Is it a sin if you didn't know it was a sin?


#1

Okay so before starting, those who have seen some of my previous posts i have talked to my priest about scrupulously and I feel i am making progress, but anyway heres my question:

So I realised in my past I have perhaps talked bad about somebodies faults (in my case academically) I remember that, and I try not to insult people or talk about their faults but, this popped into my head and I found out it is Detraction and since knowing it was Detraction I will try to not commit it or talk about peoples faults in the future.

But here is my question is it still a sin if I was not aware that it was a sin , I would say I do not like to talk about peoples thoughts but when I mentioned this it was quite a while ago now so is it still as in?

And on the terms of detraction what happens if you are about someones faults to their face for example I was playing my some of my friends and in a jokey sort of way I was like "You're so bad" in a joking sense. Is that Detraction of is Detraction like talking behind somebodies back like gossiping or something.

I also know I am scrupulous but I would like to think I am making advancements and I am not worrying about things that much anymore, for example I would usually started to worry about how playing a video game may be sinful for example killing people, or declaring unlawful war but then I reminded myself that it is just a game and not real life, I do feel like I am making improvements but this is an issue that is confusing me.

As an added note are you supposed to go to confession for venial sins? Or just mortal sins as I think I have been going for both but not sure if your supposed to go to confession for venial sins.


#2

The simple answer is yes. Once you know that something you did in the past was sinful (even though at the time you were unaware of it’s sinful nature) you are guilty of the sin.

However because you were unaware of the sin at the time you committed it, the gravity of the sin is reduced. Even sins that would be mortal sins would not be because you did not know the gravity of that sin.

You do not have to confess venial sins, only mortal sins. But it is still a good practice to confess venial sins as well. While I don’t recommend it for the long term, something to try would be not to confess venial sins temporarily and have trust in Gods Mercy. This might help with being scrupulous. If you do try that, discuss it with your confessor first.


#3

[quote="spiderweb, post:2, topic:327198"]
The simple answer is yes. Once you know that something you did in the past was sinful (even though at the time you were unaware of it's sinful nature) you are guilty of the sin.

However because you were unaware of the sin at the time you committed it, the gravity of the sin is reduced. Even sins that would be mortal sins would not be because you did not know the gravity of that sin.

You do not have to confess venial sins, only mortal sins. But it is still a good practice to confess venial sins as well. While I don't recommend it for the long term, something to try would be not to confess venial sins temporarily and have trust in Gods Mercy. This might help with being scrupulous. If you do try that, discuss it with your confessor first.

[/quote]

Ok so bearing in mind what you have said, as what I have described should I take this to my confessor or just ask for Gods forgiveness and try not to do it again in the future.
Yes I may also bring that up with my confessor


#4

you might find this interesting

TRESPASSES AND SINS AND THEIR EFFECT ON CHARACTER

“All unrighteousness is sin: and there
is a sin not unto death.”–1 John 5:17.

WE SHOULD recognize a distinction between trespasses and sins.

A sin is that which is more or less wilfully and intentionally committed.

A trespass is a sin in a certain sense, but one committed without intention.

The fact that a sin is called a trespass would imply that it was not done wilfully. The Divine Law stands whether we are able to keep it or not; and every violation of the Divine Law is a sin in one sense.

But those violations of God’s Law which are wholly the result of our unavoidable weaknesses are not culpable sins, and hence not in the same category with sins more or less wilful.

So far as the world is concerned, it is already under condemnation for sin.

Those who have accepted Christ and have received the forgiveness of their sins through Him, are spoken of by the Apostle Paul as those whose sins “are past, through the forbearance of God.” (Romans 3:25.)

Because of their consecration of their lives to be the followers of Christ these sins are forever gone, so far as responsibility for their transgressions is concerned.

From this time on the Lord’s people are counted no more as sinners, but as saints whose whole lives have been devoted to righteousness.

Nevertheless, we have this treasure of the New Creature in earthen vessels, our mortal bodies.

The New Creature in Christ does not expect to practise sin any more;

for if he should sin wilfully, this would mean his entire repudiation of the Covenant into which he has entered with the Lord.

But notwithstanding this, he will commit trespasses;

for he has merely the good intentions of the heart, with only an imperfect body in which to operate.

The Apostles recognized this fact.

St. Paul declared that in his flesh dwelt no perfection. St. John says that whosoever says that he has no sin deceives himself, and the Truth is not in him. (1 John 1:8-10.)

This same Apostle, in the same Epistle, declares that whoever sins is of the Devil.

In this last text he evidently refers to the practise of sin, to wilful sin, not to unavoidable trespasses;

for he has just said that all commit these unintentional violations of God’s Law. St. James says that in many things we all offend. (James 3:2.)

To will is present with every consecrated child of God; but how to perform is the problem.


#5

I can't resist...

http://f.kulfoto.com/pic/0001/0044/X64rx43049.jpg


#6
  1. Since you mention scruples – be sure to have a “regular confessor” to direct one. Such is the age old approach.

  2. Regarding confession of venial sins. They can be forgiven in many ways (prayer, act of contrition, reading Sacred Scripture even contributes to their forgivness…). We can pray each day “forgive us our trespasses…” in the Lords Prayer (in various places in the early Church they prayed it three times a day…)

But having said that it is good to confess at least some.

Catechism:

1458 Without being strictly necessary, confession of everyday faults (venial sins) is nevertheless strongly recommended by the Church.59 Indeed the regular confession of our venial sins helps us form our conscience, fight against evil tendencies, let ourselves be healed by Christ and progress in the life of the Spirit. By receiving more frequently through this sacrament the gift of the Father’s mercy, we are spurred to be merciful as he is merciful.

scborromeo.org/ccc/p2s2c2a4.htm#VII


#7

[quote="catanswer, post:4, topic:327198"]

WE SHOULD recognize a distinction between trespasses and sins.

A sin is that which is more or less wilfully and intentionally committed.

A trespass is a sin in a certain sense, but one committed without intention.

[/quote]

They really are the same thing...."forgive us our trespasses...."

But yes there are sins that are less deliberate etc and where there is even no culpability (material sins).


#8
  1. Since you mention scruples -- be sure to have a "regular confessor" to direct one. Such is the age old approach.

  2. If I do not have a clue say that Y is a sin and I do it innocently thinking it is good -- am I guilty of sin? No not really....

(as to your personal questions -- it is best to discuss with your confessor)

  1. Regarding confession of venial sins. They can be forgiven in many ways (prayer, act of contrition, reading Sacred Scripture even contributes to their forgivness....). We can pray each day "forgive us our trespasses...." in the Lords Prayer (in various places in the early Church they prayed it three times a day....)

But having said that it is good to confess at least some.

Catechism:

1458 Without being strictly necessary, confession of everyday faults (venial sins) is nevertheless strongly recommended by the Church.59 Indeed the regular confession of our venial sins helps us form our conscience, fight against evil tendencies, let ourselves be healed by Christ and progress in the life of the Spirit. By receiving more frequently through this sacrament the gift of the Father's mercy, we are spurred to be merciful as he is merciful.

scborromeo.org/ccc/p2s2c2a4.htm#VII


#9

Is it a sin if you didn't know it was a sin?

no


#10

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.