Is Klezmer music popular in Israel?


#1

I am hoping someone in Israel can answer my question. Is Klezmer music popular with Jewish people from all branches of Judaism or is it more popular with Orthodox Jews? Do non-Jewish people living in Israel enjoy Klezmer music? In what kind of social settings is it found?
:wave:


#2

Hi Blanka!

You posted:

I am hoping someone in Israel can answer my question.

That would be me! :slight_smile:

Is Klezmer music popular with Jewish people from all branches of Judaism or is it more popular with Orthodox Jews?

It is definitely more popular with Orthodox Jews, with Orthodox Ashkenazi Jews in particular (since it comes from Ashkenazi traditions), as opposed to Orthodox Sephardi Jews (see jewfaq.org/ashkseph.htm & en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klezmer),

I hear it mainly at religious weddings (we’re going to one Monday night; I’ll keep you posted). We’ve been to a few weddings in which bride & groom were both non-religious (the cremony was orthodox, but the music & dancing were decidedly secular) & I don’t think that any klezmer was played at those. Sephardi Jews have their own musical traditions.

Do non-Jewish people living in Israel enjoy Klezmer music?

I kinda doubt it. I’ll ask the Druze gentleman at my office if Israeli Druze ever listen to it but I’m pretty sure that his answer wil be no.

In what kind of social settings is it found?

Mainly weddings, bar-mitzvahs, etc. You can buy klezmer CDs or go to certain clubs to hear it. There’s a big annual klezmer festival in the upper Galilee city of Safed (safed.co.il). This year’s festival is from August 15-22 (safedfound.org.il/cont.asp?id=30407).

Howzat?

Be well!

ssv :wave:


#3

My first taste of klezmer was on Prairie Home Companion a number of years ago–they had a klezmer band on. I liked them, especially because the vocalist explained the Yiddish lyrics before the song was played. Oddly enough, one of their instrumentalists was a full Norwegian.

Famous klezmer classic–“Bei mir bist to schoen,” covered by Benny Goodman in the '30s.

I still like it, but in small doses. The note-bending clarinet gets old in a hurry!

DaveBj


#4

[quote=DaveBj] Famous klezmer classic–“Bei mir bist to schoen,” covered by Benny Goodman in the '30s.

[/quote]

One of the most famous klezmer and swing musicians is ZIGGY ELMAN who recorded the wildly popular “AND THE ANGELS SING” with ends with a wild clarinet rift klezmer style!:dancing:

Many of the songs of the Swing & Big Band era were influenced by klezmer tunes that their writers heard as they grew up…:yup:


#5

[quote=Patchunky]One of the most famous klezmer and swing musicians is ZIGGY ELMAN who recorded the wildly popular “AND THE ANGELS SING” with ends with a wild clarinet rift klezmer style!:dancing:

Many of the songs of the Swing & Big Band era were influenced by klezmer tunes that their writers heard as they grew up…:yup:
[/quote]

I’ve heard that cut–it’s a great arrangement.

The first music I heard on the radio in the late '40s was Big Band and Swing. I’m still there :thumbsup: That’s probably why I like my klezmer a little tamer than most of it actually is.

DaveBj


#6

I like Klezmer but I really like the Sephardic music of the Renaissance more. Great stuff that!


#7

I really appreciate all of the responses and insights.

I recently bought a Klezmer Christmas CD (I know…that sounds like a contradiction… :smiley: ) and I LOVE the music.

Who/What CD would any of you suggest for good traditional Klezmer music?
What about Sephardic music that brotherhrolf mentioned?

:wave:


#8

amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B000005E7H/qid=1122239935/sr=1-20/ref=sr_1_20/102-1437321-1561742?v=glance&s=classical

If the link worked, it will take you to Amazon and to an album which shows the Jewish roots of Catholic music. This particular piece is interwoven Gregorian chant and Jewish chant. Whereas Klezmer music is Eastern European in origin, Sephardic music exemplifies the connections between Moorish, Jewish, and Christian culture.


#9

Let’s see if I can do this without posting personal information.

Ok at Amazon there is an album called the Sacred Bridge - listen to track 3.

amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B000005E7H/qid=1122241368/sr=1-20/ref=sr_1_20/102-1437321-1561742?v=glance&s=classical


#10

OK the link works. Gregorian chant and eastern Jewish chant seamlessly interwoven. When you listen to Sephardic music it is the interweaving of middle-eastern themes, Catholic, and Jewish as well.


#11

When I was living in Grand Rapids, Michigan, I used to listen to a radio show named “Hatikvah”, after the Israeli national anthem—but the show was 90% klezmer.

I like it; granted, I’m a shaygets, but I like various styles. Klezmer, for me, has a sort of medieval flavor to it that I can’t quite explain.

I remember one guy they used to play on the show was named Benny Bell; he had a parody of the old Yiddish standard “Rumania” that was hilarious. All I can remember is:

"Ah Rumania, Rumania, Rumania Rumania!
I used to live there before I moved to Pennsylvania.
Ah Rumania, Rumania, Rumania Rumania!
It was so beautiful there I could hardly explain ya!

In Rumania at a show, I met the sweetest girl I know
We would have married long ago—but my wife said “No, no, no”,
Hi-digga-dig-dum, digga-digga-dig-dum,
Hi-digga-dig-dum, digga-digga-doh!"

And remember: “Az me shloft mit hint, shtayt men oif mit flai.” (One of the few Yiddish proverbs I can remember.) :slight_smile:


#12

Haha… this is an AWESOME thread. I love it! :slight_smile:


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