is attending a Sunday/Saturday MASS mandatory?

I was under the impression that attending Sunday MASS was mandatory; however, a friend of mine from work believes differently (he says he only goes sometimes himself), and now I can’t find it in the Catechism… it does say that it’s encouraged, and important, but not mandatory?..

love
Saoirse

Here we are - in the ‘Ten Commandments’ section under ‘third commandment’ (honour the Sabbath Day) - My emphasis

" The Sunday obligation

2180 The precept of the Church specifies the law of the Lord more precisely: ***“On Sundays and other holy days of obligation the faithful are bound to participate in the Mass.”***[117] “The precept of participating in the Mass is satisfied by assistance at a Mass which is celebrated anywhere in a Catholic rite either on the holy day or on the evening of the preceding day.”[118]

thank you, LilyM :slight_smile:

but,
does this mean that not attending MASS is a sin, or just that people should attend MASS, but they don’t have to?

love,
Saoirse

it says "BOUND’ and it means bound, that is, under pain of mortal sin, we are bound to assist at Mass on Sunday’s and Holy Days of obligation. Bound here means what it says in Christ’s directions to the apostles on Easter Sunday evening: whatever you bind on earth is bound in heaven, whatever you loose on earth is loosed in heaven. binding and loosing in the context of biblical laws means literally being tied to the observance of those laws. Christ is giving the apostles the authority to forgive sin, and the authority to determine how God’s laws will be interpreted and implemented on earth, including his laws regarding worship due him, liturgy, sabbath etc.

It is a mortal sin to miss mass without a serious reason-- such as being too ill or caring for an ill child, etc. There are some specific instances in which one is not sinning by missing mass but they are limited to serious situations.

Yes, we are required by the Commandments and by Church law to attend Mass either or Sunday or Saturday vigil.

Just because the majority of Catholics do not attend regular Sunday mass, does not mean that it no longer carries a serious, mortal sin status.

Mortal sin is Mortal sin, is mortal sin.

No matter how the secular media colors it. The ten commandments still stand! If you have missed mass regularly, then run do not walk to confession, and get back to regular attendance. You will never regret it! And the graces are out of this world!

It just pains me to see so many people idly toss away their inheritance of heaven that Jesus died on the cross for us for.
I want to be in that number when the Saints go marchin’ in.
Hope you want it as well!

saoirse

It is an obligation but remember we do have free will. And many will unfortunately excersize that gift.

If one knows that they are bound to attend mass on Sunday (saturday eve) and Holy days of obligation. And has the ability to do so…and are not sick.and do not have to work…but intentionally skips mass for no good reason they are guilty of Mortal sin. Being in Mortal sin they place themselves by free will in a state outside of sanctifying grace. If a person does not confess a known mortal sin they remain cut off from sanctifying grace until they do so. If they die without performing the extremely simple task of making a good confession…and confessing known mortal sins…they will be damned in Hell Forever. Period.

Catholics, regardless of Rite, are required to attend either Mass or Divine Liturgy in any Rite of the Catholic Church on Sunday and Holy Days of Obligation. Sunday is technically a Holy Day of Obligation itself.

This means that I, as a Latin Catholic, can fulfill my Obligation by attending the Divine Liturgy in a Byzantine Catholic Church.

What is really complicating things is the practice of appointing lay persons or deacons as pastoral leaders in a parish and having only a Communion Service on Sunday. Attendance at such a service does not fulfill one’s Sunday obligation. A parishioner in such a situation would have to determine, in consultation with his or her confessor, whether the distance travelled to the nearest Sunday Mass would mitigate or eliminate the obligation. An elderly person who no longer drives and has no one to bring her to Mass would be excused. A healthy person who gladly drives to a mall an hour away to shop and to buy, better think long and hard about thinking that attendance at a Communion Service on Sunday at the local parish is good enough when the next parish is a fifteen minute drive away. Also, even if a person could not travel to attend Mass – what if you live in the middle of the Amazon basin? – there is no obligation to attend the Communion service. It certainly would be advisable, but not obligatory.

Is not going to Mass or missing Mass a mortal sin?
what about students who miss or parents who are to lazy to get out of bed?

Yes, usually missing mass on a Holy Day of Obligation AND on Sundays throughout the entire year is a mortal sin. However, if circumstances arise which prevent you from going to Mass, (and I don’t mean something like a trip to the Mall) it may not be a mortal sin. For instance, if you are seriously ill, you’re snowed in, your employer has you waiting to board a plane bound for Europe, etc. Students should not have too much trouble getting to Mass even on Holy Days of Obligation, which may fall during the week. Most Churches have evening Mass on these Holy Days, and of course, it is a rare thing to have class on Sundays. As for the parents refusing to take a child to Mass, I think it depends. For example how old is the child? If he/she drives and has a car, then there really is not an excuse is there. If the child is too young to drive and can find no way in which to go to Mass, then no mortal sin has been committed.

