Is Space Exploration Worth the Cost?


#1

Is Space Exploration Worth the Cost?

How do you feel about the idea of tax money going to space programs?

Do we really need one.

What do you think?

Here is a link to give you some perspective.


#2

We should have unmanned space probes. Manned spaceflight is much more problematic. The ISS has been a huge expense with very little benefit. Talk about Moon bases and trips to Mars is just too much.


#3

Space exploration is the only way we’re going to reach a point where resources are no longer a major issue. I think it is important, but think private companies (space X) are going to be a better option than the government, as they are actually concerned about how they use their money >_>


#4

IMO it’s a waste of money. Should be cleaning up the ocean with that cash.


#5

Space technology, in general, has generated huge benefits. True of US/USSR race, true of almost any technology. ISS, for example has allowed improvements by understanding things in near weightless conditions. Improved eye surgery. Improved treatment of bone loss. Improvements in growing crystalline structures. This is important in ALL electronic devices.

Worth the cost? Less obvious. My take is privatized solutions are, but that’s just an opinion of one who has benefited from space investments.


#6

Why should we clean up the mess China, india and others are making?


#7

I think it’s worth it. Our planet is just a tiny speck in the universe; why shouldn’t we invest as much as possible in studying and understanding and exploring the vastness outside of it? If we didn’t we would be like ostriches sticking our heads in the sand.


#8

From my own (limited) research, it’s highly doubtful that Mars can ever be terraformed to the extent that would allow humans to walk without spacesuits outside of habitats currently being proposed. Also, I think it would be very difficult for a colony to sustain itself based solely on Mars’s resources, but who knows? One of the arguments made in favor of a Mars colony is that it would prevent the whole human race from being wiped out by a huge asteroid hitting Earth, which is almost inevitable given sufficient time. My own take is that if such a massive asteroid were coming at us, it is probably God’s answer to Come Lord Jesus, Come.


#9

I don’t know if it’s worth it, like in terms of cost analysis, but I just think astronomy is neat.


#10

No.

Extra letters.


#11

Regarding huge asteroids, the Moon is still there and in relatively good shape. Based on my reading of the current literature, Mars could be useful but here are the primary problems: 1) Lower gravity, 2) Clean water is likely to exist below the surface as water ice, and deeper still, as liquid water. A probe with a heated drill point should be sent to Mars to drill for water. Once confirmed, it may be possible to grow plants in a closed, heated environment. 3) Contaminants in the soil, including bacteria, may be found. It should be possible to take care of that.

The carbon dioxide atmosphere could be converted into liquid oxygen to fuel a return vehicle if other problems arise. Mars is quite cold. It could get as high as 68 degrees F at the equator to an average temperature of -67 degrees F. Heated suits would be required outside of any habitat on the ground. The suits would have to be weighted since the gravity on Mars is 0.375 that of earth.

Otherwise, Japan is planning moon missions, including a manned mission.


#12

No, it isn’t.


#13

Once a few more issues are sorted out I think a large chunk of the costs will be offset by space tourism. Perhaps the ISS will be replaced by a space hotel that happens to have attached research modules.

I think a moon base will be far more useful and practical especially as a testing grounds for Mars but with the ability to evac if something goes wrong.


#14

Not worth it. Spend money to have a good medical and dental care plan for all.


#15

If we were asked 50 years ago if it was worth getting to low Earth orbit, the answer would be no. Now we have communication satellites, GPS, weather stations and telescopes up there.
So regarding further space exploration? Ask me in about 300 years, then I can get back to you.


#16

They didn’t put WD-40 on this list, but they should have.

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/infographics/infographic.view.php?id=11358


#17

I think it’s worth it as long as we continue to push the envelope. I think near earth orbit should be turned over to the private sector and to the other nations while NASA focuses on the Moon, Mars and the outer solar system

And as far as costs are concerned there are some 5,300 colleges in the United States alone.

If we partnered more with colleges for staffing, research and FUNDING, we could do more and/or lessen the tax payer’s


#18

It depends…are we talking near space or deep outer space?

If it is near space, yes…kind of…satellites and what-not…

Deep space?

No…man is not designed for deep space…period.

I would like to see a Starbucks on the moon, but I gotta feeling something creepy is around that dark side…otherwise why haven’t we been back?

It would have made a lot more sense than an orbiting lab vs. one on the surface where experiments for developing medicine in low gravity could still be done…

Just my uneducated .02


#19

Somebody in the 15th Century probably asked the same question about global exploration.

As humans we have an inbuilt desire to explore and discover. If we didn’t follow that then we’d probably still be living in caves. It may not seem to be worth it now but eventually the investment will pay off.


#20

Touch question. Maybe let the private sector invest in it.


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.