Is it a sin to obey the sabbath (attend mass) and take the Eucharist when not in a state of grace?


#1

I thought I had read/heard somewhere that it is a sin to attend mass when a person is not in a state of grace, ie: has committed mortal sin and has not yet been to confession. Is this true?

It would be a good idea to NOT go to mass if a person isn't in a state of grace, right? If it isn't possible to go to confession before Sunday and a person isn't in a state of grace, shouldn't they avoid mass?

I thought it is a sin to consume the Eucharist while not in a state of grace. I would like to confirm this, and if possible have someone provide an official explanation. Thanks! :D


#2

No this is not true. You have an obligation to attend Mass on all Sundays and Holy Days of Obligation, regardless of whether or not you are in a state of grace.

No, it is a bad idea as it is a mortal sin to miss Mass.

No. They are obligated to attend Mass and to do otherwise adds another mortal sin in need of confession.

This is correct.

But that does not mean you skip Mass. It means you go to Mass and remain in your pew during Communion.


#3

When one is in a state of mortal sin they are always obliged to attend Holy Mass. Attending Mass while in a state of mortal sin isn't a sin. When at Mass in a state of mortal sin you are not to receive the Body and Blood of Jesus Christ.
The Catechism of the Catholic Church says:
A person who is conscious of grave sin is not to celebrate Mass or receive the body of the Lord without previous sacramental confession unless there is a grave reason and there is no opportunity to confess; in this case the person is to remember the obligation to make an act of perfect contrition, which includes the resolution of confessing as soon as possible. (CIC 916)

I suggest you read: catholic.com/quickquestions/can-someone-who-has-committed-a-mortal-sin-receive-communion-if-he-makes-a-perfect-ac


#4

Is it a sin to go on Saturdays rather than Sundays? I think if it is, it would be too much of a technicality…


#5

Yes, can (and must) go to mass, regardless of state of grace.

No, cannot receive the Eucharist unless one is in a state of grace.

So a person must go to Mass, regardless. They just cannot receive, until they've confess all known mortal sins (been absolved) and are in a state of grace.


#6

[quote="DavidSears, post:4, topic:312751"]
Is it a sin to go on Saturdays rather than Sundays? I think if it is, it would be too much of a technicality...

[/quote]

What is bound on Earth is bound in Heaven -- if the Church says that we can fulfill our Sunday obligation with a Saturday evening ANTICIPATED SUNDAY Mass, then we fulfill our obligation. Saturday's Mass for Saturday is not the same thing -- that's a daily Mass.

Sins are not determined by "technicality" but rather by the intent of the actor.


#7

[quote="JMody, post:6, topic:312751"]
What is bound on Earth is bound in Heaven -- if the Church says that we can fulfill our Sunday obligation with a Saturday evening ANTICIPATED SUNDAY Mass, then we fulfill our obligation. Saturday's Mass for Saturday is not the same thing -- that's a daily Mass.

Sins are not determined by "technicality" but rather by the intent of the actor.

[/quote]

So... It's a sin to go to mass on Saturday instead of Sunday?


#8

[quote="DavidSears, post:7, topic:312751"]
So... It's a sin to go to mass on Saturday instead of Sunday?

[/quote]

The Saturday "anticipated mass" (sometimes referred to in common parlance as the vigil mass) is counted as a Sunday mass - you'll note it uses the Sunday form and readings. The regular Saturday masses are not, and cannot be substituted for a Sunday mass. This goes the other way as well - in cases of a holy day of obligation that falls on a Saturday, the evening anticipated mass for Sunday does not fulfill the obligation for the holy day, but for the Sunday after it.


#9

[quote="DarkLight, post:8, topic:312751"]
The Saturday "anticipated mass" (sometimes referred to in common parlance as the vigil mass) is counted as a Sunday mass - you'll note it uses the Sunday form and readings. The regular Saturday masses are not, and cannot be substituted for a Sunday mass. This goes the other way as well - in cases of a holy day of obligation that falls on a Saturday, the evening anticipated mass for Sunday does not fulfill the obligation for the holy day, but for the Sunday after it.

[/quote]

Thank you! That makes sense.


#10

[quote="filter2700, post:1, topic:312751"]
I thought I had read/heard somewhere that it is a sin to attend mass when a person is not in a state of grace, ie: has committed mortal sin and has not yet been to confession. Is this true?

It would be a good idea to NOT go to mass if a person isn't in a state of grace, right? If it isn't possible to go to confession before Sunday and a person isn't in a state of grace, shouldn't they avoid mass?

I thought it is a sin to consume the Eucharist while not in a state of grace. I would like to confirm this, and if possible have someone provide an official explanation. Thanks! :D

[/quote]

No. Anyone can attend Mass, and Catholics are required to attend Mass on Sunday or Saturday night at least once, whether they receive Holy Communion or not.

A person should not receive Holy Communion if they have committed a serious sin since their last confession. A person can certainly go to Mass without receiving Holy Communion. Just don't get in line. :shrug:


#11

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