Is a Mythological god Tattoo Blasphemous?


#1

Hello,

I’m considering getting a tattoo but wanted opinions on possible immorality or blasphemy. I am 20 years old and not currently religious (agnostic), and am strongly considering getting a tattoo of the mythological Norse god Tyr, who represents law and order, keeping of promises, and selflessness. I want to get this tattoo to remind me of my norse heritage, and also to keep as a reminder to be a strong man with these traits. I still live with my Christian parents who are financially helping me through college so I promised them I would get more clarity on this question before getting the tattoo. To me, Tyr is a mythological cultural symbol that represents positive traits, but i’d be interested in hearing other opinions as to whether a tattoo of another historical god may be considered blasphemy or otherwise immoral in any capacity to the Christian God.

Thanks,

Tom


#2

I see nothing wrong with it. It’s not like you’re worshiping the god or anything, you’re (presumably) getting a tattoo of him because he repesents something meaningful to you. The only thing I see that could probably go wrong is that others might take the tattoo wrong, like maybe they’ll assume you believe in and worship the god or something. But really, you could always explain it. If you didn’t want to explain it, it’s really not any of their business.

It’s just art. I know a guy who carves little statues of Pagan gods that resemble idols out of wood and adds a Chi Rho on their heads to symbolize that Christ overcomes them.

I personally will not get a tattoo of anything unless it is relatively small and represents my Catholic faith, but that’s just my taste.


#3

I don’t think so. A lot of the art work of Catholic masters has been about mythology. I don’t see it as sacrilegious at all.


#4

Do you have a design in mind? Have you shown it to your parents or neutral persons to get their first impression? I like the look of Norse tattoos (I’m half Dane so I look at tattoos with that theme.) What I suggest is making copy of a tattoo and putting it somewhere where you will see it regularly for a year before getting it. Before you get one know that some branches of the military prohibit them on certain parts of the body and different law enforcement agencies have different, ever changing rules about tattoos. Having one may mean going undercover will be more difficult so kiss your career as a seekret agent goodbye. :wink: If you get one, save up and get a good one so even if you loose interest in a Norse god you have a great piece of art. No scratchers, even if they open the needle in front of you.


#5

I have a tattoo of fenrir of norse myth from Final Fantasy and I am very very Catholic. I also have the tattoo of the cross of st James. The fenrir one actually reminds me of the armor of st Michael the archangel at this point as well as the Cherokee wolf. It is a matter of if it is tasteful and what it means to you or cultural or syncretic meaning. I no longer regret any tattoos I have at this point because I know I have a solid relationship with Christ and Mary. Just think about whatever you get because they last forever. And what would Christ say to you when you see him.


#6

Don’t do it. You’ll live with that stuck on you for life. I can’t imagine lacking forethought so much to permanently ink oneself.


#7

image


#8

image

That might cost you some money - for a good one !


#9

That is pretty judgemental.
Tattoos have become a way for people to express themselves. In fact, I, at 48, just got my first.
If you don’t want one fine, but don’t make disparaging remarks about someome else’s choice.


#10

false idol, false god.

Dont do it. Think of some other way to represent what you wish ti.

For Christians, esp Catholics, remember that first Commandment?

Hear oh Israel, The Lord your God is one. You shall have no other God.


#11

Tattoos are just how the young people express themselves nowadays, loosen up.

When I was a young adult in the 1970’s, the only folks that had tattoos were sailors, exotic dancers, bikers and guys that spent time in the can. Very few tattoo joints, I think there was only one in Pittsburgh for many years.

Now its all the rage, young people trying to be individuals, cut them a break


#12

Yes, all pagan gods are blasphemous to God from a Christian point of view as well as a Jewish point of view. The Bible clearly states there is no other God except God and since Jesus is the Son of God someone recognizing the existence of another deity is idolatry from a Christian point of view.
Tattoos are considered defiling one’s body in the Bible and is not accepted by either Christianity or Judaism.
P.S. I don’t know why everyone else is saying otherwise and may they offer some catechism where the church unbinds body defilement through tattoos or Bible quotes on their claims that pagan gods are okay and how do they know that depicting one is not worshiping one.
God bless! Peace!


#13

I wouldn’t do it. Personally I’m against tattoos. Practically I’d recommend against them if for no other reason then they make you more identifiable. In our world being identifiable is a huge liability.

If you must get a tattoo of St. Olaf or Harald Hardrada. But I wouldn’t put an image of a pagan god on my body.


#14

How do you define blasphemy? How does the Church define blasphemy?

Do you plan to worship this tattoo or the God depicted?

Yeah, digging for answers will help you grasp these concepts :slight_smile:


#15

#16

I’d probably get the Tyr rune, (upward pointing arrow) than one of a depiction of the god.

Cleaner lines and more simple design will age about 100000 times better. That’s something kids don’t realize - tattoos fade and the lines blur with time. Intricate tattoos look like blobs a decade down the road.

I’d also consider a Chi-Rho :slight_smile:
Tyr Rune
images
Chi Rho
index


#17

I have five traditional Norse tattoos in the Jellinge and Urnes style. I designed them myself and I love the way they look but they are one of my greatest regrets. I got them when I was a pagan and 90% of the time people assume that I still am because of them. I’ve also been accused of being racist on several occasions because of the various hate groups that use similar imagery.

I’d suggest taking some time before making a final decision. Make sure you really want that image and all the baggage that can come with it.


#18

I got my first tattoo at age 57, back in September. I got a cross on my ankle with a purple rose for my mom, who was a gardener, and for St.Therese “The Little Flower”, and it says Prov. 3:5.

A couple months later I got the words “Have faith in Him” with a cross, then not long after that I had a dark pink/orange rose added above the words.

A little over a week ago I got a dove on my other ankle and below the dove, an Ichthys with a cross inside it.


#19

If I was getting sent to jail, I’d get “LOVE” and “HATE” tattoos on my knuckles- so the other guys don’t think I’m new to the scene.

But other than that- not too likely at all- I can’t see getting a tattoo at age 61.


#20

Who exactly am I judging? I’ve simply stated the reasons I’ve personally never and will never get a tattoo.


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