Is "living to die" really that bad?


#1

According to my mother, I’m “living to die”, lately.

I see nothing wrong with that, though. Why? Because this life is temporary and eternal life is permanent. I simply do not want to get too attached to non-permanent earthly things and want to live a life dedicated to others and God, spreading the word of God, getting as close to God as possible, and securing the salvation of others, as well as my own. If I have fun or find happiness along the way, great, but if not, it’s not a problem, because I find earthly fun and happiness to largely be a distraction and a waste of what little time we have.

What do you think of this philosophy?


#2

It’s how the saints lived, if that tells you anything!

For people who are very wrapped up in this world, it is hard to fathom why someone would live their earthly life with their eyes turned Heavenward - but you’re right, this life is fleeting and we need to store up our treasures in Heaven with God, not down here on earth.


#3

I think it's impossible to tell without both sides of the story. In theory, it's great to give up earthly distractions, but it's really important to continue to engage the world as we do so.

I think it's a good idea to prayerfully consider what others are telling us. Sometimes when others make remarks like these they are doing so because they are afraid to make the same sacrifices we have made. Other times, we may actually be on the wrong path but they may lack the words to articulate it to us in a way that we can understand.

Whatever course of action transforms you in love is certainly the right one. I for one was very surprised when my conversion to Catholicism led me to become less ascetic and more engaged in the world.


#4

[quote="JChapel, post:1, topic:224677"]
According to my mother, I'm "living to die", lately.

I see nothing wrong with that, though. Why? Because this life is temporary and eternal life is permanent. I simply do not want to get too attached to non-permanent earthly things and want to live a life dedicated to others and God, spreading the word of God, getting as close to God as possible, and securing the salvation of others, as well as my own. If I have fun or find happiness along the way, great, but if not, it's not a problem, because I find earthly fun and happiness to largely be a distraction and a waste of what little time we have.

What do you think of this philosophy?

[/quote]

Honest opinion-I think it's absurd, and it gives Catholics a bad name.

I want to get to heaven too-but I value this life because it gets us ready for the next. I enjoy my time with my dogs, my family, my friends, everything. I go out of my way to be happy-even when I'm not feeling it. Why? Because happy people bring more converts along the way than someone who just "lives to die".

God gave you this life as a gift. It's insulting to Him to act this way.


#5

The way you described it sounds just fine. On the flip side, I’ve heard people use heaven as an excuse not to care about anything other than God: family, friends, community, etc. We must take full advantage of our time here on earth and not squander our gifts!

Many of my fellow Catholics like to say how horrible the world is compared to heaven. But if you open up your eyes, it’s beautiful! God made it, put us on it, and created a beautiful place for us to hang our hat before we jump on board for a trip to our final destination. :slight_smile:


#6

i think its a fine philosophy…and this is what St, Paul thinks of it in his letter to the Philippians, Chapter 1…

from Douay Rheims…

[21] For to me, to live is Christ; and to die is gain. [22] And if to live in the flesh, this is to me the fruit of labour, and what I shall choose I know not. [23] But I am straitened between two: having a desire to be dissolved and to be with Christ, a thing by far the better. [24] But to abide still in the flesh, is needful for you. [25] And having this confidence, I know that I shall abide, and continue with you all, for your furtherance and joy of faith:

*[22] “This is to me”… His meaning is, that although his dying immediately for Christ would be his gain, by putting him presently in possession of heaven; yet he is doubtful what he should choose, because by staying longer in the flesh, he should be more beneficial to the souls of his neighbours. *

God Bless


#7

While it’s true that you only do have one life, centering how you righteously you live that life around just a reward-motive for heaven does not speak of a mature sense of morality. Much atrocity had been done and ignorance perpetuated in the name of ‘saving souls’.


#8

I don’t know you personally, but will just say a little in response to what you have written above.

As long as you are joyful living for the Lord, and are not obnoxious about where others are in the Lord, it sounds fine.

Our Lord does tell us to live in the world, but not to be of the world.

P.S. - It is possible you may have a religious vocation.
It is also possible that you have a vocation to be married to someone who has the same
desires you have.


#9

[quote="Lost_Wanderer, post:7, topic:224677"]
While it's true that you only do have one life, centering how you righteously you live that life around just a reward-motive for heaven does not speak of a mature sense of morality. Much atrocity had been done and ignorance perpetuated in the name of 'saving souls'.

