Is it a sin to laugh at some Church song's lyrics?

First of all, I’m a teenager. Then, I want to know if it is a sin to laugh at some lyrics from Church songs. For example, there is this song that says “Holy Spirit, turn me on, light me on fire” obviously not with a sexual nor a piromaniac sense, but we still laughed. Is it a sin?

I sure hope not. We do it all of the time. Some of the modern songs sound like the same tune to My LIttle Pony. Even our priest was making fun of the guitar music once- he said “welcome to St. Michael’s lounge and piano bar… drinks are $5.99.” Of course, he did not say this in front of the congregation or the musicians. I think it is hard NOT to make fun of some of the lyrics in the modern missals.:wink:

I don’t literally laugh, but I do shake my head sadly at some of the lyrics. I don’t consider myself qualified to state whether or not laughing at them is a sin.

If you’re at Mass, at the very least it’s not being mindful of where you are.
People often get the giggles in church. I do, and I am ashamed after.

True that.

I go nuts every time they sing “Morning has Broken”. I think “Who are we worshipping? God or Dr Doolittle!”

I wouldn’t say it is a sin, but you should see it as a learning experience. Basically you are applying the vernacular ( the language of today) to the glorious language of the past. Of course as a teenager the language you use is ultra important, but just remember, that is because it is “in style”. When something is in style, that implies that it will go out of style. Its temporary.

Don’t get too caught up in the “now” of culture, and rather reflect on the original meaning of the lyrics in the songs. Peace out.

Very true, but let’s face it, it is hard not to put the lyrics of the Edmund Fitsgerald into “gather us in.” (blech)

It is a hymn of thanks to God for spring time:

Origins

The hymn originally appeared in the second edition of Songs of Praise (published in 1931), to the tune “Bunessan”, composed in the Scottish Highlands. In Songs of Praise Discussed, the editor, Percy Dearmer, explains that as there was need for a hymn to give thanks for each day, English poet and children’s author Eleanor Farjeon had been “asked to make a poem to fit the lovely Scottish tune”. A slight variation on the original hymn, also written by Eleanor Farjeon, can be found in the form of a poem contributed to the anthology Children’s Bells, under Farjeon’s new title, “A Morning Song (For the First Day of Spring)”, published by Oxford University Press in 1957. The song is noted in 9/4 time but with a 3/4 feel.

“Bunessan” had been found in L. McBean’s Songs and Hymns of the Gael, published in 1900.[3] Before Farjeon’s words, the tune was used as a Christmas carol, which began “Child in the manger, Infant of Mary”, translated from the Scottish Gaelic lyrics written by Mary MacDonald. The English-language Roman Catholic hymnal also uses the tune for the Charles Stanford hymns “Christ Be Beside Me” and “This Day God Gives Me”, both of which were adapted from the traditional Irish hymn St. Patrick’s Breastplate. Another Christian hymn “Baptized In Water” borrows the tune.

It is no more pagan or modern than St. Francis’ “Canticle of Creation.” The line from MHB “where his feet trod” is a reference to God walking in the Garden of Eden. A hymn doesn’t need to mention God directly to be a hymn of praise to him. :slight_smile:

As for finding song lyrics funny, I see nothing wrong with that if they are funny/odd. I can’t stand “Gather Us In.” The lyrics are theologically inane besides being silly and banal. I grit my teeth every time it’s played–thankfully our parish hasn’t used it in quite a while.

I just love those talking blackbirds…

It’s just a poetic phrase. :slight_smile: Blackbirds do “talk” to each other. They’re quite intelligent birds.

I love Morning has Broken. Here’s more information about that lovely hymn:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morning_Has_Broken#Origins

Origins[edit]
The hymn originally appeared in the second edition of Songs of Praise (published in 1931), to the tune “Bunessan”, composed in the Scottish Highlands. In Songs of Praise Discussed, the editor, Percy Dearmer, explains that as there was need for a hymn to give thanks for each day, English poet and children’s author Eleanor Farjeon had been “asked to make a poem to fit the lovely Scottish tune”. A slight variation on the original hymn, also written by Eleanor Farjeon, can be found in the form of a poem contributed to the anthology Children’s Bells, under Farjeon’s new title, “A Morning Song (For the First Day of Spring)”, published by Oxford University Press in 1957. The song is noted in 9/4 time but with a 3/4 feel.

“Bunessan” had been found in L. McBean’s Songs and Hymns of the Gael, published in 1900.[3] Before Farjeon’s words, the tune was used as a Christmas carol, which began “Child in the manger, Infant of Mary”, translated from the Scottish Gaelic lyrics written by Mary MacDonald. The English-language Roman Catholic hymnal also uses the tune for the Charles Stanford hymns “Christ Be Beside Me” and “This Day God Gives Me”, both of which were adapted from the traditional Irish hymn St. Patrick’s Breastplate. Another Christian hymn “Baptized In Water” borrows the tune.

Verse 3#

*Here we will take the wine and the water.
Here we will take the bread of new birth,
Here You shall call Your sons and Your daughters,
Call us anew to be salt for the earth.
Give us to drink the wine of compassion,
Give us to eat the bread that is You
Nourish us well, and teach us to fashion
Lives that are holy and hearts that are true. *

People really have a problem with these words…really?
Sounds like the Gospel message to me…
:rolleyes:

And they work almost perfectly with this: youtube.com/watch?v=9vST6hVRj2A

Preceded by two verses of questionable theology and banality. Not to mention the sing-songy melody that sounds like it was composed by a group of kindergarteners. :rolleyes:

The hymn writer was too lazy to get someone to compose a tune, so he used a pop song.
:frowning:

:thumbsup:

I keep expecting them to follow it up with the Barney song-after all its all about love…

:rotfl: I wouldn’t be surprised if a Barney song were to follow the way some parish music programs are run. :stuck_out_tongue:

I have never made it to third verse as I am generally in the restroom as the result of the nausea that overcomes me when I hear to opening notes.

You do realize that the now-outlawed “Gloria” was the same tune as “my little pony,” don’t you?

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