Is a normal diocesan priest permitted to wear a shoulder cape in the U.S?


#1

I couldn't find this information.


#2

From what I have seen, no.

Anyways, it would be up to your bishop and the major seminary.

Why not ask them.


#3

I’m pretty sure I read somewhere that Anglican convert priests can but that tends to be it in the US.


#4

I do not know why they would not be allowed to do so. Is the wearing of shoulder-capes restricted to bishops?


#5

[quote="Young_Thinker, post:4, topic:221985"]
I do not know why they would not be allowed to do so. Is the wearing of shoulder-capes restricted to bishops?

[/quote]

Yes, with the exception of the UK and Ireland but it's sort of extended to other states under the crown. It had been a long standing Anglican norm so local Roman authorities in those countries let Catholic counterparts where them.


#6

Interesting.


#7

I remember that here at the seminary we had a discussion about this. I recall that it is something allowed for pastors, although this is just what I heard so don't put to much stock in it. I do know of examples of priests who wore it, including the pastor of one of the men here.


#8

thank you, i will inquire with my bishop.


#9

They're not the most comfortable things in the world. That's why many bishops have cassocks without them. The Claretian cassock has a shoulder cape, because they were founded by a bishop who gave them the same cassock. Most of them wear a cassock without it.

Ask any religious who wears a cowl with a long collar, such as some Franciscans, Carmelites and Dominicans. They can get in the way when you bend forward. I take mine off all the time. Our collar reaches down to our elbows. It's a pain when you're trying to put on a coat or picking up something.

Fraternally,

Br. JR, OSF :)


#10

I believe this is correct. The pastor (a diocesan priest) at a parish here (Archdiocese of Chicago) often wears a cassock that has one, and he is 100% orthodox.


#11

The shoulder cape is something that was extended to priests in the UK and Ireland by Pope Pius IX during the restoration. Subsequently it has also been used in Australia and New Zealand, where in the early Catholic Church in both countries were primarily English and Irish clergy.

So in the modern day the shoulder cape would denote that the priest is from the UK, Ireland, Australia or New Zealand. The accents in which they speak should give you a hint as to which they are from. :p

This does not extend to clergy in the US (unless that particular priest is visiting from one of the afore-mentioned countries I would guess).


#12

just my two cents, but I believe the shoulder cape is reserved to bishops and canons.


#13

The shoulder cape or the long capuche on a habit (same thing) are not that important. I don't understand why the question or is it just curiosity?

Fraternally,

Br. JR, OSF :)


#14

It's just curiosity. I saw a priest in a movie wearing one.


#15

Ahhhhhhh, IC

Movies don’t always represent things correctly; but you already know that. :stuck_out_tongue:

There are some congregations of clerks regular that wear a cassock with a shoulder cape. They look exactly like the cassock worn by some bishops, but without the piping. Some congregatons of brothers also wear them. They are not worn that regularly anymore, because they are uncomfortable, especially if you’re trying to put a coat over it or are in very hot weather. I know that the Claretians received it as their “habit” from their founder. But they rarely wear it. If they wear a cassock, they usually wear either the Jesuit cassock or the Roman cassock. The Roman has lots of buttons and the Jesuit cassock is open at the bottom, like Nero’s coat in The Matrix, but with a sash.

I have never seen a diocesan priest in the USA wear one, except for those bishops who are secular priests.

Fraternally,

Br. JR, OSF :slight_smile:


#16

I definitely get the thing about movies. I once watched a how where the priest told a man he could not be absolved of a murder until he turned himself into a priest. And then later the priest turned him in anyway. NOT something any real priest would do, on pain of excommunication.


#17

A priest= Can wear a BLACK CASSOCK, BLACK CINCTURE BAND W/ or W/O FRINGE, and a Shoulder Cape. (I am not sure about the cape knowing Canons wear capes) So maybe take the cape off, I would be super happy just to wear the cassock...


#18

[quote="InChristoRege, post:17, topic:221985"]
A priest= Can wear a BLACK CASSOCK, BLACK CINCTURE BAND W/ or W/O FRINGE, and a Shoulder Cape. (I am not sure about the cape knowing Canons wear capes) So maybe take the cape off, I would be super happy just to wear the cassock...

[/quote]

I think one's bishop might have a say about this. Especially regarding the cincture and cape.
Can. 273 Clerics have a special obligation to show reverence and obedience to the Supreme Pontiff and to their own Ordinary.

Can. 284 Clerics are to wear suitable ecclesiastical dress, in accordance with the norms established by the Episcopal Conference and legitimate local custom.


#19

[quote="ByzCath, post:18, topic:221985"]
I think one's bishop might have a say about this. Especially regarding the cincture and cape.
Can. 273 Clerics have a special obligation to show reverence and obedience to the Supreme Pontiff and to their own Ordinary.

Can. 284 Clerics are to wear suitable ecclesiastical dress, in accordance with the norms established by the Episcopal Conference and legitimate local custom.

[/quote]

Hello, Br. Dave. I believe that our friend meant a black fascia, not a cincture, if that makes any difference.


#20

[quote="Young_Thinker, post:19, topic:221985"]
Hello, Br. Dave. I believe that our friend meant a black fascia, not a cincture, if that makes any difference.

[/quote]

Ok, but it still would be bound by local custom and what the Episcopal Conference has said.


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