Is listening to certain music bad?


#1

is listening to emo music bad? Like emo rock and emo core. Is this against God in anyway?


#2

Could you give examples of what kinds of bands you are referring to?

For example, Panic! At the Disco is classified of as punk/emo rock. A song like “Always” would be fine, but a song like “Build God, Then We’ll Talk” would be sinful to listen to (in my view). I don’t think it is really the music genre that is sinful (in some cases), but what songs/lyrics/meanings you are listening to.

Hope this helps!


#3

Is listening to certain music bad? Most definitely!

I wasn’t sure what EMO was, so I looked it up. One person talking about it said that it talks a lot about suicide and has lyrics where people feel sorry for themselves.

Why not listen, instead, to something that isn’t questionable, that is good, outright?


#4

Society has not trained us to like classical music or church music. Our friends like things that aren’t good for us, and it’s difficult to avoid.


#5

I listen to all kinds of music, although not the biggest jazz and opera fan at times… Every song has a depth of experience of the person who wrote it, and there is often a very good reason some music talks about stuff that people consider “bad”. People write and sing about their own experiences in life. Most of the time, it seems to me, it’s just cathartic.

I try to listen to music that’s opposite what i feel… not always depressing lonely stuff, when I’m feeling depressed and lonely, although sometimes that helps me work though my feelings that way, also.

Moderation is key. I use music like DBT (Dialectical behavior therapy) because I grew up with a lot of abuse, and I can get stuck really easily in my feelings and memories, flashbacks and stuff, that can be really hard to pull myself out of, without a little help :wink:


#6

Generally speaking, avoid music that is not uplifting or loud and angry.

Music that is beautiful and uplifting, even calming, is what everyone in general should be listening to.

Peace,
Ed


#7

What about “I write sins not tragedies?” :blush:


#8

I disagree somewhat. Music has to be beautiful or we would not willingly listen, no? And not all music has to be uplifting, music is by nature designed to excite many moods in us, just like watching a film or reading a book can. Dies Irae is about as angry as you can get, and yet the Church saw fit to include this in her funeral liturgy (until recently).

I think that everything we do should satisfy at least one of two criteria. Does it glorify God, and does it contribute to my personal holiness, and lead me to Heaven? If we say no to both then we need to cut that thing out of our life and drop it like a bad habit, because it is one. Now, I like some questionable things: watching horrible TV, playing Warcraft III, Magic: the Gathering. I cannot justify some of this stuff by those criteria. But at least the latter, where I go visit my friends to play cards and discuss Catholic things, are certainly doing both glorifying God and making mer personally holy through Christian fellowship. It’s not the activity itself, just that it brings us together to meet and talk once a week. It gets me out of the house and out of my parish, and that strengthens my personal character. So while Magic isn’t the best game for a Christian to play, and Starbucks isn’t the best place for a KofC to hang out, I grit my teeth and I do it for my friends.

It’s harder and harder for me to justify consumption of secular media. When I was young I listened to Goth and Industrial music. I liked some horrible stuff, including a guy named Foetus sing about the “Only Good Christian Is Dead”, and the Swans said “Public Castration is a Good Idea.” I was in a hateful period of life, and the more rebellious I could be through my eclectic tastes, the better. Little did I suspect that I offended God in all of these things. When I look back at those days, to play a little Siouxsie or Swans, and I pay attention to the lyrics, I realize just how far I had fallen from the man my parents wanted to raise. And I am glad I was called back from the precipice by the only voice I could hear, that of Jesus Christ.

[BIBLEDRB]1 Thessalonians 5:14-22[/BIBLEDRB]


#9

That’s a pretty arrogant statement, Ed, given that ~Every~ song is a Gift from God. Life isn’t all rainbows and ponies, nor is it meant to be. How do people learn the difference between Good and Evil, with out experiencing it a bit, for themselves?


#10

I looked up the lyrics, and it’s swearing a lot! Oh.

I think one would need to go to confession after that one for taking the Lord’s name in vain!


#11

Hey Ed,

Revelation 3:15-17

New International Version (NIV)

15 I know your deeds, that you are neither cold nor hot. I wish you were either one or the other! 16 So, because you are lukewarm—neither hot nor cold—I am about to spit you out of my mouth. 17 You say, ‘I am rich; I have acquired wealth and do not need a thing.’ But you do not realize that you are wretched, pitiful, poor, blind and naked.


#12

My advise for this thread: if you don’t want your six-year-old to be listening to it, then you shouldn’t either. There is a theory that what you listen to will affect your soul and it can affect your relationship with God. I believe this is true and by listening to cleaner music, it helps somehow.

Listening to clean music should be a general rule for all Christians for example some of the old music from the 1940’s, 50’s, 60’s, some musicals from that period as well as today are generally clean. Classical, taize, hymns, are always timeless. Some country music is very clean and often has a christian lean. Some contemporary groups such as U2, are secular but their music is also Christian based.

