Internet...when is enough?


#1

What are some signs that one is addicted to the internet? At what point should one stop or limit there usage of the internet?


#2

When it interferes with your daily tasks. Do you sit in front of the computer putting off things you’re supposed to do?

If you put off cleaning, doing work/homework, cooking, taking the dog for a walk, etc… then, that’s when you’d be addicted.

Oh, and if it interferes with your spending time with people, ie, being on the computer when you should be with with your wife/husband, children, mom/dad…

And spending a ton of time on it… say more than 2 hrs, wose being more than 5 hrs…


#3

when you have over 8000 posts in two years.:blush: (like me):wink: Seriously, I cut way back during Lent, and only spend about an hour total on CAF a night. CAF is really the only message board I visit now. I do read the Bible online, and pay bills…check emails…but those are short moments online…nothing like CAF.

I will confess–I never spent as much time online, before coming here, but it’s really absorbing at times–learning so much about my faith, helping others, making new friends, chatting with old friends…well, you get the point. But even good things can be done to excess!:o

I agree with yessisan. If it becomes to the point where tasks you have to do are not getting done, etc. Since cutting back during Lent, it is now effortless to only be on here no longer than an hour per night. Are you feeling that you spend too much time online, Catholic?


#4

When you IM your wife from the next room to ask her what’s for dinner.:blush:


#5

ha!:smiley: classic, i love it!


#6

http://bestsmileys.com/lol/1.gif


#7

Like any other habit or hobby, it becomes an addiction when you have to do it rather than want to. If you find yourself not on the net and thinking about going on the net. If you turn it on for companionship or to remove yourself from other relationships or responsibilities.

Please forgive me, but since you are asking, maybe you already know the answer?


#8

People can use the Internet as a procrastination tool without being addicted. The problem there is the procrastination, not the Internet. :wink: This problem seems particularly prevalent among college students…

If I started preferring the Internet to interaction with the people in my life, I would have a problem. As it is, I use the Internet to interact with them. I do have to be careful and make sure I get homework done before I get online, as I can lose track of time :wink: This would be remedied by losing the wish to procrastinate and looking at the clock more often, though.


#9

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