Is the single life a vocation?


#1

catholicexchange.com/2006/03/02/81185

Check out this article by Mary Beth Bennaci.

She says that the dating pool is poisoned now/today because of sin and I think also becasue of a lack of sacramental life.

So do you think that the single life is a Permanent vocation? Or just a temporary state of life???


#2

Come on now… don’t be shy… answer please…


#3

I think being single for the sake of the kingdom is a vocation. It requires many sacrafices that will bear fruit.


#4

I think those that feel a desire to marry are meant to do so but God just doesn’t make it happen, because of sin and the way society has gone it is very difficult to find a Catholic partner or even a Good one who accept’s all Catholic value’s whom you will end up marrying. I believe that many won’t get married at all and will simply stay single for this reason. This is not God’s fault but society for turning it’s back on him and Catholic’s refusing to compromise their faith by marrying someone with conflicting value’s, no partner is compatible at all if the only way to sustain the relationship is turn your back on God as it should in fact be the opposite


#5

[quote="jason3477, post:1, topic:249455"]
So do you think that the single life is a Permanent vocation?

[/quote]

It doesn't matter what I think. The Church teaches the single life is indeed a vocation. To quote the Diocese of Sacramento:

Accepting the **vocation of the single life* means choosing to serve God as a member of the laity.* Single persons serve the Christian family through acts of love and service, in a variety of lay ministries.* Living a single life invites individuals to make a difference in their community and world as Jesus did.*


#6

I think it can be a vocation, if one has prayerfully discerned that God is calling them to be single. I think those that are called to a vocation of being single though, have no desire to be married or have a family, nor a calling to the religious life. I think there is a difference between a vocation of the single life and people that are single due to life's circumstances and God's timing that have a desire to be married and have a family and just haven't found a spouse yet.


#7

******From PatriceA:

"I think it can be a vocation, if one has prayerfully discerned that God is calling them to be single. I think those that are called to a vocation of being single though, have no desire to be married or have a family, nor a calling to the religious life. I think there is a difference between a vocation of the single life and people that are single due to life's circumstances and God's timing that have a desire to be married and have a family and just haven't found a spouse yet."****
**
You are very right PatriceA about your analysis of the initial posting. It is rare that a
faithful Catholic person who is not called to the religious has no desire to be married.
I can think of a couple of reasons why that may be so-a. person has SSA-which
of course we do not think can be married. b. person has a great calling-i.e. like Dr.
Tom Dooley (but that is rare) or c. person has mental or severe emotional problems (in
these cases may be wise not be married. Have heard Sister RosalindMoss talk on
EWTN on this subject-and she believes people are generally called to be either married
or religious life. In my personal life believe also this is generally the case. But sometimes once a person ages (especially if a women) and never married-it can
be very very difficult even if want to marry to find someone. That can be very
trying and frustrating.
For all who think they may have a single calling-would encourage them not to make
this determination by themselves. But to talk with a good spiritual director/priest. And
immerse yourself in the Church. If you are not married-you have a wonderful opportunity
through your work place and volunteering of showing Christ's love to the world. He
will never let you down.

Pax et Bonum
Timothy from Reno


#8

In my opinion, singlehood is a state of life, not a vocation.

The only way it is a vocation would be if if it’s ‘consecrated’, say as a hermit or a consecrated virgin.

I’m in my mid-50s and still single. For me, it’s a combination of choice and circumstances. i never wanted to get married, and at my age (and with all the debts I have which I can’t pay), none of the ‘good’ religious Orders will even look at me.

I tend to keep to myself, anyway-not much the ‘volunteer’ type.

And the Church doesn’t say very much about us ‘ordinary’ single Catholics as a way of support, anyway. You never see anything to recognize singles the way it does with married people (World Marriage Day) and students in Catholic schools (Catholic Schools Week). It’s always about ‘families’. Not everyone has ‘organizational’ skills or runs around trying to ‘save the world’-not everyone is a ‘leader wanna-be’, in spite of all the stuff to the contrary that is said in print and from the pulpit in church.

Singlehood ‘sucks’ at times-but what can you do? You survive as best you can in this crazy, mixup and oftentimes evil world. :frowning: :mad:


#9

But it’s hard to find a good spiritual director. And besides, a lot of them are clueless when it comes to single people, anyway. Priests don’t have to worry about struggling to make ends meet, as we lay people out here ‘in the world’. And with the constant threat of sexual abuse allegations (and greedy lawyers out for blood to boot), I don’t think a lot of priests would want to be seen around women anyway.

Call my cynical (or just too wound up with caffeine today :o ), but that’s how I feel about this…


#10

The single life is both a vocation and a way of life, one which I have chosen.

