Is smoking marijuana a sin?


#1

Do you believe that smoking marijuana (for non-medical reasons) is a sin? I ask because a recent thread that asks this question seems to have a lot of people who don’t believe it is a sin. Frankly, this surprises me, so I wanted to take a poll. VOTE!


#2

I think that smoking marijuana in and of itself is a sin on a par with smoking tobacco.

If you happen to live in an area where doing so is illegal, then other sinful aspects may apply to the act.


#3

[quote=Digitonomy]I think that smoking marijuana in and of itself is a sin on a par with smoking tobacco.

If you happen to live in an area where doing so is illegal, then other sinful aspects may apply to the act.
[/quote]

Yes, weather you breathe it in or take drugs that can potentially harm you in any way, shape, or form, you are indeed defiling your body which is to be a temple of the Lord.


#4

I do believe that smoking marijuana is a sin. We are not to harm our bodies, because the Holy Spirit lives in us. Whenever you smoke marijuana, you lose brain cells and do all sorts of damage. When you smoke cigarettes, you take times off of your lifespan and increase the odds of developing cancer.


#5

[quote=littleitaly]Yes, weather you breathe it in or take drugs that can potentially harm you in any way, shape, or form, you are indeed defiling your body which is to be a temple of the Lord.
[/quote]

I dont understand, perhaps you dont mean EVERYTHING that can harm you in any way shape or form. By this definition, alcohol would be included. It kills brain cells, damages the liver and so on and so forth. How about any pharmaceuticals (I spell that right?)? Everything you buy has side-effects only some are more severe than others? How about radiation therapy?

I dont mean to sound cynical or anything, but perhaps you could clarify? Perhaps any “drug” used specifically for its effects then? This would “allow” alcohol (everyone drank in the Bible) but not for the sole purpose of getting wasted. But then tobacco and marijuana could be argued for in the same fashion…drnit

BTW:I dont smoke anything and the worst thing I drink is Red Bull.


#6

Ask your self do you smoke to get high, to excape, to cope, to avoid reality…sounds like it’s wrong, the same can be said for alcohol, the difference between alcoholic drinks is they can be good for you in moderation, dope isn’t.


#7

I think that disobedience to civil law makes it a sin. If anything is used in excess it becomes a sin. However, from the “damaging the temple” standpoint, sitting at a crowded intersection breathing exhaust is probably equally damaging as a moderate consumption. And it would take an awful lot to make you lose control. alcohol is by far worse and it’s legal. (?)


#8

[quote=Argh]I dont understand, perhaps you dont mean EVERYTHING that can harm you in any way shape or form. By this definition, alcohol would be included. It kills brain cells, damages the liver and so on and so forth. How about any pharmaceuticals (I spell that right?)? Everything you buy has side-effects only some are more severe than others? How about radiation therapy?

I dont mean to sound cynical or anything, but perhaps you could clarify? Perhaps any “drug” used specifically for its effects then? This would “allow” alcohol (everyone drank in the Bible) but not for the sole purpose of getting wasted. But then tobacco and marijuana could be argued for in the same fashion…drnit

BTW:I dont smoke anything and the worst thing I drink is Red Bull.
[/quote]

Nothing cynical when wanting to know someones meaning. Yes, it does include alcohol. As St paul had mentioned to the Corinthians in 1 Cor 6, 10.( I suggest to read chapter 6 in its entirety to get a better understanding of what St Paul states). As far as prescription medications stand in this issue, well the Holy Spirit has given man the knowledge to create such medication that will help those who are ill to become better. Therefore excluding the proper medicine when used properly. To help clearafy one other issue, would be the word drunkards in Corinthians. There will always be disagreement on my statement but here it goes; When a person does drugs of any kind to pleasure themselves it will put them in a state of drunkness. Hope I helped to clearafy my previous statement. God bless and Peace


#9

I cant give the number of the passage, but didnt Jesus turn water to wine for a wedding party? He also uses vineyards in his parables…

I can easily see excessive drinking. I live in Madison where the favorite extracurriclar activity is to get as drunk as possible and wake up in someone elses bed.

I guess it’s all about intent once more…


#10

smoking marijuana
Question from Lynn Sheer on 05-29-2001:
At a conference I heard that smoking marijuana was a mortal sin. On talking to my priest about this issue, he said it was ok to smoke 1 or 2 marijuana cigarettes a day and it was not a sin. Answer by Fr.Stephen F. Torraco on 05-29-2001: I cannot understand how any priest could possibly tell you such a thing. Paragraph 2291 of the Catechism of the Catholic Church states quite clearly that the use of drugs is a serious evil. Add to this the fact that the use marijuana is a violation of the civil law, and the civil law, in this case in harmony with the natural law, is binding on the conscience.


