Is it a sin to believe either in part or as a whole books not considered canonical?


#1

I was wondering what’s the RCC decision regarding a person believing on any books not considered canonical? Or if one only believes certain parts of a particular book, would that be a sin?

I had noted on a previous thread I started that I had a KJV 1611 Bible with the books of the apocrypha in it. But I was told that 1st and 2nd Esdras as well as The Prayer of Manasses were not canonical. Anyone know why?

And on the same topic, anyone know of a resource, either online or in a book, that talks about all the books that were not considered canonical by the RCC and explains why?

Thank you, God bless.

Nelson


#2

First, it’s not just the “RCC” who determined and follows the canon, but the whole Catholic Church. So, just for the sake of being precise, it would be better to use “CC” instead of “RCC” in this case.

What do you mean by “belief”? Perhaps it would help to answer the question if I knew what you meant by the word. Do you mean merely helpful to you or especially inspiring; or you think the author is a holy person and thus insightful; or that privately you think the author got some divine inspiration; or do you think that the CC left out some books that you think should have been included?

The Church used several criteria: one was its use in the liturgy. I’m sure others can help you with more details.


#3

The Catholic Encyclopedia on line has answers to your questions

newadvent.org/cathen/10737c.htm

You might also be able to find some info on Wikipedia

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Book_Of_Esdras

Hope this helps!

God Bless!


#4

[quote=DaMaMaXiMuS]I was wondering what’s the RCC decision regarding a person believing on any books not considered canonical? Or if one only believes certain parts of a particular book, would that be a sin?

I had noted on a previous thread I started that I had a KJV 1611 Bible with the books of the apocrypha in it. But I was told that 1st and 2nd Esdras as well as The Prayer of Manasses were not canonical. Anyone know why?

And on the same topic, anyone know of a resource, either online or in a book, that talks about all the books that were not considered canonical by the RCC and explains why?

Thank you, God bless.

Nelson
[/quote]

As Catholics we must believe the Canon of Scripture as decreed by the Council of Trent. If you are a Catholic, and wilfully reject this teaching then you are committing grave sin.

1st and 2nd Esdras are part of the Canonical Scriptures as put forth from the Council of Trent. Today in modern versions of Catholic Bibles they are combined and called the book of Nehemiah.

In the original KJV they have 1 and 2 Esdras as well as 1 and 2 Maccabes but list them as Apocrypha.

First and foremost the reasons for this is to reject Catholic teaching concerning Purgatory. On a other level the reasons given is because the Septuagint is the version that includes those books.

Ken


#5

What about 3rd and 4th Maccabes?


#6

[quote=trumpet152]What about 3rd and 4th Maccabes?
[/quote]

The Council of Trent listed the Canonical books of Scripture. And the books you mention I personally do not know of yet Trent decreed what was Scripture as shown below:

**Canons and Decrees of the Council of Trent **The Fourth Session

Celebrated on the eighth day of the month of April, in the year 1546.

Decree Concerning the Canonical Scriptures
The sacred and holy, ecumenical, and general Synod of Trent,–lawfully assembled in the Holy Ghost, the Same three legates of the Apostolic See presiding therein,–keeping this always in view, that, errors being removed, the purity itself of the Gospel be preserved in the Church; which (Gospel), before promised through the prophets in the holy Scriptures, our Lord Jesus Christ, the Son of God, first promulgated with His own mouth, and then commanded to be preached by His Apostles to every creature, as the fountain of all, both saving truth, and moral discipline; and seeing clearly that this truth and discipline are contained in the written books, and the unwritten traditions which, received by the Apostles from the mouth of Christ himself, or from the Apostles themselves, the Holy Ghost dictating, have come down even unto us, transmitted as it were from hand to hand; (the Synod) following the examples of the orthodox Fathers, receives and venerates with an equal affection of piety, and reverence, all the books both of the Old and of the New Testament–seeing that one God is the author of both --as also the said traditions, as well those appertaining to faith as to morals, as having been dictated, either by Christ’s own word of mouth, or by the Holy Ghost, and preserved in the Catholic Church by a continuous succession.

And it has thought it meet that a list of the sacred books be inserted in this decree, lest a doubt may arise in any one’s mind, which are the books that are received by this Synod. They are as set down here below:

Of the Old Testament: the five books of Moses, to wit, Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy; Josue, Judges, Ruth, four books of Kings, two of Paralipomenon, the first book of Esdras, and the second which is entitled Nehemias; Tobias, Judith, Esther, Job, the Davidical Psalter, consisting of a hundred and fifty psalms; the Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, the Canticle of Canticles, Wisdom, Ecclesiasticus, Isaias, Jeremias, with Baruch; Ezechiel, Daniel; the twelve minor prophets, to wit, Osee, Joel, Amos, Abdias, Jonas, Micheas, Nahum, Habacuc, Sophonias, Aggaeus, Zacharias, Malachias; two books of the Machabees, the first and the second.

