Invetro


#1

My wife had her tubes tied 17 years ago. We wanted to continue the family 5 years ago so we went through the invetro system and after 2 times of trying it did not work. Recently we wanted to try again. We have 16 eggs in preservation. Are we still committing a sin by going through with this or do we need to try for a reversal of the tubal issue. I have been praying real hard and can not get good advise from our Preist. Can someone help with this decision.


#2

Yeah it is sin… :frowning:

Go here: ncbcenter.org for lots of resources about this and what you can do. There’s no need to despair! :slight_smile:

and maybe here for some knowledge: catholiceducation.org/articles/medical_ethics/me0041.html


#3

Are these 16 frozen eggs already fertilized?

If not, then you cannot proceed and will need to seek other options.

If so, then all 16 are already living human beings. The sin that created them is in the past. I think you’d now have a responsibility to give each one its best chance of developing into an adult. You will still need to be guided by ethical principles as you proceed. For one thing, I have heard that in-vitro fertilization sometimes involves implanting “extra” embryos to raise the odds that one will “take”. If too many take they “selectively terminate” (a.k.a. abort) the surplus. Clearly you cannot go down that path. I do not know if it means implanting one at a time, or if 2 would be ok.

–Bill


#4

I’m sorry that you haven’t gotten good advice from your priest. Yes, having one’s tubes tied is a sin, but that was in the past—and you might not have been aware that it was a sin, so your culpability may be less—ditto with in-vitro fertilization. I think you can now see why the Church takes the position it does regarding in-vitro fertilization: now you have 16 lives that you have created and are responsible for.

Don’t beat yourself up, but do seek good advice on how best to proceed. I would second Lazerlike’s recommendation of ncbcenter.org — they may be able to give you the help that you need. I have heard of popepaulvi.com also mentioned, though this may be more of a resource for those with fertility problems. But do contact the ncbcenter.

God bless.


#5

[quote=Mot Juste]Are these 16 frozen eggs already fertilized?

If not, then you cannot proceed and will need to seek other options.

If so, then all 16 are already living human beings. The sin that created them is in the past. I think you’d now have a responsibility to give each one its best chance of developing into an adult. You will still need to be guided by ethical principles as you proceed. For one thing, I have heard that in-vitro fertilization sometimes involves implanting “extra” embryos to raise the odds that one will “take”. If too many take they “selectively terminate” (a.k.a. abort) the surplus. Clearly you cannot go down that path. I do not know if it means implanting one at a time, or if 2 would be ok.

–Bill
[/quote]

So you think he should potentially have 16 more kids? Yikes! :eek:


#6

[quote=BluegrassJimmie]So you think he should potentially have 16 more kids? Yikes! :eek:
[/quote]

Embryo adoption is an option.

–Bill


#7

[quote=BluegrassJimmie]So you think he should potentially have 16 more kids? Yikes! :eek:
[/quote]

They already are his kids, in actuality and not just potentially.


#8

Thank you all for your advise. I agree I have a responsiblilty to the fertilized eggs. The questions is do I have my wife have a reversal and put the eggs up for adoption and let God make her pregnant if that is his will or just go ahead and with the transfer next week. I am beating myself up because I was in the Holy Lands last week and this subject came up. The person I was with felt I really needed to get some guidance before I made a decision. we did not understand the situation when we had either proceedure done and we spoke to our priest that told us it was fine to continue with invetro. Im just confused…


#9

billyd,

The website that Lazerlike listed should give you some help, and there’s probably contact information there so you can talk to someone.

I am so sorry that you were given bad advice: what your priest told you is contrary to Church teaching, so no wonder you’re confused. But, you didn’t know the ramifications of what you were doing, and you got crappy advice from someone who should have told you the truth. So, don’t beat yourself up over this: what’s done is done, and you weren’t deliberately trying to do the wrong thing. The important thing is to now move forward in an ethical manner. And you might want to discuss this matter with your priest, and hopefully get him to stop giving out this erroneous and morally reprehensible “advice”. If he doesn’t listen, by all means let your bishop know about the situation.

As for reversing the tubal ligation: you are not absolutely required by the Church to do so, though it can be and often is a meritorious act. This one is up to you. You might feel better about making a decision after you have spoken with someone who is relaible in this area, perhaps at the bioethics center that’s been mentioned, or, at the very least, after talking to a priest who is not dissenting from the Church. Where do you live? Perhaps, if we know your location, someone might be able to suggest a solid priest in your neck of the woods.

By the way, a respected theologian (whose name I’m forgetting right now!) pointed out that the term “fertilized egg” is misleading—once an egg is fertilized, it becomes a developing human life.


#10

Definitely follow the links that others have mentioned. I strongly suggest getting some accredited professional Catholic opinions about your options.

My gut feeling is that if your wife is healthy, and if you act throughout the process with the intention of saving the life of each embryo, then you can (and perhaps should) go ahead with it.

The only reason I can think of to prefer giving all the embryos up for adoption instead of trying to carry one or more yourselves is if you’re concerned that your wife has a medical condition that would make it less likely for her to be able to carry the child. If you have reason to believe that an adoptive mother would have a better chance, then that’s a consideration.

If you do go forward with the transfer, it may be hard to find and follow the ethical path. There are so many unethical practices and your doctor may push them on you. Please get help with this!

Here’s the kind of thing I’m talking about…

They may want to “thaw” several embryos and let them develop for a few days to see which one(s) are thriving. They would only transfer the “good” ones.

Or when they do the transfer, they may want to transfer 4 of them to maximize the chances that one takes. Now if you transfer one and it doesn’t make it, despite your best efforts, that’s not your fault. But if you transfer four and they all make it, what will you do? Are you open to the possibility of quadruplets? Could your wife safely carry that many? The doctor may ask you to “selectively reduce” by killing the extras. He may tell you that none of them will make it if you don’t get rid of some. All of that would be avoided had you only transferred one.

Following the moral path will be more expensive. It may bring you into conflict with your doctors. It may cause more heartache for you if you transfer one at a time, several times, only to miscarry. Get help. Get support. You can make it through this.

I am praying for you.

–Bill


#11

I appreciate your prayers and certainly need them. I live in Indianapolis Indiana for those that may know a good Preist to talk to about this. I am so sorry I have gotten myself in this situation but I know it was for reason. I will try to talk to someone at the center you recommended. You are right in what happens to the thawing process. They thaw the ones they think will survive and inplant usually 3 at a time. My wife is healthy and could certainly withstand a transfer or normal pregnancy and surgery. I am leaning towards going ahead with the tubal reapi and adoption so not to do another unethical thing. I had no idea this was such an ordeal. I think God exposed me to understanding this better over the past few months so I am sure God is watching my decision.


#12

I’m heading out of town, so this will by my last comment for a while. I just want to make sure that I haven’t given you the wrong impression about continuing with the transfer. Even though it may be tricky to find the right path, I actually think proceeding with transfer of one embryo at a time would be the most meritorious act possible in this situation. Yes you could put them all up for adoption, but if you want to do what’s right, I think you ought to raise as many of them as feasible yourselves. I do not know what the chances of an embryo being put up for adoption actually has of being adopted.

God bless,

–Bill


#13

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