Is it ok to like the villains?

The big baddies are always my favorite characters in fiction. I love hammy villains, flamboyant, devious ones, interesting psychologically scarred ones...is this ok? I mean, I don't support the villain or too for them, I just looove watching them.

Sure. I mean, if the villains weren't intersting, the writers wouldn'tbe doing their jobs, eh? I can find a villain intersting, evenhave them be my favs, without supporting them, Like, I watch Charmed, and half the time the stuff going on with the demons is twice as intersting as anything with the main characters. Got to the point where I was HOPING the Demon of Fear would give those girls the ax :rolleyes:

[quote="Valley_Lily, post:1, topic:215399"]
The big baddies are always my favorite characters in fiction. I love hammy villains, flamboyant, devious ones, interesting psychologically scarred ones...is this ok? I mean, I don't support the villain or too for them, I just looove watching them.

[/quote]

Hi.

The key here is that the villains are in *fictional *works.

It's not a problem at all to appreciate a villain in movies and TV. In fact, if you are enjoying them, the writers of the work have done their job by making the character believable in act and deed.

Now, if you enjoy a villain (or concepts of fantasy, such as the occult or magic) so much that you think that his/her actions could be applied to your life in some capacity, that's another story. Be knowledgeable in your faith and don't lead yourself into temptation by entertainment that questions your faith. For instance, I love "The Matrix" movie series. Does that mean that I will follow the tenets of the movies? No. It's heavily riddled with Buddhist concepts, not Catholic.

To enjoy a villain makes us appreciate the problems of our fallen humanity and how some fight that impulse (the hero)--or just succumb to it altogether (the villain).

Authors often toss a seemingly redeeming quality into their evil characters persona to make evil interesting.

Of late, there have been two shows on Satan, where he displays acts of charity in one hand to humans and then display acts of evil against demons who don't perform as he requires.

It is logical that Satan would be capable of displaying acts of love toward humans to entice them toward evil. Once a soul is caught into eternity, then the true acts of vengence toward humanity and God are met out.

It’s okay as long as you don’t over do it and root for evil in the real world.

I think Darth Caedus is sort of cool in the Star Wars series. As are some other heroes in the video game/literature field.

When it comes to Iago or or Richard III in Shakespeare, than I draw the line because it’s much more realistic. Same with Dickens villians.

[quote="Barbkw, post:4, topic:215399"]
Authors often toss a seemingly redeeming quality into their evil characters persona to make evil interesting.

Of late, there have been two shows on Satan, where he displays acts of charity in one hand to humans and then display acts of evil against demons who don't perform as he requires.

It is logical that Satan would be capable of displaying acts of love toward humans to entice them toward evil. Once a soul is caught into eternity, then the true acts of vengence toward humanity and God are met out.

[/quote]

I actually love it when shows do that, add in redeaming or likeable qualities in an evil character, because it makes it far more believable, especially if the villain is human.

There are very, VERY few people in the world who are truly, iredeambly evil. Some people want to get up in arms if a villain is shown as being anything less than a complete monster, but really, evil is beautiful, It's sexy, seductive. But it's dangerous as hell (no pun intended) and I think a good villain will have all those qualities. Otherwise you just have perfect, untouched saints trumphing over ghastly, blood thirsty monsters, and that's just not good writing.

An interesting question to ask: WHY do writers/producers/directors, etc., feel the need to 'glamourize' evil at all?

[quote="Rascalking, post:5, topic:215399"]
It's okay as long as you don't over do it and root for evil in the real world.

I think Darth Caedus is sort of cool in the Star Wars series. As are some other heroes in the video game/literature field.

When it comes to Iago or or Richard III in Shakespeare, than I draw the line because it's much more realistic. Same with Dickens villians.

[/quote]

I like the more fantastical villains as well. I'm with OP with the baddie love, i suppose. It may just be that most of what i watch IS fantasy, but still.

[quote="Sailor_Kenshin, post:7, topic:215399"]
An interesting question to ask: WHY do writers/producers/directors, etc., feel the need to 'glamourize' evil at all?

[/quote]

Realism. Like I said, evil is seductive. If evil was always gross, grim and repulsive, no one would turn to sin. Now, overglorifying evil isn't right, but portraying it as the attractive thing that it is, as long as it's still made clear that they're the evil ones? No harm done.

Evil is best played as “…beautiful …sexy, seductive.” If not, how would people be enticed toward what it actually is?

Evil is only capable of displaying love as a gilted gesture, it’s not solid or pure of heart.

Evil perverts the relationships it touches. The only love it knows is selfish and shallow.

youtube.com/user/EWTN

Fr. Anthony Mary was a homily today about the diverse difference between demonic inability and Divine ability.

Jesus,our Lords peace be whit You.
As long as You understand it is only fiction,and there is nothing against what the Church teaches,I would say,go ahead and like them,but don't follow in their path,remember,in TV or on the screen it is OK,in REAL life not.
Blessings,
Totterman

"There are very, VERY few people in the world who are truly, irredeemably evil."

I agree in principle that no one is evil or irredeemably evil.

However, there are hundreds of billions of people who choose to live attracted to evil and are awashed in the stains of evil.

You never met my ex girlfriend. :wink:

I think a veeery important part of this, that certain people tend to ignore, is that this is fiction. Fiction, and not a guide book on life.

One doesn’t like a villain because they think evil is amazing and they worship Satan.
No. People like the villains because they’re well written characters.
And when a character is well written, it doesn’t matter if they’re good or “evil”…

People don’t feel sympathy for the purely evil, big, ugly, monster type villain. Because this character is pure evil, with no redeeming qualities, and should be hated…

BUT LOOK, HERE COMES VILLAIN TYPE NUMBER TWO!
This villain is human. There’s a key element: Humanity.
And just like no person can be purely good, we cannot be purely evil either.

And with this type of villain, no matter how horrible they are, there’s a story behind it. That’s what you come to care about.

The character themselves. Not the sins they commit, but the character.

And I don’t know about you, but I do love a good tragic villain. I sympathize with them, I pity them.

Frankly, if fiction contained only black white it would not be all that interesting.
Villains are great. Either we love to hate them, or we love them despite what they do.
There’s nothing wrong with liking the villain, they’ve always been my favorite characters, and never once growing up did I see them as my role models, or some truly evil force trying to corrupt me. :rolleyes:

Just a bit of advice: Google “Moral Event Horizon.” if your villain has crossed it, it may be a bit twisted to root for him :slight_smile:

[quote="Pat_Payne, post:16, topic:215399"]
Just a bit of advice: Google "Moral Event Horizon." if your villain has crossed it, it may be a bit twisted to root for him :)

[/quote]

...you DO know the OP said she WASN'T rooting for him, yes? Just found them well written and interestingly developed?

[quote="shondrea, post:17, topic:215399"]
...you DO know the OP said she WASN'T rooting for him, yes? Just found them well written and interestingly developed?

[/quote]

I'll admit that "root for" was a bit ill-chosen, but the advice still stands -- the closer to the MEH, the more the audience wants to see the character killed with fire :)

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