Of the New Testament: the four Gospels, according to Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John; the Acts of the Apostles written by Luke the Evangelist; fourteen epistles of Paul the apostle, (one) to the Romans, two to the Corinthians, (one) to the Galatians, to the Ephesians, to the Philippians, to the Colossians, two to the Thessalonians, two to Timothy, (one) to Titus, to Philemon, to the Hebrews; two of Peter the apostle, three of John the apostle, one of the apostle James, one of Jude the apostle, and the Apocalypse of John the apostle.

But if any one receive not, as sacred and canonical, the said books entire with all their parts, as they have been used to be read in the Catholic Church, and as they are contained in the old Latin vulgate edition; and knowingly and deliberately contemn the traditions aforesaid; let him be anathema. Let all, therefore, understand, in what order, and in what manner, the said Synod, after having laid the foundation of the Confession of faith, will proceed, and what testimonies and authorities it will mainly use in confirming dogmas, and in restoring morals in the Church.

Decree Concerning the Edition and the Use of the Sacred Books

Moreover, the same sacred and holy Synod,–considering that no small utility may accrue to the Church of God, if it be made known which out of all the Latin editions, now in circulation, of the sacred books, is to be held as authentic,–ordains and declares, that the said old and vulgate edition, which, by the lengthened usage of so many years, has been approved of in the Church, be, in public lectures, disputations, sermons and expositions, held as authentic; and that no one is to dare, or presume to reject it under any pretext whatever.

(Continued in next post)


#7

(Continued from last post)

Furthermore, in order to restrain petulant spirits, It decrees, that no one, relying on his own skill, shall,–in matters of faith, and of morals pertaining to the edification of Christian doctrine, --wresting the sacred Scripture to his own senses, presume to interpret the said sacred Scripture contrary to that sense which holy mother Church,–whose it is to judge of the true sense and interpretation of the holy Scriptures,–hath held and doth hold; or even contrary to the unanimous consent of the Fathers; even though such interpretations were never (intended) to be at any time published. Contraveners shall be made known by their Ordinaries, and be punished with the penalties by law established.

And wishing, as is just, to impose a restraint, in this matter, also on printers, who now without restraint,–thinking, that is, that whatsoever they please is allowed them,–print, without the license of ecclesiastical superiors, the said books of sacred Scripture, and the notes and comments upon them of all persons indifferently, with the press ofttimes unnamed, often even fictitious, and what is more grievous still, without the author’s name; and also keep for indiscriminate sale books of this kind printed elsewhere; (this Synod) ordains and decrees, that, henceforth, the sacred Scripture, and especially the said old and vulgate edition, be printed in the most correct manner possible; and that it shall not be lawful for any one to print, or cause to be printed, any books whatever, on sacred matters, without the name of the author; nor to sell them in future, or even to keep them, unless they shall have been first examined, and approved of, by the Ordinary; under pain of the anathema and fine imposed in a canon of the last Council of Lateran: and, if they be Regulars, besides this examination and approval, they shall be bound to obtain a license also from their own superiors, who shall have examined the books according to the form of their own statutes. As to those who lend, or circulate them in manuscript, without their having been first examined, and approved of, they shall be subjected to the same penalties as printers: and they who shall have them in their possession or shall read them, shall, unless they discover the authors, be themselves regarded as the authors. And the said approbation of books of this kind shall be given in writing; and for this end it shall appear authentically at the beginning of the book, whether the book be written, or printed; and all this, that is, both the approbation and the examination, shall be done gratis, that so what ought to be approved, may be approved, and what ought to be condemned, may be condemned.

Besides the above, wishing to repress that temerity, by which the words and sentences of sacred Scripture are turned and twisted to all sorts of profane uses, to wit, to things scurrilous, fabulous, vain, to flatteries, detractions, superstitions, impious and diabolical incantations, sorceries, and defamatory libels; (the Synod) commands and enjoins, for the doing away with this kind of irreverence and contempt, and that no one may hence forth dare in any way to apply the words of sacred Scripture to these and such like purposes; that all men of this description, profaners and violators of the word of God, be by the bishops restrained by the penalties of law, and others of their own appointment.


#8

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