Is it OK?

I’ve noticed that some priests keep the pointing finger and the thumb together, as in an “OK” sign, but not as round, when manipulating the vessels.

Why do some priests do this and why don’t all?

TIA

:blessyou:

[quote=Augustine]I’ve noticed that some priests keep the pointing finger and the thumb together, as in an “OK” sign, but not as round, when manipulating the vessels.

Why do some priests do this and why don’t all?

TIA

:blessyou:
[/quote]

Sure it’s OK, but not mandated. They do this because they hold the consecrated Host with those fingers.

Some priests even turn a key between their bent index and middle fingers for the same reason.

that is necessary in celebrating a TLM but not in NO mass.

[quote=AltarMan]They do this because they hold the consecrated Host with those fingers.
[/quote]

So is it a private devotion? I have the impression that the priests who do that give deeper, more spiritual homilies. Is that your impression too?

:blessyou:

[quote=Augustine]So is it a private devotion? I have the impression that the priests who do that give deeper, more spiritual homilies. Is that your impression too?

:blessyou:
[/quote]

There is also the symbolism that the 2 closed fingers represent the Human and Divine Natures of Christ, while the 3 free fingers represent the Father, Son and Holy Spirit.

In the TLM, after pronouncing the words of consecreation, the priest raises the Host for veneration and then places it on the corporal. After this, he doesn’t unjoin (disjoin?) his fingers and thumbs unless he’s holding the Host, until he washes his fingers at the ablutions following communion.I don’t know if there is anything similar to this dictated in the NO mass, but it would be my guess that that’s why you have seen this done.

[quote=Fidei Defensor]There is also the symbolism that the 2 closed fingers represent the Human and Divine Natures of Christ, while the 3 free fingers represent the Father, Son and Holy Spirit.
[/quote]

That is a very good point. In the Eastern Catholic Churches we cross ourselves using our index, middle finger and thumb (representing the Father, Son and Holy Spirit) and the two closed fingers the human and divine nature of Jesus Christ…

[quote=Augustine]So is it a private devotion? I have the impression that the priests who do that give deeper, more spiritual homilies. Is that your impression too?

:blessyou:
[/quote]

I’m not sure if this practice was ever directed by the Church for the celebration of the Tridentine Mass, but I do know the Holy See issued the following in 1967 which applies to both the normative Pauline Mass and the Tridentine Mass:

From: Tres Abhinc Annos: Second Instruction on the orderly carrying out of the Constitution on the Liturgy. Sacred Congregation of Rites, May 4, 1967:

“12. After the Consecration, the celebrant need not join thumb and forefinger; should any particle of the host have remained on his fingers, he rubs his fingers together over the paten.”

I would think some older priests were taught to do this in seminary and just continue and it’s really not a big deal one way or the other. Other priests have likely picked-up this practice by watching older priests and feel it is somehow “better” so they adopt it themselves.

Either way I would guess that less than 1 in 10 priests who do this are even aware of the existance of Tres Abhinc Annos: Second Instruction on the orderly carrying out of the Constitution on the Liturgy.

The conjoining of the fingers was required by the Tridentine rubrics and suppressed by the 1967 instruction that was already cited here.

[quote=Chatter163]The conjoining of the fingers was required by the Tridentine rubrics and suppressed by the 1967 instruction that was already cited here.
[/quote]

Absolutely fascinating. Threads like this and the one on evelvating the consecrated Host and the chalice show just how widespread confusion is with respect to the Mass – be it the TLM or the normative AVM (Ancient Vernacular Mass.)

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