Is it a liturgical abuse for a priest to leave the sanctuary for the homily?


#1

Hey everyone. In my parish our pastor often leaves the sanctuary and goes in between the two rows of pews for the homily. Is this a liturgical abuse?


#2

Not explicitly, no. The requirements (if I remember correctly) are that he deliver the homily from the chair, ambo, or, when appropriate, another suitable place.

Of course, now will come the debate as to whether the center aisle constitutes a “suitable place”


#3

[quote="Actaeon, post:2, topic:299819"]
Not explicitly, no. The requirements (if I remember correctly) are that he deliver the homily from the chair, ambo, or, when appropriate, another suitable place.

Of course, now will come the debate as to whether the center aisle constitutes a "suitable place"

[/quote]

I wish that they would stop doing it. Most the time I can't see them and hearing is them is worst.


#4

I don’t know but look at other examples.

My old parish when the church was being constructed we had to have mass in the local catholic primary (elementary) school library there was a table for the altar but no clear sanctuary.

Also what about masses done in people’s homes and what not?


#5

This is quite normal in the East


#6

How about a strongly worded letter to the Bishop citing liturgical abuse?


#7

[quote="Pilgrim1701, post:6, topic:299819"]
How about a strongly worded letter to the Bishop citing liturgical abuse?

[/quote]

Why?


#8

[quote="Pilgrim1701, post:6, topic:299819"]
How about a strongly worded letter to the Bishop citing liturgical abuse?

[/quote]

And when one's bishop does this - as ours does - then what? Report him to the Pope? Not a big deal.


#9

[quote="Pilgrim1701, post:6, topic:299819"]
How about a strongly worded letter to the Bishop citing liturgical abuse?

[/quote]

There is no abuse to "strongly" report. There is nothing wrong with this, and I would say at times it is very appropriate. Now on the other hand, there are times that the message should come from the ambo, as in authoritative messages such as a directive of the bishops.

I very seldom preach from the ambo, I stand and walk in front of the altar. I like to preach to the people and I make it a point to make eye contact but I do not walk down the aisle, it's not good to make the people turn around in their seat to see you; but that is my opinion only, there is no rubric against this.


#10

Our bishop never stays at the ambo either. At a couple of deacon funerals he walks up to the wife of the deceased deacon and preached his homily personally and directly to the wives. Don’t think I would go that far, but he is the bishop…:smiley:


#11

Typically; the Ambo would be the proper place because its a focal point for everything duly edifying to the Word of God, especially taking into consideration what the Ambo itself represents symbolically. The Homily itself should also edify the Word of God.

Moving off the sanctuary, strolling down the aisles to deliver his homily is far more of a distraction to me. Similarly; seeing priest leaving the sanctuary to wish people in the congregation the Peace of Christ shows irreverence to the Holy Presence of Jesus on the Altar. The Holy Sanctuary is the station of the priest from the beginning to the end of Mass.


#12

[quote="agnes_therese, post:7, topic:299819"]
Why?

[/quote]

[quote="Tarpeian_Rock, post:8, topic:299819"]
And when one's bishop does this - as ours does - then what? Report him to the Pope? Not a big deal.

[/quote]

[quote="Lapey, post:9, topic:299819"]
There is no abuse to "strongly" report. There is nothing wrong with this, and I would say at times it is very appropriate. Now on the other hand, there are times that the message should come from the ambo, as in authoritative messages such as a directive of the bishops.

I very seldom preach from the ambo, I stand and walk in front of the altar. I like to preach to the people and I make it a point to make eye contact but I do not walk down the aisle, it's not good to make the people turn around in their seat to see you; but that is my opinion only, there is no rubric against this.

[/quote]

I suppose my sarcasm was the lowest form of wit, even if it went unnoticed.:D
It has just been an observation of mine that people on these boards seem to be waiting in the pews for the first opportunity to 'pounce' on their priest, and then look for advice here :rolleyes: on how to deal with it. Generally its something fairly petty, and rather than talk to their priest directly they take the anonymous approach of sounding off on the 'interweb'; usually they are directed to take the other impersonal, possibly anonymous,and sometimes hostile approach of writing the aforementioned 'strongly worded letter'.


#13

Well, if it sounds like something that we might reasonably assume a person might assert (regardless of whether they’re reasonable in asserting it!), and there’s no indication of sarcasm (tone, or visual clues like emoticons or text formatting), how would we know it’s sarcasm? Through Divine Inspiration? :eek:

(That was sarcasm, btw… :cool:)


#14

Maybe he is making sure some are listening? Some do this for the children coming sacrament time, but when I look around me at mass, I can’t but help notice some adults not taking much notice.

Personally speaking myself, I think better when I am moving around. Maybe he gets greater inspiration walking around a bit, why don’t you ask him?


#15

[quote="Pilgrim1701, post:12, topic:299819"]
I suppose my sarcasm was the lowest form of wit, even if it went unnoticed.:D
It has just been an observation of mine that people on these boards seem to be waiting in the pews for the first opportunity to 'pounce' on their priest, and then look for advice here :rolleyes: on how to deal with it. Generally its something fairly petty, and rather than talk to their priest directly they take the anonymous approach of sounding off on the 'interweb'; usually they are directed to take the other impersonal, possibly anonymous,and sometimes hostile approach of writing the aforementioned 'strongly worded letter'.

