Is Holy Thursday a Holy day of Obligation?


#1

I’ve never missed Holy Thursday Mass before, but this year I’m alone with three young children, is it ok to miss?


#2

Today is NOT a holy day of obligation. Neither is Good Friday.


#3

Yes, you are not obligated to go. Be at peace! :slight_smile:


#4

I know, I was unable to attend today, I feel saddened by it.


#5

Thanks for your help. I still feel terrible about missing it, but it does make the evening easier for the children, and helps me conserve energy for tomorrow, since fasting while 5 months pregnant and alone with 3 little ones all day will not be easy…


#6

THere is no requirement for a pregnant woman to fast.


#7

Holy Thursday is not an obligation, but it’s a beautiful time to spend in Church. I attended the Chrism Mass this morning and the Mass of The Lord’s Supper @ 5PM

It was a blessed day :slight_smile:


#8

You probably don’t have to fast if you are pregnant. Maybe just abstain from meat.
Can someone enlighten me? Thanks.


#9

Thanks, 1ke.


#10

I don’t feel justified excusing myself on grounds of pregnancy, especially since we’re only required to fast twice a year and still allowed to eat a little bit of food. I could understand an excuse for a chemo patient who can only keep down a spoonful at a time, or a woman who actually gives birth on Good Friday, but the rest of us should be suffering on this day.


#11

The problem, and the reason, that you are excused is because you are not the only one suffering.

Your child is as well. You wouldn’t make a baby fast, or a very young child.


#12

I appreciate that, but eating half as much food for one day is not going to make my baby suffer. Babies are remarkably good at taking what they need from their mothers’ bodies. Look at all the women who are anemic, vegan, or chronically sick during pregnancy - their babies turn out fine. My baby is not feeling hungry inside my womb right now. Unless I start feeling faint, I plan to follow the standard rules for fasting today, then eat a big breakfast tomorrow and we’ll both be ok :slight_smile:


#13

Certainly up to you.

I did not fast when I was pregnant.


#14

Do be careful and cautious. There is NO requirement for a pregnant woman to fast, and most doctors and priests would recommend against it. If you feel a little off, go ahead and eat. And don’t assume that each pregnancy is the same, with one pregnancy you may be fine fasting, but with another you wouldn’t be.

Out of caution, I would do some other form of penance instead, like reading an extra chapter or two of Scripture.


#15

Thank you for your concern, I appreciate it. Btw I also joined the Church on 4/3/10 - congrats on your 4 years, and thanks be to God! :smiley:


#16

Awesome, and congrats to you too! God bless! :thumbsup:


#17

I realize I am a little late to the game, but something to consider for the future:

My father is a reproductive physiologist and he has done some animal studies regarding nutrition in utero and early life and its effects on the offspring. (His research is conducted primarily with cattle, occasionally with sheep.) He has found that poor nutrition during pregnancy and early in life can cause metabolic problems in the offspring. It can cause the baby’s body to “hoard” nutrients, predisposing the offspring to problems such as obesity. It also has a significant negative effect on future fertility in the offspring. The problems seem to be particularly severe in female offspring who suffer poor nutrition. The other issue is that if the baby takes nutrients that you need, you can suffer damage to your health as well.

I realize that you’re trying to do the best you can by the Church, and that you would never want to harm your baby. However, I think you need to consider the charitable repercussions of what you’re doing. Your baby needs nourishment. This is why pregnant women are told not to fast. Natural law requires that you provide adequately for your children, including those unborn. Divine positive law requires fasting. Natural law ALWAYS trumps divine positive law as not even God can change or dispense from natural law. Consequently the baby’s need for nourishment is more important than the Church’s requirement for you to fast. The point I’m trying to make is that I’d strongly encourage you not to fast in the future if you’re pregnant or breastfeeding, for the sake of charity towards your unborn child.


#18

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