Since no one knows what’s in their future, I can’t say with 100% certainty that I will remain single for the rest of my life. However, at 41 years old, I can say with a great deal of certainty that if I do ever marry, it will probably be after menopause, which is fine with me. However, thus far, being single is my calling.


#11

Don't you need to take vows for it to be a vocation?


#12

Who made that requirement? Do all vocations require a set of vows? A vocation is a committment to a way of life. I know doctors, nurses and I think lawyers do. What about all the other vocations out there? Do they all require a set of vows? I don’t know much about the existence of a set of vows for police or firefighters, though I wouldn’t be surprised if they took an oath. What about archetechs? Pilots? You certainly don’t need to make any formal vows when you choose parenthood as a vocation, I mean, outside of the Sacrament of Marriage. There are many single parents out there who obviously include parenthood as one of their vocations, and have not made any vows. However, I would be kind of surprised if the Church denied single parents had a vocation as parents.


#13

[quote="Rence, post:12, topic:249455"]
Who made that requirement? Do all vocations require a set of vows? A vocation is a committment to a way of life. I know doctors, nurses and I think lawyers do. What about all the other vocations out there? Do they all require a set of vows? I don't know much about the existence of a set of vows for police or firefighters, though I wouldn't be surprised if they took an oath. What about archetechs? Pilots? You certainly don't need to make any formal vows when you choose parenthood as a vocation, I mean, outside of the Sacrament of Marriage. There are many single parents out there who obviously include parenthood as one of their vocations, and have not made any vows. However, I would be kind of surprised if the Church denied single parents had a vocation as parents.

[/quote]

I'm referring to vocations within the Church. I actually don't know, so I'm asking the question. But people are referring to two different types of vocations; a vocation to marriage or the priesthood is not the same type of vocation as being a plumber or a school teacher


#14

i think it depends on the reason why your single


#15

You are referring to the vows taken within one of the Sacraments of the Church. Many that are called to the vocation of being single, still take vows, either by joining a lay association or to be a consecrated virgin. The vows they take are just not part of one of the Sacraments of the Church. Just because their vocation to be single isn’t part of one of the Sacraments does not mean their vocation is any less important than being married or being called to the religious life.


#16

[quote="ChiRho, post:13, topic:249455"]
I'm referring to vocations within the Church. I actually don't know, so I'm asking the question. But people are referring to two different types of vocations; a vocation to marriage or the priesthood is not the same type of vocation as being a plumber or a school teacher

[/quote]

Yeah, but you're talking about Sacraments. Sacraments are not the same as vocations. Not all Sacraments are vocations, and not all vocations are Sacraments. Being called to the single life is a valid vocation, or chosen way of life.


#17

[quote="Rence, post:12, topic:249455"]
Who made that requirement? Do all vocations require a set of vows? A vocation is a committment to a way of life. I know doctors, nurses and I think lawyers do. What about all the other vocations out there? Do they all require a set of vows? I don't know much about the existence of a set of vows for police or firefighters, though I wouldn't be surprised if they took an oath. What about archetechs? Pilots? You certainly don't need to make any formal vows when you choose parenthood as a vocation, I mean, outside of the Sacrament of Marriage. There are many single parents out there who obviously include parenthood as one of their vocations, and have not made any vows. However, I would be kind of surprised if the Church denied single parents had a vocation as parents.

[/quote]

But is not one of the characteristics of a vocation permanence? A vow "locks" you into that state for life (such as a marriage vow, a vow/solemn promise by a priest or religious). Unless a person who is single takes a vow (in which case he or she now is considered to be part of consecrated life), he or she is not precluded from entering the married or clerical/religious state at a later date (barring any other canonical impediments). There are a few exceptions (Eastern rites can ordain married men, and some in the consecrated life may get ordained). So, logic tells me that being single is a temporary state, not a permanent vocation.


#18

[quote="Paddy1989, post:4, topic:249455"]
I think those that feel a desire to marry are meant to do so but God just doesn't make it happen, because of sin and the way society has gone it is very difficult to find a Catholic partner or even a Good one who accept's all Catholic value's whom you will end up marrying. I believe that many won't get married at all and will simply stay single for this reason. This is not God's fault but society for turning it's back on him and Catholic's refusing to compromise their faith by marrying someone with conflicting value's, no partner is compatible at all if the only way to sustain the relationship is turn your back on God as it should in fact be the opposite

[/quote]

DING! DING! DING! We have a winner!


#19

I totally agree-the pool is poisoned becasue of promiscuity.

But also tell me, why has Mass attedance dropped down to 25% ???


#20

The CCC includes what you posted above as part of “virginity for the sake of the kingdom”, which, along with marriage, are the only two states of life listed as vocations in the CCC (“virginity for the sake of the kingdom” is further defined as “priestly ministry” and “consecrated life” in CCC 2233).


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