[/quote]

:thumbsup:


#16

[quote="Gorgias, post:13, topic:299819"]
Well, i*f it sounds like something that we might reasonably assume a person might assert* (regardless of whether they're reasonable in asserting it!), and there's no indication of sarcasm (tone, or visual clues like emoticons or text formatting), how would we know it's sarcasm? Through Divine Inspiration? :eek:

(That was sarcasm, btw... :cool:)

[/quote]

And that's what's scary. That it seems to be a reasonable assertion. I thought the tone would have been implied in the curt and abrupt nature of the response which offered no support to the OP. How on earth did we manage in the days before smilies?:confused:


#17

No abuse. Like Deacon Lapey, I also sometimes leave the ambo to preach. It is strictly a matter of preferrence. I generally stay at the ambo because I prefer it, and because I have a practice of emphasizing points with my hands, so I want to be seen, but at youth Masses or Lifeteen Masses, I find it is easier to conect with the congregation if I move among them.

Fortuanately, our church is equiped with wireless mics, so hearing is not a problem for anyone, regardless of the location of the preacher (as long as he stays in the building, and now THAT may be an abuse :slight_smile: )


#18

I would prefer that priests stay in the sanctuary throughout Mass. There are three problems with preaching outside the sanctuary:

[LIST=1]
*]The symbolism of the ambo is lost.
*]It needlessly induces neck strain for those of us in the front pews, who were taught to look at people when they are speaking.
*]The priests who do this often impress too much of their own personality. (“He must increase, I must decrease”)
[/LIST]

It may not be a big deal/abuse, but please don’t do it.:blush:


#19

[quote="Pilgrim1701, post:6, topic:299819"]
How about a strongly worded letter to the Bishop citing liturgical abuse?

[/quote]

How can this be a liturgical abuse when no rubric is violated? Can't we leave our Bishops alone to worry about other more pressing problems. Peace, g.


#20

vatican.va/archive/ccc_css/archive/catechism/p2s1c2a1.htm
The Ambo

1184 The chair of the bishop (cathedra) or that of the priest "should express his office of presiding over the assembly and of directing prayer."63

The lectern (ambo): "The dignity of the Word of God requires the church to have a suitable place for announcing his message so that the attention of the people may be easily directed to that place during the liturgy of the Word."64

Pope John Paul II has asked that all the Church’s pastors use the Catechism of the Catholic Church “assiduously in fulfilling their mission of proclaiming the faith and calling people to the Gospel of life.” But how is the preacher to approach the Catechism from the perspective of homiletics so as to “make a very important contribution to that work of renewing the whole life of the Church?”

catholicliturgy.com/index.cfm/FuseAction/ArticleText/Index/65/SubIndex/120/ArticleIndex/5
The Catechism on Preaching (“Homily”)

The Context of Preaching

The preacher’s utterance proceeds from and participates in a permanent and definitive context: Jesus Christ, “the Father’s one, perfect, and unsurpassable Word.” Therefore, since “there will be no other word than this one,” the task of the preacher is to preach this Word Jesus.

To this end, the whole of Jesus’ human life invites penetrating scrutiny. For every visible aspect of the Lord’s life played a redemptive role in Revelation as “a sign of his mystery.” Even the least characteristics of Christ’s mysteries “manifest 'God’s love … among us.”’ For this reason, the Lord in his own preaching relied on “the signs of creation to make known the mysteries of the Kingdom of God,” since “from the greatness and beauty of created things comes a corresponding perception of their Creator.” Therefore, true preaching in the context of Christ demonstrates how “the whole of Christ’s life was. . . the actualization of his word and the fulfillment of Revelation.”

Authentic preaching in the context of God’s Word serves as a unifying force for God’s people, for "by his word … Jesus calls all people to come together around him." Yet, the preaching of Jesus is not selfdirected; his words reveal and personally refer us to the splendor of the Father. Preaching in the context of Christ means uniting others to the Father through Jesus, aided by the employment of every medium of communication.

To achieve this, the preacher requires a hermeneutic that enables him to understand and interpret the meaning of Christ’s life in context. “All that Jesus did and taught, from the beginning until the day when he was taken up to heaven, is to be seen in the light of the mysteries of Christmas and Easter.”

It is for this reason that the Eucharistic Liturgy provides the most appropriate context for preaching. The Catechism describes the homily as the extension of the proclamation of the Word of God that exhorts the faithful to accept God’s Word in all its fullness and to put it into practice.

Preaching possesses a relational power that participates ontologically in the efficacy of the Liturgy:

By means of the words, actions, and symbols that form the structure of a celebration, the Spirit puts both the faithful and the ministers into a living relationship with Christ, the Word and Image of the Father, so that they can live out the meaning of what they hear, contemplate, and do in the celebration.

Jesus Christ “inaugurated his Church by preaching the Good News, that is, the coming of the Reign of God, promised over the ages in the scriptures.” Thus, to preach in the context of Christ also means embracing what Jesus preached - the Beatitudes, the Kingdom of God, conversion, and the Decalogue.

The manner of the Lord’s preaching was as important as his message. His characteristic parables ask for a radical choice on the part of the hearer: “to gain the kingdom, one must give everything.”

To whom did Jesus preach? “In the Church’s preaching this call [to conversion] is addressed first to those who do not yet know Christ and his Gospel.” “Jesus is sent to preach good news to the poor.” “The Gospel was preached even to the dead. The descent into hell brings the Gospel message of salvation to complete fulfillment.” In short, the preaching of Christ addresses those in need of hope, and “Christian hope unfolds from the beginning of Jesus’ preaching in the proclamation of the beatitudes.”


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