Is Baptism necessary to be a Christian?


#1

I know there are those who believe the teachings of Christianity and intend to be baptized and there are those who intend to baptize their young. I understand also that God deals with each of us as individuals and He knows our hearts.

With all that in mind; my question - can a person be a Christian or honestly call himself a Christian if he has never been baptized according to proper form and never has the intention of being baptized? And I am presuming that the person has access to any number of avenues to be formally baptized but fails to do so. I also understand that any Christian baptism is valid if it is done with water, In the name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit.


#2

No. One who is unregenerate is not a Christian, but rather a heathen.


#3

Is Baptism necessary to be a Christian?

Yes.

Though of course one can start to follow Christ prior to reception of the Sacrament.


#4

[quote="jollybird, post:1, topic:324319"]
I know there are those who believe the teachings of Christianity and intend to be baptized and there are those who intend to baptize their young. I understand also that God deals with each of us as individuals and He knows our hearts.

With all that in mind; my question - can a person be a Christian or honestly call himself a Christian if he has never been baptized according to proper form and never has the intention of being baptized? And I am presuming that the person has access to any number of avenues to be formally baptized but fails to do so. I also understand that any Christian baptism is valid if it is done with water, In the name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit.

[/quote]

No.

A Christian is one who is baptized. This is Catholic teaching.


#5

There is a baptism of desire (desire to be baptized as soon as possible) and a baptism of martyrdom (obvious). Other than those two there is no other normative way to be a Christian. Of course, God can add to that as He Wills, however that is the way that we know to enter into the life of Christ.


#6
  1. What names are given to the first sacrament of initiation?

1213-1216
1276-1277

This sacrament is primarily called Baptism because of the central rite with which it is celebrated. To baptize means to “immerse” in water. The one who is baptized is immersed into the death of Christ and rises with him as a “new creature” (2 Corinthians 5:17). This sacrament is also called the “bath of regeneration and renewal in the Holy Spirit” (Titus 3:5); and it is called “enlightenment” because the baptized becomes “a son of light” (Ephesians 5:8).

vatican.va/archive/compendium_ccc/documents/archive_2005_compendium-ccc_en.html#The%20sacraments%20of%20Christian%20initiation


#7

[quote="jollybird, post:1, topic:324319"]
I know there are those who believe the teachings of Christianity and intend to be baptized and there are those who intend to baptize their young. I understand also that God deals with each of us as individuals and He knows our hearts.

With all that in mind; my question - *can a person be a Christian or honestly call himself a Christian if he has never been baptized according to proper form and never has the intention of being baptized? * And I am presuming that the person has access to any number of avenues to be formally baptized but fails to do so. I also understand that any Christian baptism is valid if it is done with water, In the name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit.

[/quote]

Lets start by reminding ourselves that Baptism is not only the method of formally entering the Church, it also cleanses our souls of the stain of Mortal Sin which we are all born with.

Not being a theologian or one schooled in Canon Law, I am only guessing, but since Baptism is the normal way of entering the Church, I would say no going by your scenario. If you never** intend **to be baptized, then you are in effect casting aside what Baptism accomplishes and if you willingly and knowingly do that, then I don't see much hope for you.


#8

Jesus Himself was baptized. And He started our Church, sooo…:shrug:

Yeah, you have to do what Jesus told us to do. Be baptized in the name of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit.


#9

Can you be a spouse without getting married?


#10

Yes, to be a Christian one must be baptized.

The following link is what the Catechism says about the Sacrament of Baptism:

vatican.va/archive/ccc_css/archive/catechism/p2s2c1a1.htm


#11

A faily member is Salvation Army, and when she was a baby the cristened her, but without water like with traditional baptism. I was always under the assumption that this was equivilant to baptism, would that be correct?:shrug:


#12

[quote="truthquester, post:11, topic:324319"]
A faily member is Salvation Army, and when she was a baby the cristened her, but without water like with traditional baptism. I was always under the assumption that this was equivilant to baptism, would that be correct?:shrug:

[/quote]

It was probably like a baby dedication that some Protestants who do not believe in baptizing children do.

Actually the Sally Ann does not use any sacraments at all esp Eucharist because they were founded to minister to alchoholics.


#13

[quote="truthquester, post:11, topic:324319"]
A faily member is Salvation Army, and when she was a baby the cristened her, but without water like with traditional baptism. I was always under the assumption that this was equivilant to baptism, would that be correct?:shrug:

[/quote]

It isn't; this person is not baptized, and is therefore not a Christian.


#14

[quote="Brigid34, post:5, topic:324319"]
There is a baptism of desire (desire to be baptized as soon as possible) and a baptism of martyrdom (obvious). .

[/quote]

Those two are the means by which the Grace of Baptism is conferred upon death. A 'Baptism of Desire' does not eliminate the need for a person to become Baptized. It only means that if they suffer death prior to a time where Baptism could have conferred, the Grace attendant to Baptism is given But that only happens at the time of death.


#15

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