Is St. Peters statue the pagan god Jupiter/Zeus?


#1

I was in a little conversation with a Seventh-Day Adventist...and you know their views on the Catholic Church :mad:...he was talking about that Jupiter looks like St. Peter and how the Church made it look like so. I saw a picture of Zeus and it looks like St. Peter. Did the Church make the statue of Jupiter, St. Peter?


#2

seriously?


#3

How more serious can a :mad: get? :stuck_out_tongue:


#4

[quote="JD27076, post:3, topic:264844"]
How more serious can a :mad: get? :p

[/quote]

"Seriously" you need to ask if the Church made a statue of St Peter look like Jupiter or turn a statue of Jupiter into St. Peter?


#5

The Seventh Day Adventists are yet another sect asserting a nonexistent apostasy. If you haven't read that explanation that I just linked to, you really need to. All you need to answer every Protestant claim is 1 Timothy 2:3-4 and a little common sense, as explained on the other side of that link.

As for the claim about statuary in the Vatican, etc., a picture is worth a thousand words.

http://forums.catholic.com/picture.php?albumid=1087&pictureid=9100


#6

Neo-classical art looks like Classical art. Is this your friend's big discovery?


#7

[quote="JD27076, post:1, topic:264844"]
I saw a picture of Zeus and it looks like St. Peter.

[/quote]

Which picture of Zeus looks like which picture of St. Peter?

If you do a google search of Zeus and a google search of St. Peter and display images, you will get a zillion images of each, and none of them look the same. Zeus is a fictional character, and no one knows what St. Peter looked like.

So all you have to go by is artist's renderings, which depicts them as looking like what most men of antiquity looked like, having shaggy hair and a full beard. The facial details are what the artist imagines them to be.


#8

:thumbsup:

The Renaissance sculptors and even painters used ancient Greek and Roman sculpture as their models, not only for their style but in some cases they would actually copy parts of the sculptures. That doesn’t mean they were necessarily equating the subject of the ancient sculpture with the subject of their own.

Really though, is this the best the SDAs can come up with to connect Jupiter to Catholicism? How about quoting some Dante at least? I bet I could do a much better job producing anti-Catholic nonsense if I wanted to. :wink:


#9

I don't dismiss the possibility, but I think what the OP is referring to is this silly site: reformation.org/abomination-of-desolation.html

Enjoy a little light reading; it's down toward the bottom. :rolleyes:


#10

With these anti-Catholic types, all it takes for a statue to be "pagan" is having the person portrayed holding their hand in some symbolic position, either that or having them look powerful and exalted. Was watching a YouTube video where they made that whole Zeus/Janus thing. Look, a picture of a pagan god with a hand raised! LOOK! A picture of Mary with her hands raised! See, charismatics worship Satan! (pun, btw, don't flame me).

Show them the orans posture, I bet they do it from time to time. Then tell them the pagan Romans did it when praying to their gods... it's just silly.


#11

Conor7: Thanks for the link to the reformation website. I've never seen so many nutty conspiracy theories collected in one place....wow, is all I can say! bob.c


#12

Okay. It really is not.

But what I wonder is: so what if it were?

Does it make the creator of the Universe any less *real *if someone decided to see Him as he once perceived the false god Zeus?

Does it mean *remotely *that somehow I am worshipping Zeus, because some artist thousands of years ago made a choice?

It is a sad reality that those who do not feel the real presence can not comprehend that oneness that God offers us today and so are relegated to taking cheap pot-shots in order to somehow justify themselves and their lack of faith.


#13

OH!

Duh. I just figured it out.

This is somehow “evidence” that we (Catholics) *worship *the pope?

This is SO sad that people are so easily lead astray by such nonsense.

BTW: love that picture of the “Black Pope standing with the White Pope” on that crazy site.

Thanks Conor7


#14

[quote="jpjd, post:7, topic:264844"]
Which picture of Zeus looks like which picture of St. Peter?

If you do a google search of Zeus and a google search of St. Peter and display images, you will get a zillion images of each, and none of them look the same. Zeus is a fictional character, and no one knows what St. Peter looked like.

[/quote]

Well, it's possible that we actually do.

Such are the earliest painted representations of the Apostles still in existence. With the exception of St. Peter and St. Paul, according to Wilpert, the Apostles show no specially individualistic traits, some are portrayed with beard, some without, but merely for the sake of variety. The two chief Apostles, on the other hand, are always easily recognized and are of marked individuality. St. Peter appears as a man of great energy, with a short, thick beard, and close cut, curly hair, which in the earlier frescoes is partly, in the later wholly, gray. St. Paul is represented as the Apostle of intellect, bald, and with long, pointed beard, dark brown in colour. With slight changes this type of the two Apostles was always represented in cemeterial frescoes, mosaics, and sculptured sarcophagi, and in fact persists to the present day. Indeed so familiar were Roman Christians with the conventional appearances of their favourite Apostles that, save in a few cases, the artists never thought it necessary to inscribe their names underneath their pictures, even when represented with other saints whose names are given. From this persistence of type Wilpert regards it as probable that, if the Romans did not actually possess portraits of Sts. Peter and Paul, at least a tradition existed as to their general appearance, and that catacomb representations of them conform to this tradition. The historian Eusebius informs us that he had heard of "likenesses of the Apostles Peter and Paul" as well as of Our Lord, being preserved in paintings (Church History VII.16).