Christian music is another alternative as well because it is offered in many genres such as Christian rock, rap, hip pop etc. Some artists are also sometimes classified as worship or inspirational. What I love about Christian music is that it is clean and it only speaks about God. There are also Catholic artists as well whose music would fall under Christian or Catholic depending on the song. Some songs are timeless and spans all denominations while others are more specific to the Catholic denomination.

I listen to Christian music a lot therefore if you want me to recommend some artists, please send me a line.


#13

I agree with the first part, there’s a Lot of songs I wouldn’t let my littles one listen to when she was a child, but now she’s old enough to understand a lot of differences that she couldn’t when she was little.

I love Christian music too, but telling a adult they shouldn’t listen to songs that can fill them with love and joy, just because they aren’t Christian, is denying a part of the life our Father is trying to share with us.


#14

My advice would be to ask a priest. If you ask for opinions about what is sinful and what is not, you’ll get as many different answers as people who respond. A priest can give you an objective answer. If you base criteria of sin of feelings, you risk becoming scrupulous.


#15

Good question. I wonder the same thing sometimes. If I really like a song, I look up the lyrics or meaning, just to get an idea of what the musicians are trying to say. If I don’t like the message, it disconnects me from the song anyway. Music is very personal. More than likely, you’re listening to something emotional when it fits your mood. I have fast, loud songs that I listen to when I’m hyper or angry. I have sad songs that I listen to when I feel sad. Nothing wrong with that, as long as you pull away if they bring you down too much.

Cursing in songs is tricky. It can be hard to buy bleeped versions of your favorite songs, but if you buy from iTunes, they are good about labeling the song with “explicit” if there are curse words or strong adult themes. They can be a good source of a bleeped version of the song.

I would avoid songs that talk about violence, especially violence to women or the police, and songs that make you too emotional. The good news is that songs only hold your attention for a relatively short amount of time before you get tired of them. If you start to listen to something that is violent or depressing routinely, especially if you feel depressed or angry afterwards, then I would get rid of it.

I hope that helps.


#16

Any P!ATD fan has listened to that song at least once, and, as it is annoyingly catchy, I would definitely not listen to it! Aside from the fact that it is a song about adultery, it takes God’s name in vain. If you really love that song for the music, you could always try finding and instrumental version! I found a instrumental version of “There’s a Reason These Tables Are Numbered Honey” so I am guessing there might be others as well. :slight_smile:


#17

You should probably avoid Viking folk metal which sometimes has songs about heathens killing Christians. I dabbled in the Nordic religion for some time in my youth, paganism was very interested to me for a while.

On the other hand you could take this with a pinch of salt and think about it this way: There music is like art, depicting history, you know like painting a scene of some Viking battle or something. I don’t know! I’m chatting rubbish but that’s one way of looking at it I suppose, it’s just music.


#18

I was involved in the local Punk Rock scene in the late 1970s. I could not believe the lyrics by Iggy Pop, but the atmosphere of ‘the scene’ was electric, and I was partly affected. But God held me back. I didn’t go to the parties, do the drugs and kept the booze to a minimum. That lifestyle/scene ended when a friend led me to a Christian coffee house where God gently pointed out the error of my ways.

The people who wanted the thrill of ‘living on the edge’ were on dangerous ground. In a few cases, their lives changed after the euphoria was over. I lost contact with them. I pray they are OK.

I thank God for putting my feet on the right path, though I still stumble from time to time.

Peace,
Ed


#19

One of my Favorite songs to listen to, with God in mind, is According To You, by Orianthi

Look at some of the Lyrics this way:
According to you
I’m stupid,
I’m useless,
I can’t do anything right.
According to you
I’m difficult,
hard to please,
forever changing my mind.
I’m a mess in a dress,
can’t show up on time,
even if it would save my life.
According to you. According to you.

But according to him
I’m beautiful,
incredible,
he can’t get me out of his head.
According to him
I’m funny,
irresistible,
everything he ever wanted.
Everything is opposite,
I don’t feel like stopping it,
so baby tell me what I got to lose.
He’s into me for everything I’m not,
according to you.

She might be talking about a boyfriend, but replace “him” with the idea of Him, instead, and it makes it a very different, and much larger, story =)

Another song I like to listen to, when I’m feeling… moody, angry, bitter, and blaming other people for my troubles… keeping in mind the idea God is singing it ~at~ me, is
The Sound of Madness, by Shinedown

Yeah, I get it,
You’re an outcast.
Always under attack.
Always coming in last,
Bringing up the past.
No one owes you anything.

I created the Sound of Madness.
Wrote the book on pain.
Somehow I’m still here,
To explain

When I see modern music in lights such as these, I have a very hard time understanding why people could think there is such a thing as “bad” music… rather than just bad attitudes. God works in mysterious ways, and moves each of us, whether we accept him, or not.

Kyrie Eleison,

~V~


#20

Hi macelonel,

Jesus says “By their fruit you will know them”. You basically need to find out what the “fruit” of this music is. As in, how does this music affect you? Does it bring you closer to God? If the answer is yes, then continue. If the answer is no, then stop and avoid the temptation to listen to it.

I hope that helps!


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