Wrong!!! Confession is necessary for being reconciled with the Church. Perfect contrition before death allows us to receive God’s forgiveness. In case of sudden death after contrition and before the intent of going to confession is satisfied, the person is forgiven by God.

I have wondered why the church made Mass attendance on Sunday, obligatory?

I mean, for those who have faith, not going to Mass as often as possible, is unthinkable.

Jim

Great question! I have tried to pose this before and never gotten anywhere. If it is such a wonderful thing to do, why does the Church feel it has to threaten people with eternal torture if they don’t do it? If I get more out of attending mass 6 mornings a week and skip Sunday, what possible reasoning is there to condemn me forever? Such legalism is unsupportable, especially given the rejection of Jewish legalism practiced by Jesus, who clearly said that the sabbath was made for man, not man of rthe sabbath.

I guess you could apply the rule that “if something doesn’t make sense, follow the money” and assume that the Church forses people there on Sunday so they can fill the collection basket…

Threaten people? How about inform people.

God is the one who made the rule. The Church is just making sure people are aware of it.

And who on earth would go to Mass everyday of the week and then choose to skip the day that is set aside to celebrate the resurection of our Lord? That is like coming to visit your father everyday of the week but skipping his birthday celebration because you already saw him yesterday.

Yes, what would you call it? A threat of eternal torture for not doing something which some people describe as a wonderful, not to be missed experience on a specific day of the week - as opposed to doing far more often but at other times?

How about inform people.

I’m informed and I’ve never met a Catholic who wasn’t (about this subject, I mean).

God is the one who made the rule. The Church is just making sure people are aware of it.

I think the rule originated somewhat later than God’s list of commandments. And anyway, I’m more than happy to keep Sunday holy.

And who on earth would go to Mass everyday of the week and then choose to skip the day that is set aside to celebrate the resurection of our Lord?

Me (and I do go on Easter).

That is like coming to visit your father everyday of the week but skipping his birthday celebration because you already saw him yesterday.

I would rather see my children six days a week rather than one, regardless of when my birthday is.

Yet this one came here asking the very question.

Clearly some are NOT informed about it. Letting people know what may happen to them if they choose to not Worship Him is not a threat, it is information.

I think the rule originated somewhat later than God’s list of commandments. And anyway, I’m more than happy to keep Sunday holy.

You think wrong.

Remember the Sabbath and keep it holy. That IS one of the commandments.

Me (and I do go on Easter).

I would rather see my children six days a week rather than one, regardless of when my birthday is

That is not the point. The point is why on earth, *if you were able, *would you CHOOSE to go see your child everyday and then CHOOSE not to go on a day set aside to celebrate something a little extra special? Talk about hurtful. “I love you but I have more important things to do today than celebrate this special day with you.”

This is not about someone who is not able to go on Sunday, this is about someone who would choose not to and justifies it by saying they went every other day.

Technically you are correct. However, perfect contrition is such a rare thing and so difficult to achieve due to our fallen nature, that I should think any reasonable person would be wary of passing up an opportunity to confess. Especially when one is close to death, it would be so simple for one’s contrition to be triggered by a fear of Hell rather than a love of God, thus rendering it imperfect and incapable of opening us up to God’s forgiveness. Although I would prefer to think otherwise, I’m afraid the truth is that I and pretty much everyone I know have never experienced true perfect contrition. My desire to confess and be reconciled is always tainted, even if only in part, by the desire to avoid Hell. It is never entirely due to my love for God and wish to avoid offending Him. This is the burden fallen man endures.

Because if it was not obligatory to go, a lot of people wouldn’t. Not everyone who goes to Mass on Sundays is really thrilled about being there:bigyikes: . And we all know that.

How many times have you seen people busily texting someone cleaning their fingernails,game playing reading something else besides a Missal or Bible, chatting away with the neighbor adjusting their IPODS or some other such non religious related activity? They don’t really want to be at the Mass but they have to be.

That attitude, I feel is one of the reasons the Church went to the Pauline Rite anyway and allowed as much experimentation with it as they did. It was an attempt to lure the faithful to Church with a Mass the Church thought would be more relevant and meaningful to the faithful but still adhere to the essentials. Something that the majority of the faithful would look forward to going to.

I would be willing to bet that if the Church dropped the mandatory requirement rule, attendance at a lot of parishes would be substantially smaller than it is now. I don’t like to think that, but I’ll bet you dime to a dollar its true.

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