#15

Hmm. Jupiter/Zeus was a storm god, portrayed with lightning bolts. St. Peter -- although I don't know in this particular case -- usually has keys as his symbol, since he received the keys to heaven. That alone should be enough to distinguish the two images.

It reminds me of the time I was in a museum in San Diego, and enjoying their icon room -- except that an icon of M~R Ɵ~Y (Mater Theou = Mother of God) was labeled as "A Virgin". I tried to tell them why this label was inadequate, and exactly why -- but they cheerfully ignored me. :p !


#16

lol...
my short and hopefully witty comment is that St. Peter holds the Keys to the Kingdom, And Zeus doesn't. boom.


#17

I particularly enjoyed this following quote from that anti-catholic/personal revelation of the end of the world website that another posted left in a previous comment. It is in reference to His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI (naturally).

The pagan Pontiff claims to be the mouthpiece of Almighty God.

When he speaks . . . the world listens!!

He tries to rule the world with the help of his Society of Zeus, his millions of followers, and his Muslims.

lolololol Some of the anti-catholic garbage out there is at least well crafted and creative but this is just infantile and tactless. The OP of this website/article would have an easier time convincing christians the world over that satan is in fact Christ and that Christ is satan and try to explain how we've been mislead (most likely by the Catholic Church no less). Sadly I came across a site similar to that years ago. Because Lucifer was referred to as an angel of light that was the justification for how satan was in fact our savior and that Christ was somehow the devil fooling the world into following Him straight into hell sigh


#18

I didn’t read all of the posts, but after reading the initial question and some of the responses, I feel the need to chime in. I totally disagree with the Seventh Day Adventists in theology, but there was some truth to where he was going with Peter deriving from a false god.
The statue of Peter in St. Peter’s Square is THE statue that was once called Jupiter (Zeus). When Constantine took things over, they re-named the statue St. Peter and it has been used as an icon ever since for him. If you do the research, you will learn that the prayers to the saints and even to Mary were a result of Constantine mixing the Christian faith with Pagan gods held by the people he was trying to “Christianize.” There was resistance to this by some faithful Christians who were persecuted by Rome as a result also. It’s why when you look at the pope and the cardinals you see all of the symbols all over them. These are Pagan symbols to try and make Catholicism more appealing to the pagan nations of old. Of course, they had to justify this, so they started making all kinds of stuff up about them.
So when good meaning people go to St. Peter’s Square and kiss the foot of “Peter” they are really bowing down to a false idol and Satan has a good laugh as people claiming to know God the Father bow before a false god.


#19

[quote="JD27076, post:1, topic:264844"]
I was in a little conversation with a Seventh-Day Adventist...and you know their views on the Catholic Church :mad:...he was talking about that Jupiter looks like St. Peter and how the Church made it look like so. I saw a picture of Zeus and it looks like St. Peter. Did the Church make the statue of Jupiter, St. Peter?

[/quote]

saintpetersbasilica.org/Statues/StPeter/StPeter.htm

saintpetersbasilica.org/Exterior/StPeterStatue/StPeterStatue.htm

saintpetersbasilica.org/Exterior/StPaulStatue/StPaulStatue.htm


#20

[quote="brentmcbain, post:18, topic:264844"]
I didn't read all of the posts, but after reading the initial question and some of the responses, I feel the need to chime in. I totally disagree with the Seventh Day Adventists in theology, but there was some truth to where he was going with Peter deriving from a false god.

The statue of Peter in St. Peter's Square is THE statue that was once called Jupiter (Zeus). When Constantine took things over, they re-named the statue St. Peter and it has been used as an icon ever since for him. If you do the research, you will learn that the prayers to the saints and even to Mary were a result of Constantine mixing the Christian faith with Pagan gods held by the people he was trying to "Christianize." There was resistance to this by some faithful Christians who were persecuted by Rome as a result also. It's why when you look at the pope and the cardinals you see all of the symbols all over them. These are Pagan symbols to try and make Catholicism more appealing to the pagan nations of old. Of course, they had to justify this, so they started making all kinds of stuff up about them.

So when good meaning people go to St. Peter's Square and kiss the foot of "Peter" they are really bowing down to a false idol and Satan has a good laugh as people claiming to know God the Father bow before a false god.

[/quote]

welcome to the forum.:)
stick around maybe you just might learn something.


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