Is it sinful to confess things you're not sure you did/are sinful?


#1

Hello everyone,

I tried posting this before but it didn’t seem to go through. Sorry if there is a double post.

I’ll be making my very first confession this Saturday. Being a very scrupulous person, I am now in the process of re-writing my 20 page sin list for the second time to make sure that I get everything right, and that everything is organized and readable.

There is a huge temptation to put things that I’m not sure I did or things I am not sure are sinful JUST IN CASE.

Now I am wondering if this in itself is a sin. Is it?

Please, please, please help! I am feeling so overwhelmed. :frowning:


#2

[quote=Hermione]Hello everyone,

I tried posting this before but it didn’t seem to go through. Sorry if there is a double post.

I’ll be making my very first confession this Saturday. Being a very scrupulous person, I am now in the process of re-writing my 20 page sin list for the second time to make sure that I get everything right, and that everything is organized and readable.

There is a huge temptation to put things that I’m not sure I did or things I am not sure are sinful JUST IN CASE.

Now I am wondering if this in itself is a sin. Is it?

Please, please, please help! I am feeling so overwhelmed. :frowning:
[/quote]

Dont worry,
First of all you dont need to go in with 20 pages (were you just joking?). Just focus on the big things, the little ones are “excess baggage”. The important thing to do is to focus on the serious sins and confess those, the rest are forgiven without having to go into each one. God knows your heart and the Priest knows what a delicate position first timers are in. They are there to comfort and will make it go by smooth. Do your best, that is all that is asked. Dont get trapped in “just in case” situations, if you feel/know it is a mortal sin then confess, if you dont feel it is then dont mention it. If you do list it all it is no sin.

Just open up and let God heal you, you will be fine.


#3

Very good advice. Catholic dude hooked you up right off the top. God bless you!
Pax vobiscum, :thumbsup:


#4

[quote=Hermione]Hello everyone,

I tried posting this before but it didn’t seem to go through. Sorry if there is a double post.

I’ll be making my very first confession this Saturday. Being a very scrupulous person, I am now in the process of re-writing my 20 page sin list for the second time to make sure that I get everything right, and that everything is organized and readable.

There is a huge temptation to put things that I’m not sure I did or things I am not sure are sinful JUST IN CASE.

Now I am wondering if this in itself is a sin. Is it?

Please, please, please help! I am feeling so overwhelmed. :frowning:
[/quote]

From americancatholic.org/Messenger/Jan2004/Wiseman.asp

Q: I’m having a difference of opinion with a friend who says that scrupulosity is a sin. I say it is not. What does the Catholic Church teach on this?

A: Genuine scrupulosity is not a free choice like preferring Snickers candy over Skittles. Scrupulosity is influenced by many factors beyond a person’s complete control. Although atheists can be scrupulous, we tend to describe their situation as seeking an impossible certainty or perfection.

We associate scrupulosity with a religious motivation, probably linked to a person’s mental image of God. If that is the case, there is some possibility of change once the individual realizes that no single mental image can represent God completely.

Someone whose scrupulosity is religiously related should seek the help necessary so that he or she can enjoy the inner freedom that flows from being made in God’s image and likeness (see Genesis 1:26).

We certainly need to reflect upon our decisions. Scrupulosity, however, is a continual agitation that maybe I could have made a better choice or perhaps God is angry with me over something that, in fact, a reasonable person would regard as not that important.

Under the heading “Scrupulosity” in the New Catholic Encyclopedia, Cyril James Harney, O.P., writes: "Deriving from the Latin scrupus, whose diminutive form scrupulus means a small sharp stone, scrupulosity signifies habitual and unreasonable hesitation, doubt, coupled with anxiety of mind, in connection with the making of moral judgments.

“The scrupulous person’s life journey has been aptly likened to that of a traveler whose pebble-filled shoes make every step painful and hesitant. Scruples render one incapable of making with finality the daily decisions of life.”

All the time and energy claimed by scrupulosity should be available for generously cooperating with God’s grace in a person’s life.

Basically get the list done to the best of your recollection of things you KNEW were a sin, the rest don’t worry about it. Once you are absolved, you are absolved. You will have a clean slate so to speak so go and sin no more.

absolved əbzɑ:lvd, æbzɑ:lvd]
A adjective
1 absolved, clear, cleared, exculpated, exonerated, vindicated

freed from any question of guilt; “is absolved from all blame”; “was now clear of the charge of cowardice”; “his official honor is vindicated”


#5

And be sure to destroy the list of sins you made after you’re done with it :slight_smile:


#6

God love you Hermione, and for heaven’s sake-

CHILL OUT! :slight_smile:

Read this thread too! forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=45308


#7

I find it best to ask the priest. That’s what he’s there for. Say “Is it a sin to…?” If he says yes, then add it to your list. If not, you’re off the hook and don’t need to wonder anymore.


#8

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.