Is it licit to have mass in a house?


#1

Okay, so at my college Catholic Club, we had a little house that served as the catholic student center. Anyway, we always had our mass their, and I was just wondering. Was it a licit mass? Everything seemed fine. The only thing I’m kind of suspicious of was that we held hands during communion, and stood around our table turned altar, but it was a really small group, so I always justified it as that. I really don’t know if it was licit or not though. Fortunately we sold the house and moved to the parish, which worked out great


#2

Yes, you can have a Mass inside of a house. Some households of consecrated religious celebrate in their homes.


#3

I think a house is where Our Lord instituted the mass in the first place, and if you read the NT, that’s where the early masses took place most of the time.


#4

As a general rule, a priest needs permission to celebrate Mass outside a Church or what canon law calls “a sacred place”. If this house is the Catholic Student Center, in most likelyhood, the priest has obtained permission to say Mass there.


#5

Many campus ministries have a house/building near the campus. The local parish is not always convenient for students without a car. The setup I am most familiar with is a small house that have a chapel (approval from the Bishop), a different meeting room/lounge, offices for the staff, and private rooms for the chaplain - unless he is in residence at the parish rectory.

When I was at school at a large state university, we had Masses in certain lecture halls in order to offer students convenient times and places for Mass. Yes, the bishop knew and yes the bishop had approved.


#6

Thanks, I just wanted to know. Also, we moved to the parish because we were in a town of about 6000 and the parish wasn’t far from our college


#7

Is this on a regular basis?

I believe it’s licit as long as it follows the rules of a “private” Mass.


#8

Right on, Pro Vobis! We’ve several “private” Masses near us in the past several years.


#9

If that’s the case, you’re good to go (of course, as long as the eucharist is treated with reverence)!


#10

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