#11

The following texts of the Catechism address the issue of illegal and illicit drug use: 2291 The use of drugs inflicts very grave damage on human health and life. Their use, except on strictly therapeutic grounds, is a grave offense. Clandestine production of and trafficking in drugs are scandalous practices. They constitute direct co-operation in evil, since they encourage people to practices gravely contrary to the moral law.


#12

in the case of CCC 2291, it is a broad area to say “drugs” because if you are going to place marijuana in that category, you could also put a cigarrette and morning coffee in there too. If pot was legal, I dont believe it would fall in the mortal sin category if used like the beer durind the football game.


#13

I truly believe, based on unfortunate first hand observations, that purposely distorting your consciousness with any illegal or legal substance (without a seriously good medical reason) is a mortal sin.

And if an indiginous people believe that getting buzzed is part of their religious process, I believe that it is as wrong as suteism or human sacrifice.


#14

[quote=1samuel]in the case of CCC 2291, it is a broad area to say “drugs” because if you are going to place marijuana in that category, you could also put a cigarrette and morning coffee in there too. If pot was legal, I dont believe it would fall in the mortal sin category if used like the beer durind the football game.
[/quote]

Why would an illegal substance like marijuana not be in that category? It is against the civil law and this is a sin.


#15

[quote=Kevin Walker]I truly believe, based on unfortunate first hand observations, that purposely distorting your consciousness with any illegal or legal substance (without a seriously good medical reason) is a mortal sin.

And if an indiginous people believe that getting buzzed is part of their religious process, I believe that it is as wrong as suteism or human sacrifice.
[/quote]

Why are some so quick to dismiss obeying the civil law? Are we now our own authorities?


#16

[quote=1samuel]in the case of CCC 2291, it is a broad area to say “drugs” because if you are going to place marijuana in that category, you could also put a cigarrette and morning coffee in there too. If pot was legal, I dont believe it would fall in the mortal sin category if used like the beer durind the football game.
[/quote]

Cigarettes and beer are legal.


#17

[quote=fix]Cigarettes and beer are legal.
[/quote]

Cigarettes and beer are not drugs, getting drunk on purpose is vile, and smoking cigarettes is simply stupid and vile.

And with all the recent examples of wrongful incarceration in this country, being your own authority is a necessity (its now becoming a necessity to protect your children from the law; forced busing or public schools as examples).

Obeying the civil law? Would it be O.K. for someone’s daughter to work as a prostitute in Nevada simply because it is legal in 13 out of 17 counties? Or someone’s daughter working in porn films in California because it is legal there? Or approving of absurd homosexual marriages or abortions simply because they’re legal? Even the civil law has its limits!


#18

[quote=Kevin Walker]Cigarettes and beer are not drugs, getting drunk on purpose is vile, and smoking cigarettes is simply stupid and vile.

And with all the recent examples of wrongful incarceration in this country, being your own authority is a necessity (its now becoming a necessity to protect your children from the law; forced busing or public schools as examples).

Obeying the civil law? Would it be O.K. for someone’s daughter to work as a prostitute in Nevada simply because it is legal in 13 out of 17 counties? Or someone’s daughter working in porn films in California because it is legal there? Even the civil law has its limits!
[/quote]

In the case of marijuana, the civil law does not contradict the natural law, thus it must be obeyed.

We must obey the civil law, unless it is unjust.


#19

[quote=fix]In the case of marijuana, the civil law does not contradict the natural law, thus it must be obeyed.
[/quote]

Thanks. You got me on this one. Could you give me an example where natural law is not superceded by civil law?

Anti-forced busing activist Ray Flynn gave this same pitch in 1974 to evil federal judge Arthur W. Garrity arguing against a parent’s natural rights to guard their children, and Flynn’s argument lost in a court of law.

For the past 31 years of failed forced busing in Boston, natural law has been superceded by civil law (and again in Massachusetts with court ordered homosexual marriages).

We have been pulling our hair out by the roots over this civil law/natural law issue for a whole generation here in Boston!

The homosexuals of perverted N.A.M.B.L.A. claim to have a natural law to go after little boys and are seeking civil law to do it! Responsible Americans must reconsider the efficacy of the law!


#20

[quote=Kevin Walker]Thanks. You got me on this one. Could you give me an example where natural law is not superceded by civil law?
[/quote]

Laws against pot do not violate the natural law. Abortion, violates the natural law, yet is legal. That law is unjust and not binding.

The Church teaches all civil laws bind us, unless they are unjust.


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