priest places it on the altar and if there are others receiving under one kind only, he gives them communion in the usual way, then returns to the altar. He drinks whatever remains in the chalice and carries out the usual purifications.

It also talks about (for Communion under both kinds) intinction, tube, spoon.

ourladyswarriors.org/liturgy/girm1975.htm

The 2011 GIRM states
118. Likewise these should be prepared: …the Communion-plate for the Communion of the faithful…

The above is in Redemptionis Sacramentum too.
[93.] The Communion-plate for the Communion of the faithful should be retained, so as to avoid the danger of the sacred host or some fragment of it falling.

The 2011 GIRM also states
162. In the distribution of Communion the Priest may be assisted by other Priests who happen to be present. If such Priests are not present and there is** a truly large number of communicants,** the Priest may call upon extraordinary ministers to assist him, that is, duly instituted acolytes or even other faithful who have been duly deputed for this purpose. In case of necessity, the Priest may depute suitable faithful for this single occasion.

These ministers should not approach the altar before the Priest has received Communion, and they are always to receive from the hands of the Priest Celebrant the vessel containing the species of the Most Holy Eucharist for distribution to the faithful.

Does your Parish use the communion plate?
How many faithful present for your Parish to use EMHC
Do the EMHC come after the Priest’s Communion, or as I see often, after the Agnus Dei/Lamb of God?


#2

No to the communion plate. But then I never, ever saw what is described - people holding the plate under their own chins. Always an altar server would hold it.

Not sure to the second question - I’ve never counted heads of congregation.

No to the third.

But the 1975 GIRM has surely been revised and updated since then, so you’re certainly using an out-of-date document in any event.


#3

[quote="LilyM, post:2, topic:288509"]
But the 1975 GIRM has surely been revised and updated since then, so you're certainly using an out-of-date document in any event.

[/quote]

Indeed it has been revised, but the communion plate for the faithful is retained in the subsequent GIRMs. Yet I never see it used by anyone, and yet it is mandated.

Interesting that in 1975 there is no mention in the GIRM of EMHC, were there still lots of Priests or Deacons at each Mass back then so there was no need for lay people?


#4

[quote="Canto, post:3, topic:288509"]
... and yet it is mandated.

[/quote]

No, it's merely recommended.


#5

EMHCs were first allowed in 1973, with the promulgation of ***IMMENSAE CARITATIS—On Facilitating Reception Of Communion In Certain Circumstances, ***which, incidently, first called EMHC “Special ministers of the Eucharist” so that term is not one the people have applied to themselves but is what they were called in that first translation of that CDW document.

If you check that 1975 GIRM, which was replaced by the 2002 GIRM, and which over the course of almost 30 years was adapted as new documents were promulgated, #70 says,

Laymen, even if they have not received institution as ministers, may perform all the functions below those reserved to deacons. At the discretion of the rector of the curch, women may be appointed to ministries that are performed outside the sanctuary.

The conference of bishops may permit qualified women to proclaim the readings before the gospel and to announce the intentions of the general intercessions. The conference may also more precisely designate a suitable place for a woman to proclaim the word of God in the liturgical assembly.

The article you quoted was for a Mass without a deacon, other priest or acolyte, and presumably, no qualified EMHC, since laymen by that point could give out Communion - and #244 has a “minister of the chalice”.


#6

[quote="Phemie, post:5, topic:288509"]
EMHCs were first allowed in 1973, with the promulgation of **IMMENSAE CARITATIS—On Facilitating Reception Of Communion In Certain Circumstances, **which, incidently, first called EMHC "Special ministers of the Eucharist" so that term is not one the people have applied to themselves but is what they were called in that first translation of that CDW document.

If you check that 1975 GIRM, which was replaced by the 2002 GIRM, and which over the course of almost 30 years was adapted as new documents were promulgated, #70 says, The article you quoted was for a Mass without a deacon, other priest or acolyte, and presumably, no qualified EMHC, since laymen by that point could give out Communion - and #244 has a "minister of the chalice".

[/quote]

Thank you, Phemie, for pointing that out. Until you did so, I was puzzled by the instruction that those receiving from the chalice had to come forward after everyone else had received the Host.

Hmmm.... I thought. Someone really hasn't tried this out with real people in a real church. What were the chalice-receivers meant to do while they were waiting? Go back to their benches and then climb out over those not going up a second time? Stand to one side and cause a traffic jam?

OP, perhaps you didn't read far enough into the document you quoted?


#7

[quote="Canto, post:1, topic:288509"]

Does your Parish use the communion plate?
How many faithful present for your Parish to use EMHC
Do the EMHC come after the Priest's Communion, or as I see often, after the Agnus Dei/Lamb of God?

[/quote]

Yes

We have a total of 900-1000 on Sundays (SRO for the 10:00; all pews occupied at the 12:00; Guardian Angels fill up some spaces at the evening Mass especially in the summer months).

The EMHC come up after Agnus Dei.


#8

Our parish has always used the paten. The altar servers hold the paten as the communicants receive. Some do a better job than others at using it for its intended purpose.


#9

We have altar boys who hold the patens at our parish.


#10

[quote="paperwight66, post:6, topic:288509"]
Thank you, Phemie, for pointing that out. Until you did so, I was puzzled by the instruction that those receiving from the chalice had to come forward after everyone else had received the Host.

Hmmm.... I thought. Someone really hasn't tried this out with real people in a real church. What were the chalice-receivers meant to do while they were waiting? Go back to their benches and then climb out over those not going up a second time?

[/quote]

Yes. The instructions for Communion under both kinds, at the time a relatively novel practice, was based on the various methods of distribution in the Eastern and Oriental Churches. In a couple of the Oriental Churches, where they do not use intinction, and only priests distribute Communion, Communion takes place with all the communicants coming up to receive under the form of bread, and then coming up a second time to receive from the chalice.


#11

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