Is Ecumenism still alive?


#1

I don’t know whether to say I’m more of an Ecumenist or an Apologist…

While I am eager to defend my Catholic faith, I am as eager to show Non-Catholic Christians that we believe more alike than most of them think.

Anyone share this view?


#2

I am of the same mentality as you. I am of the incontrovertible belief that what many dislike about the Catholic Church are mere misconceptions, and that many non-Catholic Christians separate themselves from the Church because they are either invincibly ignorant, or because they wish to persist in their misconceptions. If you think about it, apologetics is not really about showing the other party how wrong they are, but in demonstrating the Catholic faith FROM COMMON GROUND. We have most powerful exemplars to this type of apologetic. St. Paul on several occasions worked from common ground in order to convince his audience about the Truth of Christianity. For example, he convinced many Athenians to come to Christ by asserting that the unknown God they worshipped was one and the same God he worshipped. Down through history, the Church has not shied from utilizing the similarities between pagan belief and Christianity in order to attract non-believers to Christianity. Do not think that apologetics consists solely in attempting to demonstrate to others the error of their ways. That style has its place, but it is sometimes, perhaps oftentimes, not the best. If you think about it, our apologetic towards Protestants actually rests in our COMMON GROUND of Scripture, and our apologetic with the Orthodox rests in our COMMON GROUND in patristics.

Of course, the apologetic matter is different with non-Christians, but even with these, focusing on similarities will be a more effective method of witnessing for the faith than otherwise. Focusing on similarities first is the best way to demonstrate to non-Catholics, non-Christian or otherwise, that the Catholic faith is indeed and at least reasonable enough for them to consider. Get your foot in the door that way, and it will be easier thereafter.

God bless


#3

Amen, Amen…and as to the Awesome Fulton Sheen’s quote: More Amens!

Can you imagine how powerful Christian prayer, in general, would be if we were not so divided?

Even though we are the largest faith group in the world, we are the most divided. Pretty sad.

Even on the Catholic side. How wonderful The Passion was, but also how sad to see how divisive Mel Gibson is in his anti-Vatican2 sentiments.


#4

[quote=catholica]I don’t know whether to say I’m more of an Ecumenist or an Apologist…

While I am eager to defend my Catholic faith, I am as eager to show Non-Catholic Christians that we believe more alike than most of them think.

Anyone share this view?
[/quote]

I say God bless you and keep up the good work! Ecumenism and apologetics are not opposed–they only become so if people misinterpret ecumenism to mean an abandonment of truth claims, or apologetics to mean the attempt to make people convert (instead of presenting the truth as you believe it and letting the Holy Spirit do the rest).

Edwin


#5

You summarize perfectly.

To me: Ecumenism is celebrating what we have in common and Apologetics is defense/explanation of my faith.

I can only testify…and let the Holy Spirit do His thing.

It is so good to see so many good Christians here - regardless of the name on the Church door!
Peace and Blessings to all; especially to those who call Christ their Lord and Savior - but also to those who don’t.


#6

Is Ecumenism still alive?

Yes… both true and false.


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.