[/quote]

We don't know that the OP is just living for a "reward-motive". What is described in the original message sounds like an attitude of spiritual maturity, All Christians should strive to see their purpose in that understanding, which brings much peace and joy.

You say "much atrocity had been done and ignorance perpetuated in the name of 'saving souls.' "

Any atrocity and ignorance spread in the name of saving souls was done by those who were not truly following Christ.


#10

[quote="Dorothy, post:9, topic:224677"]
We don't know that the OP is just living for a "reward-motive". What is described in the original message sounds like an attitude of spiritual maturity, All Christians should strive to see their purpose in that understanding, which brings much peace and joy.

[/quote]

Actually, anyone who looks down on the world and dreams only of eternal salvation and being in the presence of the Almighty Father is pretty much somebody who has a reward motive.

[quote="Dorothy, post:9, topic:224677"]
You say "much atrocity had been done and ignorance perpetuated in the name of 'saving souls.' "

Any atrocity and ignorance spread in the name of saving souls was done by those who were not truly following Christ.

[/quote]

Sorry but that's just a True Scotsman fallacy.


#11

To clarify: I'm still open to the experience of life, and turning my focus towards others, I just don't want to become too attached to our world's culture, and want to remain (besides food on the table and a roof over my head) largely independent of material goods. I want to direct all of my energy towards helping others come closer to the faith in general, rather than rallying for some earthly cause, because I see earthly corruption as inevitable and causes temporary, where in comparison the decisions we make regarding our salvation last forever.

Finally, I am not someone with a reward motive. If I end up suffering the ravages of hell for my earthly actions, yet save countless more in the process, at least I can rest knowing that I did some good with my life.


#12

Well that’s cleared things up a bit. Still, I’m more along the lines of those who live by Pascal’s wager. Heaven and hell are not sufficient reasons for morality. As I’ve said before, it appeals only to those still in the premature, pre-conventional stages of moral development. This is not to say that neither heaven or hell exists but to simply say they are not sufficient motives for doing what’s right. I would rather choose to do the right thing (and perhaps even tell others that they’ve crossed lines), not out of fear of heaven or hell but because I know it’s the right thing.


#13

[quote="JChapel, post:11, topic:224677"]
To clarify: I'm still open to the experience of life, and turning my focus towards others, I just don't want to become too attached to our world's culture, and want to remain (besides food on the table and a roof over my head) largely independent of material goods. I want to direct all of my energy towards helping others come closer to the faith in general, rather than rallying for some earthly cause, because I see earthly corruption as inevitable and causes temporary, where in comparison the decisions we make regarding our salvation last forever.

Finally, I am not someone with a reward motive. If I end up suffering the ravages of hell for my earthly actions, yet save countless more in the process, at least I can rest knowing that I did some good with my life.

[/quote]

a comforting link for us all..thank-you St Cyprian of Carthage..this is so true

ewtn.com/faith/teachings/deathb1.htm


#14

Have you looked into the monastic life or a vocation where you could both be a contemplative
yet serve as a teacher or writer? Retreat master, maybe?


#15

Surprisingly, no. While I’m nowhere near charismatic enough to become a full-time priest, I could definitely see myself called to some sort of religious vocation.


#16

Priest - charismatic??? Huh??? Am I in the wrong forum???:shrug:

Most priests aren’t charismatic in the least.

:slight_smile:


#17

Well, what about standing in front of large crowds and reciting long homilies? Certainly some charisma might help there.


#18

The Holy Spirit could certainly help there,
if that’s what you’re called to do is give homilies
of a decent length.

:slight_smile:


#19

It’s more a case of either being able to speak to parishioner’s hearts, in a sincere way, OR, a good extemporaneous speaker. The latter type of priest is at risk for doing very long homilies that extend the Mass and make parishioners angry. A homily is NOT the focus of the Mass, it’s the Eucharist that should be the “main event.” Our priest seems to forget that…his homilies can go into 40 minutes. His Masses are routinely 90 min. :confused:

So you can read your homily, in a sincere manner, or talk to your parishioners, but not be a showman. Or you can really love the spotlight and not be able to edit yourself, and go on too long and be in love with the sound of your voice.

I really don’t think personal charisma enters into it at all. In fact, charisma from a priest would give me the creeps.


#20

Living to “die” is a misnomer if by death you intend to get to heaven.


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